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October 1984 




Magnetic games 



/software to use 



/for Spectrum, 



/VIC 20, Texas, 








■ 



£3- \X. 






48K Spectrum 



CBM64E6 95 




AVAILABLE FROM SELECTED BRANCHES OF: 



RETAILERS CONTACT: 



John Menzies 



1WHSMITH 



MICRO DEALER UK Ltd 



Tiger trader 



makro 



£& 



'€> 



ALSO AVAILABLE AT ALL 
USUAL SOFTWARE OUTLETS. 



Greemichip 

alDEBEWHAMS 



i£ 



CentreSoft 

PCS DISTRIBUTION 

Bulldog 

SSL 



It's p **Q 
4*411 M 





ACTUAL SCREEN DISPLAYS 

The Most Graphical 

Arcade Simulation 

Ever Produced 



by CHRIS KERRY 



£5.95 Incl VAT — Tst Class P&P by Return 

If you have difficulty in obtaining your copy. Just fill in the Coupon below. 



Post coupon now to: Thor (Computer Software) Co. Ltd., 
Erskine Industrial Estate, Liverpool, 
Merseyaide L6 lAP Tel: 051-263 8S21/2 



I enclose Cheque/PO for £ 
Name 



Address 



Credit Cards- Orders accepted by Phone - 
051-263 8521/2 



DISTRIBUTOR AND OVERSEAS ENQUIRIES CONTACT PAUL 051-263 8521/2 



rkr 







m 



At R&R we believe 

that value comes first, 

and we make it our business 

to ensure that we provide good 

quality programs at realistic prices . . . 

for your enjoyment. 

ALL ARCADE GAMES NORMALLY HAVE 

CHOICE OF KEYBOARD OR JOYSTICK CONTROL. 

Should you have difficulty in obtaining our products 

from your local Dealer please send cheque or Postal 

Order indicating titles required, for return of post service 



TITANIC 

The Adventure Begins 

(For 48K Spectrum Only) 

Find the wreck of the TITANIC, Locate the sunken 

Gold. Survive the dangers of the deep. An 

Adventure.' Management game for FAMILY 

entertainment. 

WITH Currah Micro Speech and FREE Pop Music. 



r.r.p.£7.95 



CHOPPER X-1 

(For any ZX Spectrum) 

You command the Spectrum Chopper X-1 Gunship — 

Your mission is to repel invading forces and save the 

earth. An action pa ked original game in full machine 

code. 

r.r.p £5.50 



JUNIOR ARITHMETIC 

(For any ZX Spectrum) 

An excellent educational program for 6-9 year olds. 
The fun way to learn and practice Addition. 
Subtraction, Multiplication and Division. Mistakes 
are corrected and explained, along with a running 
total of correct answers. 

Terrific value at just p* ^ c 

R.R.P. £4.90 



SPECTIPEDE 



(For any ZX Spectrum) 

Enjoy the thrill of this full machine code arcade game. 
Battle to keep the Spectipede at bay but watch out 
for a very unpredictable spider which is out to get you. 
For 1 or 2 players with top score and on-screen high 
score feature. 



R.R.P. 



£5.50 



GOLF 



GNASHER 



STAR TREK 



(For any ZX Spectrum) 

Enjoy a game of golf in the comfort of your own home! 
With the choice of a 9 or 18 hole course and the 
challenge of Fairway. Rough, Trees. Bunkers, Water 
& Green. Displays are in realistic colour graphics 
with full score cards. No two games are alike! 



£3.75 



(For any ZX Spectrum) 

The "famous" arcade maze game with fast machine 
code action, excellent graphics, colour and sound. 
Eat-up all the dots before the Ghosts eat you. or beat 
them to an energy pill which will allow you to eat 
Ihem! Hours of addictive fun 
with on-screen scoring and 
high -score tape-save capability 

,or|US ' r.r.p. £4.95 



DEALER ENQUIRIES WELCOME 

R&R Software Ltd. 

5 Russell Street, Gloucester GL1 1 NE. 

Tel (0452) 502819 




(For 48K Spectrum only) 

One of the original computer space games, but this 
program has many up-dated features normally only 
found on larger computer versions. Test yourself as 
Starship Commander as your mission takes you to the 
outer reaches of the Galaxy to 
protect Federation Space, the 
Starship and yourself! Excellent 



OTHER COMPUTERS? 

Send S.A.E. for a full list of our 
growing range of software 
available for ZX81 and now 
ORIC-1 Computers. 



R.R.P. 



£4.95 



SOFTWARE 




CALLING ALL PROGRAMMERS . . . 

WANTED New, Quality Software. 

Send us your latest Program 
for evaluation- NOW. 



AVAILABLE FROM LEADING DEALERS NATIONWIDE 



:..■■■.■..„ 




REGULARS 



N 1 1 D Video V Y in 9 5 1 1 

t?!?' S .' '.'.l' ' ' ' J7 ', ' ' '.' ,'J ' iVu' ' ' ' 1, 8 VCS owners stop here — read all about software for 

Tittle tattle and tales told of the software game. El you 



Letters 2 Off Adventure into Programming 81 

Read the input of our readers — maybe you' II f eel promp- B Steve Lucas helps put the heart into your own adventure 
ted to write to us too. ■ games. 



Puzzles 2 81 Brainware 7 Of 

Our intrepid duo Lou and Les are again out to beat your I The software reviews section for thinking players who 
b ra i ns y like adventure and strategy. 



Answers . 



80 



SOFTWARE REVIEWS -I Ol 

Parti ■ °l 

Part2 57| 

of games reviewed by our tough team of testers. 

hhi 






%%&&»' ■-■ -- 



Games Computing is normally published on the second Friday in the month proceeding cover date. The contents of this publicatioi i including all articles, designs, plans, drawings and programs and all 
copyright and other intellectual property rights theirein belong to Argus Specialist Publications Limited. All rights conferred by the Law of Copyright and other intellectual property rights and by virtue of in- 
ternational copyright conventions are specifically reserved to Argus Specialist Publications Limited and any reproduction requires the prior written consent of the Company. © 1 984 Argus Specialist 
Publications Ltd. All reasonable care is taken in the preparation of the magazine contents, but the publishers cannot be held legally responsible for errors. Where mistakes do occur, a correction will normally 
be published as soon as possible afterwards. All prices and data contained in advertisements are accepted by us in good faith as correct at time of going to press. Neither the advertisers, nor the publishers 
can be held responsible, however, for any variation affecting price or availability which may occur after the publication has closed for press. 

Subscription rates. 

UK £ 1 2 .95 including postage. Airmail and other rates upon application to: Games Computing, Infonet Ltd, Times House, 179 The Marlowes, Hemel Hempstead, Herts HP1 1 BB. Telephone: (0442 ) 




OCTO BER 198 4 

PR OGRAMS T O PLAY 

Death of a Dictator Amstrad 6 | 

Play the leading role in this smart adventure game. 

IP 

jil | Missile Silo CBM64 2 2 

Shoot 'em down quick, before they get you. 

The Ruins Atari3 4 

A haunting adventure to type in and play. 

i; 

Cricket CBM38 

Let's hope you do better than the England game in this 
_ test match. 

^^^S«^V^I|| FREE POSTER 

IPS? I ^NfcN^ Helicopter Pilot Atari 4 5 [ 

Man the controls of this chopper in a testing game of j 
skill 

' M , Rj Alien Intruders BBC O £ 

y More aliens galore, you just can't keep a good alien | 
down! 

ten / , « 

Metal Man Atmos/Olic 7 41 

Tin town tinkering with Nick 'el Alloy, Rusty Bolt and| 
their friends and enemies. 

Sub Hunt Spectrum 821 

Dive into the depths in this great submarine simulation! 
game. 

/ if 

Y _ 




4& 



'* 



After many years of hard saving, I book- 
ed my holiday on the sunny island of 
Kol, which is situated in the Mediterra- 
nean. Since I set off, however, things 
have gone from bad to worse! 

There was a strike by baggage staff 
at the airport, which delayed my flight 
and when I arrived in the middle of the 
night, I was so tired that I slept for 
about 48 hours. Despite the fact that 
the island holds the record for sunshine, 
the rain has been torrential and most 
areas of the island are flooded. 

When I awoke this morning, I found 
that the island has been invaded by the 
troops of the Emperor of Holaria, who < 
is reputed to be hiding somewhere 
on the island. The radio statior 
has been taken over by 
the troops who are 
putting out 



the message that unless the famed Dia- 
mond of Kol is delivered to the Emperor 
himself, he will explode a nuclear bomb 
and destroy the island in 150 minutes. 
I seem to be one of the only in- 
habitants left alive and unless I am 
quick, he is likely to carry out his threat! 
Each move takes one minute and you 
can help me by giving me instructions in 
the form of two word sentences such 
as EAT FOOD, GET LAMP etc. 

RUNdown 

Lines Action 

50-60 initialisation 

70 call titles 

80-100 read data 

1 1 choose instructions 

140 choose colours. ..change 

to suit 
150-730 main control loop. ..this 

is a WHILE- WEND loop 
160-260 control directions 

270-310 items seen 

320-340 input... converted to 



350 
360-720 

770-1730 

1740-2090 

2100-2140 

2150-2270 

2280-2330 



number of turns 
call routine if input 
recognised 
routine for actions 
data for game 
titles 

instructions 
lose game 



Variables Used 



p% 

S%(x,y) 

B%(x,y) 

N%(x) 

N$(x) 

Q$)x) 

G$)x) 

x,y 

SA-SX 



location 

map 

pointer 

pointer 

words understood 

description of location 

items 

control variables 

flags 




Conversion Clues 



The main control loop of this 
program is the WHILE WEND loop 
from line 150-730. This could be 
replaced by a REPEAT UNTIL loop 
or a conditional GOTO. 



LOCATE... can be replaced with 
PRINT @ or PRINT TAB(x.y) as 
appropriate to your machine 
PAPER, INK, PEN are used to select 
colour... you could use PRINT 
CHR$(x) or whatever method 
applied to your machine. The 



5. 
6. 



program was written in MODE 1 , 

which allows just 4 colours to be 

displayed in 40 column screen. The 

colours selected give a good 

display if you have a colour 

monitor. You may wish to change 

these if using the green screen 

using the INK statements in line 

60. 

LOWER$ ...converts string to lower 

case. 

UPPER$ ...converts string to upper 

case. 

The Amstrad interprets lower case 

and upper case as the same thing, 

so that you can type the program in 

lower case or upper case! Note that 

you MUST leave spaces after 

BASIC key-words, as otherwise 

they may be interpreted as part of a 

variable name! 



10 REM ** Death of a Dictator ** 

20 REM ** an adventure game -for theAmstrad CPC 464** 

30 REM ** Steve Lucas July 1784 ** 

40 REM to prevent escaping -from program change this lin 

e to ON BREAK 60SUB 62000 and add RUN in line 62000 

50 G7.=0:P7.=54:DIM S7. ( 103, 4) , X* (35) , NX (70) , Q* < 103) ,0* (60 

) ,V*<4> ,B7. (103, 1) ,N*<101> 

60 MODE 1: INK 0,1: INK 1,24: INK 2,20: INK 3,6 

70 GOSUB 2100 

B0 RESTORE: FOR X=l TO 103: READ Q* < X ) : FOR Y=l TO 4: R 

EAD S7.(X,Y>: NEXT Y:NEXT X 

70 FOR X=l TO 35: READ X*(X): NEXT X: FOR X=l TO 20 : RE 

AD G*(X) ,B7.(X,1) : NEXT 

100 FOR X=l TO 27: READ N* < X > , N7. < X ) : NEXT 

110 LOCATE 5,20: PRINT"Do you want instructions <Y/N> ? 

120 aa*=INKEY*: IF aaS="" THEN 120 

130 IF aa*="y" OR aa*="Y" THEN GOSUB 2150 

140 MODE 1: PAPER 0: PEN 1 : BORDER 3 

150 WHILE 17.<147 

160 PRINT:PAPER 1: PEN 0: PRINT" I am :-": PRINT: PAPER 

: PEN 2: PRINT Q*(P%): a*=" " : gh=FRE ( " " ) 

170 IF S7.(P7.,1)>0 THEN a*="North" 

180 IF S7.(P7.,2)>0 AND LEN(a*)=0 THEN a*="South" ELSE IF 

S7.(P7.,2)>0 THEN a*=a*+" , South " 
190 IF S7. (P7.,3)>0 AND LEN(a*>=0 THEN a*="East" ELSE IF 
S7. <P7.,3> >0 THEN a*=a*+" , East " 

200 IF S7.(P7.,4)>0 AND LEN(a*)=0 THEN a*="West" ELSE IF 
S7.(P7.,4)>0 THEN a*=a*+" .West" 
210 IF a$="" THEN al="nDwhere obvious" 

220 IF P7.= 103 AND aa=l THEN CLS: GOTO 740: REM win game 
230 IF g7.>149 THEN x*="You ran out o-f time and He blew 
the island up !": GOTO 2280 

240 PRINT: PRINT: PAPER 1: PEN 3: PRINT" I can go :-":PRI 
NT: PAPER 0: PEN 1: PR I NT a* 

250 PRINT: PAPER 2: PEN 0: PRINT" I have ";150-g7.;" moves 
left": PAPER 0: PEN 2 
260 e=0:FOR x = l TO 20 

270 pp7.=0: IF B7.(x,l)=P7. THEN pp7.= l 
280 IF pp7.= l THEN 300 
290 NEXT: GOTO 320 

300 IF e=0 THEN PRINT: PAPER 1: PEN 3: PRINT" I can see 
:-": PAPER : PEN 1 
310 PRINT G*(x>: e=e+l: GOTO 270 

320 PRINT: PRINT: INPUT"What should I do now ";z* 
330 z*=LOWER*(z*> 

340 b*=LEFT*(z*,2) : c*=LEFTS (z*,3) 
350 CLS: g7.=g7.U 
360 IF c*="loo"THEN 150 

370 IF c*="sco" THEN PRINT"This isn't a game you know!" 
: GOTO 150 

380 IF c*="eat" THEN PRINT x*(9>: GOTO 150 
390 IF c*="rub" THEN PRINT x*(12>: GOTO 150 
400 IF c*="hel" THEN PRINT x*<16>: GOTO 150 
410 IF c*="dri" THEN PRINT" I don't see anything here I 
'd like to drink!":GOTO 150 

420 IF c*="say" OR c*="spe" THEN PRINT x*(4): GOTO 150 
430 IF c*="pra" THEN PRINT x*(18): PRINT"Nothi ng happen 
s'": GOTO 150 

440 IF b*="n" AND S7. (P7. , 1 > < >0 THEN P7.=S7. (P7. , 1 ) : PRINT x 
*(27): GOTO 150 

450 IF b*="s" AND S7.(P7.,2><>0 THEN P7.=S7. (P7. , 2) : PRINT x 
*<27) : GOTO 150 

460 IF b*="e" AND S7. (P7.,3)<>0 THEN P7.=S7. (P7. , 3) : PRINT x 
*(27) : GOTO 150 
470 IF b*="w" AND S7. (P7.,4) 
(27): GOTO 150 



>0 THEN P7.=S7. <P7. ,4) .-PRINT x* 



480 IF tzt-="rea" THEN PRINT"! can't see anything to read 

!": Gotol20 

490 IF b*="n" OR b*="s" OR b*="e" OR b*="w" THEN PRINT" 

I can't go that way !": GOTO 150 

500 IF c*="pho" THEN PRINT"now then don't be silly!": G 

OTO 150 

510 IF b*="fu" 

520 IF c*="bug 

530 IF c*="inv 

540 IF c$="row 



THEN 1620 



OR b*="pi" THEN PRINT x*(22): GOTO 150 
THEN PRINT x*(23>: GOTO 150 
THEN 1480 
OR c*="sai" OR c*="pad" OR z*="go dingh 



550 

560 

570 

580 

590 

600 

T x: 

610 

620 

630 

640 

650 

660 

670 

680 

690 

sua! 



IF c$="up" 

IF c$="dow 

IF c*="out 

IF b*="in" 

IF z$="go bus" OR z$="go ride" 

IF c*="wai" THEN PRINT x*(27): 

g7.=g7.+ l: GOTO 150 
IF c*="jum" THEN 980 
" THEN 1000 

OR c*="tak 

OR c*="lea 



OR c*="cli" OR z*="go up" THEN 770 
OR z*="go down" THEN 830 
OR z*="go out" THEN 880 
OR z*="go in" THEN 920 

OR c*="rid" THEN 950 
FOR x=l TO 1000: NEX 



IF c*="div" 
IF c*="get" 
IF c*="dro" 
IF c$="ope" 
IF cS="unl" 
IF c*="kis" 
IF c*="g iV " 
IF c*="exa" 
!": GOTO 



OR c*="gra" THEN 1030 
OR c*="put" THEN 1350 

AND P7.=64 THEN PRINT X*(26): GOTO 

THEN 1550 



150 



THEN 1610 
THEN 1650 

" THEN PRINT' 

150 



I see nothing special or unu 



1 THEN PRINT"Just give me a direction and 
I have to ! " 
' OR c*="sho' 
1 THEN PRINT' 



: GOTO 150 

OR c*="des" THEN 
I see nothing here' 



W 



You have solved this a 



700 IF c*="swi 
I'll swim if 
710 IF c*="kil 
720 IF c*="sea 


730 PRINT x*(5): WEND 
740 CLS: PRINT: PAPER 2: PRINT 
": PAPER 1 

~5S , RINT:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT" 
dventure. " 
760 END 

770 IF P7.=29 THEN PRINT X*(7):P7.=30 
780 IF P7.= 100 THEN PRINT X*(7): P7.= 101: GOTO 150 
790 IF P7.= 13 THEN PRINT"I keep slipping back !": 
50 

B00 IF P7.=60 THEN PRINT X*<7): GOTO 150 
810 IF P7.=41 THEN PRINT X*(7): SOTO 150 
820 PRINT" I can't do that here !": GOTO 150 
830 IF P7.=30 THEN PRINT X* (8) : P7.=27: GOTO 150 



o80 

: GOTO IE 



11 Done 



GOTO 150 



GOTO 1 



B40 IF P7.= 40 THEN P7.=41: PRINT 
850 IF P7.= 101 THEN PRINT X*(B) 
860 IF P7.=61 THEN PRINT X*(B): 
870 GOTO B20 

880 IF P7.=74 THEN PRINT X*<27) 
870 IF P7.=28 THEN P7.=27: PRINT 
900 PRINT"How can I 
910 PRINT"Now who's 



X*(8) : GOTO 150 

P7.= 100: GOTO 150 
P7.=60: GOTO 150 



P7.=73: GOTO 150 
X*(27): SOTO 150 
do that here ?": GOTO 150 
a SILLY BILLY then ?": GOTO 150 



920 IF Py.=27 THEN P7.=2B: PRINT X*(27): GOTO 150 

930 IF P7.=73 THEN P7.=74: PRINT X*(27): GOTO 150 

940 PRINT" I can't do that here!": GOTO 150 

950 IF P7.=26 THEN PRINT"There ' s not a bus in sight that 

's running!": GOTO 150 

960 IF P7.=38 THEN PRINT X*(27): PRINT"I get off at the 

next stop": P7.=26: GOTO 150 

970 PRINT"Don't be absurd ! " : GOTO 150 

980 IF P7.=90 THEN PRINT X*<27): P7.=B9 : GOTO 150 

790 IF P7.=89 THEN P7.=90: PRINT"Phew just made it!": GOTO 

150 
1000 IF P7.=63 OR P7.=59 THEN PRINT"SPLASH ! " : P7.=15: GOTO 
150 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



1010 PRINT"Now who's a SILLY BILLY then ?": SOTO 150 

1020 IF se=l THEN PRINT x*(25>: GOTO 150 

1030 BOSUB 1260 

1040 IF 17.= 1 THEN 1060 

1050 GOTO 150 

1060 e7.=0 

1070 FOR x = l TO 20: IF B7. < x , 1 ) =P7. AND B7. (N7. <r ) , 1 ) =P7. TH 

EN e7.= l 

1080 NEXT x 

1090 IF e7.=0 THEN 150 

1100 IF P7.= 103 AND <r=l OR r=2> THEN PRINT x*(19):S0T0 

150 

1110 IF r=S THEN sa=l 

1120 IF r=18 THEN sb=l 

1130 IF r=26 THEN sc=l 

1140 IF r=25 THEN sb=l 

1150 IF P7.=64 AND r=7 AND seOl THEN PRINT x*<3>: GOTO 

150 

1160 IF P7.=64 AND r=23 AND seOl THEN PRINT" I can't see 

it here! ": GOTO 150 
1170 IF P7.=36 AND r=27 THEN PRINT"What sort o-f person d 
o you take me -for ?": GOTO 150 

1180 IF P7.=98 AND r=24 THEN PRINT" It's stuck!": GOTO 15 


1190 IF r=23 THEN 6S=1 

1200 IF r=15 AND P7.=23 THEN PRINT x*(ll):GOTO 150 
1210 e7.=0 

1220 FOR x = l TO 3: IF V*(x>="" THEN v* (x ) =G* <N7. (r ) ) : e7. 
=1: x=7 
1230 NEXT 

1240 IF e7.=0 THEN PRINT"my hands are f ul 1 ! " : GOTO 150 
1250 B7. (N7. (r) , 1)=0: GOTO 150 
1260 1*="": FOR x = l TO LEN(z*) 

1270 IF MID*(z*,x,l)=" " THEN 1 *=RIGHT* (z* , (LEN (z*) -x ) > 
: x=x+40 
1280 NEXT x 

1290 r=0: 17.=0: IF LEN<1*)<2 THEN RETURN 
1300 FOR x=l TO 27 
1310 N*(x)=LOWER*(N*<x> ) 

1320 IF LEFT*(N*(x> ,LEN<1*) )=1* THEN 17.= 1: r=x 
1330 NEXT 
1340 RETURN 
1350 GOSUB 1260 
1360 IF 17.= 1 THEN 1380 
1370 PRINT"I can't see a ";1* 
1380 e7.=0 

1390 FOR x = l TO 3: IF V* (x ) =G* (N7. (r ) ) THEN V*(x)=" ": e7. 
= 1 

1400 NEXT x 

1410 IF e7.= l THEN 1430 

1420 PRINT" I don't have it ! " : SOTO 150 
1 430 B7. ( N7. ( r > , 1 ) =P7. 
1440 CLS 

1450 IF r=26 THEN sc=0 ELSE IF r=25 THEN sb=0 ELSE IF r 
=8 THEN sa=0 ELSE IF r=7 THEN sd=0 



« 



m, 



» 



■f ■/.= i 



1460 IF r=22 THEN ss=0 

1470 GOTO 150 

1480 PRINT" I am carrying :-" 

1490 f7.=0 

1500 FOR x=l TO 3 

1510 IF V*(x><>"" THEN PRINT V*(x) 

1520 NEXT 

1530 IF f7.=0 THEN PRINT"Not a thing!" 

1540 GOTO 150 

1550 IF p7.=64 OR p7.=35 THEN 1570 

1560 PRINT"Don't be silly !": GOTO 150 

1570 IF P7.=64 AND saOl THEN PRINT x*(15): GOTO 150 

1580 IF p7.=35 THEN PRINT"The padlock is too rusty to un 

lock with this key!": GOTO 150 

1590 IF se=0 THEN 1600 ELSE PRINT x*<25>: GOTO 150 

1600 se=l: PRINT x*(29):PRINT x*(30>: g*(16)="The DIAMO 

ND": GOTO 150 

1610 IF p7.<>36 THEN PRINT" I can't dD that here": GOTO 1 

50 ELSE PRINT X*<27): PRINT"She smiles -for a second": G 

OTO 150 

1620 IF p7.=53 OR p7.=52 THEN 1630 ELSE PRINT" I can't do 

that here! ": GOTO 150 

1630 IF p7.=52 THEN PRINT x* (27 ) : PRINT" I sail the boat": 

P7.=53: B7. (6,1) =53: GOTO 150 
1640 PRINT x*(27): PRINT"I paddle the dinghy": P7.=52: B 
7. (6,1) =52: GOTO 150 

1650 IF p7.<>103 THEN PRINT"I can't give the diamond to 
the Emperor HERE ! " : GOTO 150 
1660 IF ssOl THEN x*="He notices that I don't have the 

DIAMOND and kills me with his sword!": GOTO 2280 
1670 CLS: GOTO 740 

1680 IF p7.=23 THEN PRINT"Don't be so cruel!": GOTO 150 
1690 IF P7.=36 THEN PRINT"What do you take me for ...a S 
ADIST ?": GOTO 150 

1700 IF p7.<>103 THEN PRINT"Not here!": GOTO 150 
1710 IF sbOl THEN PRINT" I have no weapon !": GOTO 150 
1720 IF seOl THEN PRINT"I pull out the gun.. but there' 
5 no bullet !": x*="I don't think He liked that": 
GOTO 2280 

1730 PRINT"I quickly load the gun and kill the EMPE 
ROR":FOR x= 1 TO 2000: NEXT x: GOTO 740 
1740 DATA in the main shopping street ,22, 2, 23,27 , in a c 



£ 




■/""' 



^ 



t 

> 



"\ 




GAMES COMPUTJt 




m. 






- 



DEATHS 

DICTATOR 

I- 

overed market , 1 , 3 ,0,0, by a street stall. It's empty, 2,4 

,8, 7,outsi de the public 1 i brary , 3 , 5, ,6 , in the civic ce 

ntre,4, 16, 12,0, by the checkout desk of the library, 0,0, 

4,86 

1750 DATA in a small chemist's shop. The shelves are e 

mpty , 0,0,3 , 0, on a main road. There's not a car in si 

ght ,0,0,9,3 

1760 DATA on the main road , 0,0, 10, 8 , by some traffic lig 

hts which seem to be out of order , 26 , 0, 1 1 , 9,by a workma 

n's hut. There's a deep hole here 

1770 DATA 0,0,0, 10, at the entrance to a swimming pool,0 

,0,0, 5, at the bottom of a muddy hole. I keep slipping 

in the mud!, 0,0. 0,0 
1780 DATA at the shallow end of a swimming pool, 12, 0,0, 
0, swimming in deep water , 0,58,0, 0, i n the village square 
. It's full of cafe's 

1790 DATA 5,0,0, 17, outside the Hotel Colrosa, 0,21 , 16, IS 
, walking along a narrow footpath with woods on eithe 
r si de, 0,0, 17, 19, deep in the forest. There's a tall tre 
e here, 0,0, 18,0 

1800 DATA at the top of a tree, 0,0, 0, 0, i n the hotel ent 
ranee, 17,64,0,0 

1810 DATA outside an amusement arcade, 73, 1 ,24,0, i nsi de 
an amusement arcade. All the machines have been tur 
ned of f ,24,0,0, 1 , in a dirty al leyway , 0,23, 25 ,22 
1820 DATA on the top of a low wal 1 , 0,0, 0,24, at a bus st 
op, 0, 10, 0,0, outside Woolworth's 

1830 DATA 0,0, 1,0, in the gardening section. The entranc 
e is nearby ,0,0, 0,29, at the bottom of a stai rcase, 0,34 
,28,0, at the top of the stai rs , 0, 0,31 ,0, in the electric 
al department ,0,32,33,30 
1840 DATA in the staff canteen , 31 ,0,0,0, by a display of 

computers, 0,0,0, 31 , at the checkout ,29,0,0, 0, i n a loadi 
ng bay ,0,0,36,0, in a narrow tunnel ,0,37, 0,35, at the end 

of the tunnel ,36,0,38,0 
1850 DATA at a bus terminus. There are plenty of buses 

here, 39, 0,0, 37, on the edge of town ,0, 38, 40, 0, at some t 
raffic lights. There's an open manhole in the ground, 42 
,0,0, 39, in a sewer . It's full of rats and ####,0,0,0,0 
1860 DATA on a main road. The river has burst its banks 
, 45, 40,0, 43,paddl i ng waist deep in muddy water , 44 , , 42, 
0, outside the National Bank of Holoria. It is flooded, 5 
0,43, 45, 46, by deep flood water. I can see only wate 
r to the North, 0,42, 0,44 

1870 DATA in the bank entrance. It's f 1 ooded ,49, 47,44 ,4 
8, at the counter. There's no-ane servi ng !, 46 ,0,0,0, i n t 
he main hall of the bank , , , 46 , , i n the manager's of f i 
ce. The water is very deep here. , , 46 , , , outsi de a cin 
ema,52,44,51 ,0 

1880 DATA inside the cinema entrance. It's closed!, 0,0, 
0,50, in the middle of the road. I can't go North beca 
use of the f 1 oods ,0, 50, 0,0 , by the roof of a large flood 
ed warehouse , 55, 0,0, 54 

1890 DATA on a large plank of wood floating on the wate 
r ,0,0, 53,0, on the roof of a bui 1 rii ng , 0,53,56 ,0 , by a tal 
1 chimney ,0,57, 0,55, at the other side of the roof. The 
flood stretches for mi 1 es , 56,0 , 0,0 , on the steps at the 
side of the pool , 15, 0,59, 

1900 DATA at the side of the pool ,0,60, 0, 58, at the bott 
om of some steps ,59 ,0,0, 0, on a balcony looking out over 

the floods, 0,0, 62,0, on a diving board , 63, 0,0,61 , at the 

end of the board ,0 ,63 ,0,0 
1910 DATA by a reception desk. A sullen looking lady 
frowns at me, 21 ,65,0,0, in a large hall full of tables, 6 
4, 0,66,0, at the end of the hall. People are dining, 0,67 
,0,65 
1920 DATA at the end of a long bar , 66 , 0,68, 0, at the far 

end of the bar. The barman is asleep , 0, 69, 0,67, in a lo 
unge,68,71 , 70, 72, in a toi 1 et ,0,0, 0,69 , i n a lounge. All 
the tables have been pushed to one si de ,69, 0, 0, 
1930 DATA in an al cove , , , 69 , 0, at the entrance to the 
'Royal Holdavian Ice Caverns ', 0, 22 , , , i n a vast gloomy 

cavern. Water drijs down the wal 1 s , 75 , 0, 0, , at the 
end of the gloomy cavern. A dead body lies on the floor 
,85,74,76,80 

1940 DATA in a wide passage lit by torches in the wall, 
0,77, 0,75, in a twisty passage, 76,0, 78,0, i n a winding pa 
ssage, 79,0,0,77, in a small chamber , 88, 7B , , , by a subte 
rranian waterf al 1 ,84 , 81 , 75,82 

1950 DATA on a narrow ledge at the side of the water 
f al 1 ,B0,83,0,0,paddl ing in the water. It's too deep to 
go further ,0,0, 80,0, at a dead end , 81 , 0, , , i n a narrow 
passage which is blocked to the north by a large boulde 
r of ice, 0,80, 0,0 



1960 DATA in a cavern of solid ice, 0, 75,0,0, in the refe 

rence section. A book lies open DN a page showing som 

e 'Ice Caves ' ,0,0,6,87, in the reading room. A sign read 

s 'SILENCE ' ,0,0, 86,0, at the end of a gloomy passage, 89, 

79,0,0 

1970 DATA in a small chamber. There's a narrow ravin 

e to the north. ,0,88, 0,0, on a narrow ledge. There's a r 

avine to the South and I can just make out a passa 

ge, 91 ,0,0,0, in a passage deep inside the mountai n , 0, 90, 

93,92 

1980 DATA in a small cavern where passages lead Dff i 

n all directions, 97, 96, 91 ,0, in a tunnel lined with stra 

nge car vi ngs , 94 , 95 , , 91 , i n a vast underground chamber, 

,93, 0,0, in a cavern where the stalagtites are enormou 

s,93,0,0,0 

1990 DATA in a small office. It seems strange to find 

an office here ! , 92, 0, ,0, in a man made corridor. The w 
alls are lined with pi asti c ., 0,92,0,98, i n a wide pass 
age which bends to the east ,0, 99,97,0 

2000 DATA in a glass corridor lit with fluorescent tube 
s, 98, 100, 0,0, by a sheer wall of ice. A thick rope ha 
ngs down from above , 99 , , , 0, i n a small room chamber. T 
here's a sheer drop here. A rope hangs over the edge, I 
t's fastened to a metal ring 

2010 DATA 0,0, 102,0, in a wide passage, 0, 103,0, 101 , i n th 
e hall of the 'Mad Emperor of Holuria'. He is here 
1 ! ! ! ,102,0,0,0 
2020 DATA " " 
2030 DATA that's far too dangerous , It ' s far to heavy to 

lift, I'm sorry I don't speak the language, I'm sorry I 
don't seem to understand you!, It's stuck, I climb up, I 
climb down, I'm not hungry thank you 

2040 DATA Sorry. That word is not in my vocabulary , AAAG 
GGGHHHH it got me!, What a stupid suggesti on ! , I already 
know that dummy!, I'm nearly there, I don't have the key, 
Sorry. I don't have a clue, Time is running out 
2050 DATA I'll try it if you like, I wouldn't recommend 
i t ! , How ugly it looks!, Not Bloomin' Likely ! , How dare y 
oli speak to me like that ! , Don ' t be so rude!, It said yo 
u are a stupid ######, It's already open dummy! 
2060 DATA It's locked !, O.K. , something happened!,! see 
something there, It gleams br i ghtl y , What fun, That's far 
too dangerous here!, It's too hard, I've nothing to do th 
at with, I'd need a shovel 

2070 DATA the Emperor himself !,103,a litre of beer, 68, 
a bar of soap, 70, a large sui tease, 64 , a small key, 65, a s 
ailing dinghy, 53, a padlock , 35, some dri f twood ,54 , a small 

puppy , 23, some ice, 85, a rusty nail, 16 
2080 DATA a pair of swimming trunks, 58, a nest, 20, a cup 
of cold tea, 32, a table, 66," ",64, a lever, 98, a gun, 47, a 
bullet, 2, a little girl who looks lost , 36, EMPEROR , 1 , HOLU 
R I A , 1 , L I TRE , 2 , BEER , 2 , BAR , 3 , SOAP , 3 

2090 DATA SUITCASE, 4, KEY, 5, SAILING, 6, DINGHY, 6, PADLOCK, 7 
, LOCK, 7, DRIFTWOOD, B, WOOD, B, PUPPY, 9, ICE, 10, NAIL, 11 , TRUNK 
S , 1 2 , NEST , 1 3 , CUP ,14, TEA , 1 4 , TABLE , 1 5 , D I AMOND ,16, LEVER , 1 7 
,GUN, 18, BULLET, 19, GIRL, 20 
2100 PEN 3: PAPER 2 

2110 LOCATE 10,2: PRINT" Death of 
2120 PAPER 0: PEN 6: LOCATE 8,5: 

Game for the Amstrad CPC" 
2130 PAPER 5: PEN 3: LOCATE B,10: 
ucas 1984" 
2140 RETURN 
2150 CLS: PEN 
a Dictator" 
2160 LOCATE 2,5: PEN 0: PRINT" After years of saving, I 

booked my holiday on the sunny island of Kol in 

the Mediterranean." 
2170 PRINT" I've had nothing but trouble since arr 
iving! A strike at the airport delayed my departu 
re. It hasn't stopped raining since I arrived and many 
areas of the island are flooded." 

2180 LOCATE 2,20: PEN 3: PAPER 1: PRINT"Press the <Spac 
e Bar> to continue" 

2190 A*=INKEY*: IF A*<>" " THEN 2190 
2200 CLS 

2210 PRINT"When I awoke this morning, I found that the 
island had been invaded by the mad Emperor of Holoria, 

who is demanding thefamed 'DIAMOND OF KOL'." 
2220 PRINT"He is reputed to be in hiding somewhere on t 
he island and is threatening to blowthe island up if hi 
s demands are not met" 

2230 PRINT: PRINT"Most of the inhabitants seem to have 
been killed and therefore I must take onthe task with 

just your help!" 
2240 PRINT: PRINT"You must give me instructions in the 

form of two word sentences such as EAT FOOD" 
2250 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT"Press the <Space Bar > to start t 
he game" 

2260 a*=INKEY*:IF a*<>" "THEN 2260 
2270 RETURN 

22B0 CLS: PRINT" That's blown it!" 
2290 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT X* 

2300 PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PAPER 1: PEN 3: PRINT"Do you wan 
t to play again <Y/N> ?" 

2310 a*=INKEY*: IF a*="y" OR a*="Y" THEN RUN 
2320 IF a*="n" THEN PRINT: PRINT: PRINT"Goodbye. 

you for playing": END 
2330 GOTO 2310 



a Dictator" 
PRINT" An Adventure 



PRINT" 



Steve W. L 



PAPER 1: LOCATE 10,2: PRINT "Death of 



thank 



10 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



Touch Down for Mind Games? 



Mind Games, from a software com- 
pany already well known for their 
strategy and adventure games, have 
released a simulation of American Foot- 
ball. 

American Football was unknown in 
this country until a few years ago when 
Channel Four started coverage of 
games in the USA. This initial coverage 
sparked off interest and has resulted in 
a dedicated band of followers in the UK. 

The Mind Games version of 
American Football is a full feature 
simulation of a match between two 
teams — either human against human 
or human against the machine. The 
game has full colour hi-res displays of 
the playfield and keeps a full statistical 
record of the game — the Americans 
seem to be very pre-occupied with 
statistics of games, what's wrong with 
a 2-1 away win? 

The main method of play is 
regimented formations of players 
smashing into each other trying to inch 
the ball over the other team's line. The 
complicated manoeuvres of the men are 
more like a game of chess than a violent 
clash between two teams of modern 
day gladiators. It is this strategic and 
tactical bias to the game that lends it to 
computer implementation. 

American Football has a 1 6 page 
booklet supplied with it to explain the 




complex rules and techniques in the 
game. 

American Football is for the 48 K 
Sinclair ZX Spectrum at £7 .99 or Com- 
modore 64 at £9.99. 

Mind Games, APS Group, 1 Golden 
Square, London W1 R 3AB. 



Alice Through The Video Screen 



Alice in Video/and is finally on sale by 
Audiogenic after a long delay. 

Alice in Video/and was originally writ- 
ten by an American company, but they 
were unable to continue with it, so 
Audiogenic took over the completion of 
the program. 

The game is really a suite of games, 
each with different stages. The start up 
graphics are excellent and a very realisitc 
picture of Alice is drawn. The theme 
throughout the whole game is good 
graphics, with some stunning scenes. 

Audiogenic are continuing their policy 
of producing their most lengthy games on 



disc with Alice, which is only available on 
disc and will not be converted for any 
other machines. 

Pegasis is another new one from 
Audiogenic and will be available on both 
tape and disc. 

The object of Pegasis is to fly your 
winged horse around the screen, jousting 
with the baddies who are also mounted 
on flying horses. The graphics are also 
very good in this game. Both games are 
for the Commodore 64 . 

Audiogenic, 39 Sutton Industrial Park, 
Reading, Berks. 




GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



Express Programs at Menzies 



Program Express is a new idea in soft- 
ware distribution where the program 
gets recorded while-u-wait in the shop. 

Program Express is a new Scottish 
company that is supplying EDOS equip- 
ment to computer shops. Menzies are 
taking five of the machines with a 
possibility of more to follow. 

EDOS stands for Electronic Distribu- 
tion Of Software and has a main com- 
puter in the shop that has a main store 
of all the games inside it on a hard disk 
that can contain about 20000 K of pro- 
grams and information on the products. 
When you want a game the machine 
will individually program the cassette, 
disk, or cartridge in your computer or 
video game's format. 

The unit is quite large and has eight 
slots for cartridges along the left side 
with other slots for cassettes and dif- 
ferent kinds of disks on the right. In the 
centre of the unit is a TV screen where 
advertising, presentations, and 



demonstrations of the games can take 
place. There is also a keypad for interac- 
tion with the unit. 

The whole system is very large and 
has a number of these units called 'in- 
store computer/programmers' con- 
nected to a vast central computer 
which is in turn connected to the soft- 
ware houses and the head office of the 
company concerned. 

There are numerous advantages to 
this system. A shop need never be out 
of stock of a popular game, it can never 
overstock an unpopular game, and 
games can be out on sale quicker, the 
same goes for modifications of existing 
games that have bugs or errors in. 

At present distributors take a lot of 
the cover price of a cassette or car- 
tridge. With this new system the middle 
man is almost eliminated as the soft- 
ware house has direct contact with the 
retailer. This should lead to cheaper and 
better software. Distribution costs are 




New Adventure For Atari/CBM 64 



Allrian Data Services are broadening their 
horizons with Atari software for the Com- 
modore 64. 

Allrian Data Services are well known 
for their range of imported American soft- 
ware, including their controversial 'Strip 
Poker' game, which raised a few 
eyebrows! 

Ten of Allrian's 30 Atari titles have 
already been converted and more are on 
the way. The latest game is called Gwen- 
dolyn. This game runs on either the Atari 
or CBM 64, the Atari must have at least 
40K of memory. Discs are necessary and 
the program is so huge that it only just fits 
onto a Commodore 64 disc and takes up 
two Atari discs! 

The upshot of having such a large pro- 
gram is 150 (phew!) full hi-resolution 
screens in an adventure to rescue the im- 
prisoned damsel. The adventure us billed 
as being 'non-violent', nothing gets killed 
— not even the player. To get from one 
section to another a puzzle must be solv- 
ed, if you can't solve the puzzle then you 



must have done something wrong or 
forgotten something earlier on in the 
adventure. 

Also released for the Atari and Com- 
modore 64 is Drawpic. This is a suite of 
programs coming on cassette or disc and 
the application, (no prizes for guessing) is 
graphic design. Where Drawpic is dif- 
ferent from most graphics designers is 
that the documentation and programs 
allow the userto include the pictures in his 
own program. So if you have a great game 
with sprites flying all over the screen, 
Drawpic might be able to help you create 
a masterpiece of a backdrop. 

Gwendolyn costs £14.99 for the 
CBM 64 and £16.96 for the Atari. 
Drawpic costs £14.99 for the CBM 64 
and £ 1 8.45 for the Atari. Both programs 
are on disc, but a cassette version of 
Drawpic is under development costing 
£14.99. 

Allrian Data Services, 1000a Ux- 
bridge, ffayes, Middx, UB4 ORL 



still not totally eliminated though, blank 
tapes, disks, cartridges, and inlay cards 
still have to be shunted around. The 
blank tapes etc. will have Program Ex- 
press' logo on. 

Last Christmas there was such a 
shortage of everything that even a terri- 
ble program would sell if it was 
available. If this year is a repeat perfor- 
mance then it will be the shops with this 
new system that will win. 

Program Express, 23 Dalmeny St, 
Edinburgh EH6 8PG. 



Super Software from 
Supers oft 

Supersoft, the Harrow based Com- 
modore software company, are laun- 
ching what could be described as the 
most complex but playable space game 
yet. 

Interdictor Mk III is a game for the 
Commodore 64 and a measure of its 
complexity is the instruction manual. 
The manual is over 50 pages in length 
and goes into great detail of the Inter- 
dictor development prototype pro- 
gramme. Each page has approaching 
2000 words on it, diagrams are 
throughout. An interesting twist to the 
manual is that at no time does it ever let 
on that you are operating a computer — 
it looks and reads like any forces train- 
ing manual. One suspicious corner of 
the cover has the words 'second edition 
2138' on it. Has Supersoft discovered 
time-travel? 

Interdictor pilot is for the Com- 
modore 64 and is available on tape or 
disk. 

Also from Supersoft is a Z80 cross 
assembler for the Commodore 64. 
Mikro is possibly the best machine code 
development tool ever created for a 
Commodore machine. It makes writing 
machine code very easy and it is simple 
to use. If you want to write games pro- 
grams seriously you must program in 
machine code as BASIC doesn't have 
the speed to do anything good. 

Mikro helps in the development of 
machine code for the Commodore 64, 
VIC, or Pet. Mikro only works in 
6502/6510 machine code (that's the 
machine code that Commodore 
machines understand). 

Computers like the Spectrum and 
the Amstrad use something called Z80 
code. Wouldn't it be nice to develop 
games on the Commodore 64 using 
Mikro and having them run on a Spec- 
trum? Supersoft have just done that. 
Their new Z80 Mikro cross-assembler 
allows you to write a Z80 machine code 
program on the Commodore 64 and 
then run it on a Z80 based machine. 
This kind of thing will be a boon for 
Spectrum owners who want to develop 
games commercially, but can't due to 
the limitations of the Spectrum. 

There is a possibility of more cross- 
assemblers for other processors if this 
one is a success (perhaps a 68008 for 
the QL?). 

Mikro for the Commodore 64 and 
VIC 20 costs around £50 and is on car- 
tridge. Mikro 80 will be for the Com- 
modore 64 on cartridge although no 
price has been announced. 

Supersoft, Winchester House, Cann- 
ing Road, Wealdstone, Harrow, Middx 
HA3 7SJ. 



12 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



SOFTWARE 




Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



Micro Power 
£7.95 g 



Another world war has destroyed the 
earth (yet again!) and from the radio ac- 
tive rubble humanity, has emerged as 
primitive cave men. You would have 
thought that the holocaust was enough 
for the survivors to endure, but no — 
they now have to kill off the ever in- 
creasing population of 'Krackats'. 
These are mutant turtle-like creatures 
whose diet is that of warm human 
flesh. 

To kill the 'Krackats' you must crush 
them with the pieces of rock that form 
the maze walls. A boulder will move 
unless it is blocked by another rock in 
which case it will be crushed. If the 
boulders do not hit the 'Krackat' then 
they will bounce back towards you — 
so beware. Also if you do not hit the 
'Krackat' straight on it will move back, 
avoiding the rock and letting it bounce. 

Certain rocks contain 'krackat eggs' 
which if crushed give a bonus, other 
rocks contain left over atomic bombs 
and if an attempt to move these is made 
another holocaust results. The 
background radiation is also on the in- 
crease and if it gets too high then you 
die. 



As well as the normal type of play, 
you have the option of a hayfield or in- 
visible play. In the hayfield some of the 
rocks you can walk over and others 
form the walls of the maze. With an in- 
visible maze it is just what the name 
suggests and it is very difficult to judge 
what rock is where. 

This is another variation on the 
PENGO theme (software companies 
take note — can we have some original 
arcade software and not variations on 
games that are already out) and very 
enjoyable to play. 



flllllfiaii 






BYf.KHo CK 





BLOCKBUSTER 



Runs on: BBC 
Made by: Micro Po 
Price: £7.95 



The elixir of life has been promised to 
whomever can accomplish a difficult 
task set by the leprechauns. You are 
Harvey, a foolish young rabbit, who has 
decided to attempt this. 

You must bounce on every rock on 
the giant's causeway and change the 
colour of it. While doing this you must 
avoid being hit by the cascading balls 
and the guano dropped by the albatross 
flying overhead. 

You must also avoid Reynard the fox 



by jumping on one of the spinning discs 
which will take you to the top of the 
causeway whilst he plummets to his 
death trying to follow you. You can gain 
bonus points by bouncing on one of the 
"mischievous little creatures" who 
leave a trail of dirty footprints. The foot- 
prints also have to be bounced on to 
change them to the correct colour. 

On higher levels the rocks have to 
bounced on twice. This is made more 
difficult as a squirrel keeps turning them 
back to their original colour. The keys 
are difficult to use at first, but soon 
become easier. 

The response time is a little slow, but 
this problem can be overcome if you 
plan ahead. This is an enjoyable varia- 
tion of the arcade game Q •* BERT. 




Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



BBC 

Visions 

£7.95 




There are a number of 'Pengo' type 
games around and of the few I have 
played this is definitely the best. Pengi 
is a pacman type game but with a few 
extra features. 

You control a chubby penguin who is 




GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



13 



SOFTWARE 



trapped in a maze made of ice cubes, 
pursuing you are strange beasts called 
snowbees (no relation to honey bees). 
The snowbees do their best to catch 
you and take away one of your three 
lives. Against the snowbees you have 
two defences. Firstly you can kick an 
ice cube into them. This involves runn- 
ing up to the chosen cube and kicking it, 
the ice cube then travels in the direction 
in which it was kicked until it hits 
another ice cube, then it stops. Any 
snowbee in its path is killed. Your se- 
cond defence is to stun them. This is 
achieved by kicking the perimeter fence 
of the maze, any snowbee touching the 
fence is stunned and can be trampled. 

Control of the penguin is by 
keyboard only, the keys are a little 
tricky but fortunately can be redefined. 
There are no skill levels as such but 
there are apparently limitless screens 
and a useful practice mode. 

Pengi is an excellent game which is 
highly addictive, sound and colour are 
used well. I look forward to new 
releases from Visions. 



ROMIK SOFTWARE^ 

PRESENT 

BIROS 0FPR& 

POR THE B.B.C " WODEL_A_un 



sgggaWS 15 




Runs on: Electron 
Made by: Romik 
Price: 

The on screen instruction for Birds of 
Prey merely repeats what you get on 
the card insert, which is a bit disappoin- 
ting. I would have preferred a loading 
screen with a display of potential 
enemies and scores. The initial game 
screen supplies information on the cur- 
rent level of difficulty (1 to 4 ), a top five 



14 



scoreboard (plus the level at which it 
was achieved), and the sound on/off 
options. 

The game itself involves knocking 
off a considerable number of standard 
Galaxian like creatures with your laser 
base. It turns out to be spell-binding 
stuff with debris and creatures pouring 
down the screen, some of them 
harmless, some of them capable of 
quickly dispensing with your three lives. 

The aural warnings of oncoming 
Death Bombs and the nightmare of 
picking out the screaming Kamikaze 
birds from amongst the other debris, 
bullets and Circlers, are the highlights of 
what should have been an ordinary 
game but which has that addictive 
quality. 

It's certainly quick enough. Level 
four is very rapid indeed and the relaxed 
pose taken up on level one gives way to 
tightening around the shoulders, in- 
tense concentration and a thumb twit- 
ching on the joystick button (the game 
is one of those compatible with the First 
Byte joystick interface). 

Keyboard controls are three in 
number only and so easy to handle. 
Your possible rate of fire also increases 
with the levels so it isn't all bad as you 
progress. You soon learn strategy for 
(say) mopping up stragglers at the end 
of a screen by moving parallel to their 
flight before firing. 

One strange occurrence: after about 
1 games two Circlers blew up at the 
same time and the whole game froze, 
had to be terminated and reloaded. Not 
to worry and no chance of spoiling a 
splendid all action game for the Elk. 



STOCK C 




Runs on: BBC 

Made by: Micro Po %., 

Pric 7.95 

Stock Car involves driving a small car, 
or cars in the two player game, around 
1 of 6 tracks. This may sound a bit pet- 
ty but in fact it's great fun. The game 
would be no fun if there was no opposi- 
tion, and fortunately there is. The jam 



cars (three of them) swerve in front of 
you every time you go to overtake. 
What makes the game even more 
outstanding is the two player option. 
For this you choose the option followed 
by the number of laps you want and 
which circuit. In the two player game 
there is only two jam cars — the third 
being made by your opponent, who is 
also trying to be the first to the che- 
quered flag. 

The number of the track you choose 
does not refer to its difficulty, I found 
track three the hardest because of its 
tight hairpin bends. There is one other 
factor you can determine at the beginn- 
ing of the game and that is skidding. 
You decide whether to have oil patches 
and how much you skid when corner- 
ing, I found about 10% was the most 
realistic but for beginners 0% is more 
advisable. 

Control of your car is by joystick or 
keyboard, but joysticks give no advan- 
tage over keyboard control. There are 
four controls, left, right, up a gear, and 
down a gear, you have four gears, 1 
and 2 are used mainly for starting mov- 
ing after a crash, and gear four is for 
roaring down the straights. 

The graphics are not stunning but are 
colourful and adequate, the sound is 
also kept to a minimum but is perfect 
for the job. I think Stock Car is a well 
thought out game and I'm already ad- 
dicted. 



PSYTRON 



I1UII9 4 

Made 
Price: 



nd P 




Runs on: ZX S| 
ade by: Beyond 
£9.95 

Beyond boasts that the game stands up 
top class programs such as Jetpac, The 
Hobbit and Psion's Scrabble. The game 
certainly equals, and probably beats, 
them. 

The Psytron controls the massive 
Betula. 5 Installation (consisting of 
the medical unit, freezetime, oxygen 
unit, docking bay and teleport centre, a 
recycling unit, pleasure dome, crew's 
quarters and many more) packed into 
ten superbly drawn screens. It will cope 
with defensive demands which will 
leave the human brain unhinged and 
computer circuits scrambled. 

The first level is the droid mode. You 
are a droid and must destroy saboteurs 
who are teleported down from the alien 
ship. The aliens take the form of tri- 
pedroids because of their three-footed 
nature. There is a time limit of 300 
seconds and then the score and the 
average are given. Then you play this 
screen again until you have played it 
five times and the average is greater 
than 50%. If this is true you will be per- 
mitted on to the second of the 6 levels. 
This has you controlling some sights to 
gun the alien craft down. This con- 
tinues as the first one until permitted on 
to screen 3. An excellent game. Highly 
recommended. 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



SOFTWARE 



ns on: 



MbJ| 



Commodore 

Mogul 

£8.00 




The scenario of this game is based 
around the loyalty of the last remaining 
soldier ant whose queen has just been 
captured by a band of renagade scor- 
pions and has therefore the perilous 
task of having to rescue her. 

The ant's movements are controlled 
by the direction of the player's joystick 
(it would have been useful to allow for a 
keyboard option as the manoeuverabili- 
ty of the ant could be hampered by the 
failings of a well used joystick, during a 
frantic chase). 

There is only one skill level but as 
each screen is traversed the problems 
and mazes posed become progressively 
more complicated. The basic object of 
the game, that runs through each of the 
different screens is that of collecting 
the certain key that opens the specific 
door that could lead to the next screen, 
or the door that leads to another key. 

To add to the game, the keys can on- 
ly be taken in a specific sequence. So, 
passing over one key may have no ef- 
fect whilst another may then be used to 
open a yellow door, revealing either the 
exit, another yellow barrier or some 
vital life preserving substance! 






Runs on: 
Made by 
Price: 



BBC 

Visions 

£5.95 




There is very little that can be said to 
describe this game. You are on the 
ultimate shopping trip — you take 
everything. You move up the screen 
floor by floor avoiding getting hit by the 
lifts that move up and down. 

The number of lifts and the speed at 
which they travel increases as you com- 
plete more and more screens. At higher 
levels there is more than one lift per lift 
shaft and using some new law of 
physics they allow lifts to go up and 
down in the same shaft. 

The use of graphics is very good but 
the sound lets the program down. Like 
many games now coming on the market 
it asks if you want music while it loads. 
If you select yes it plays what is at first 
a very nice tune but it continues even 
when the main program has been load- 
ed. There is no way of stopping it ex- 
cept by pressing break. 

There is little skill involved in this 
game as your only controls are left and 
right — but younger users might enjoy 
it. It got a bit boring after the first few 
levels. 



Run 

Made 
Prii 



BBC 

Virgin Games 

£7.95 



So far, I managed to work my way 
through 5 of the screens, but with only 
3 lives, considerable practice will be re- 
quired as an action in the wrong se- 
quence, results in the loss of a life, i.e., 
not collecting the oxygen, crossing the 
water without building a bridge, cross- 
ing bad water etc. Then there is the 
ever daunting presence of the 3 scor- 
pions, whose touch is fatal and who oc- 
cassionally change colour and double 
their speed of movement. As an aid, 
there is on each screen, a spade shaped 
podule, which once taken allows the 
ant to pass over the Scorpions unharm- 
ed, for a period of 1 5 seconds. 

On the whole I found this to be a 
very exciting and addictive game. 



Brainstorm is a two player grid based 
game. The players attempt to destroy 
each other's brain situated on opposite 
sides of the screen. To do this there is 
only one method, laser refraction. This 
may sound complicated but in fact it is 
easy and unentertaining. 

Each player places one electro- 
prism on each of his turns, or alter- 
natively he may fire his laser. Electro- 
prisms are like mirrors, they deflect 
laser beams in a set direction. To place 
a prism only requires co-ordinates and 
then a number from 1 to 8 which deter- 
mines in what direction the laser is 
deflected. The number corresponds to a 
compass direction (NE or South etc). To 
fire your laser you just move it up or 
down and fire. The laser beam travels 
until it hits a prism when it is deflected. 
A laser beam can travel through up to 
25 prisms or until it leaves the grid. If it 
hits any brain then the score is altered 
and the grid is reset. 

There are three grids to choose from 
and the length of time which the laser is 
visible can be set. The graphics and 
sound are below average so in my opi- 
nion unless you are desperate for a 
game, leave Brainstorm alone. 




■-■ ■■"it r-i i'<*i A IF ^==: 




superior to the Spectrum game. Jack 
must refuel waiting spacecraft by fet- 
ching fuel pods from the far side of the 
screen/hangar, and returning to the 
space ship. The screens (5 of them, 
selected at start of each game) are not 
as barren as those of Jetpack and each 
one is different. To stop you from per- 
forming your task are various nasty 
creatures ranging from bats to living 
balloons which send you crashing down 
to earth when you cross their path. 

Control is by joystick or keyboard, 
the keys are in sensible positions and 
respond well, the joystick offers no 
great advantage. The graphics are col- 
ourful and are generally flicker free, one 
complaint is Jack's movement is not as 
smooth as it could have been. 

A moderate idea has been made into 
a very playable game which is very ad- 
dictive. Jet Power Jack is well worth 
the money to anyone who likes a 
challenging game. 



tEMOLATOR 



tons on: 
side by: 
rice: 



BBC 

Visions 

£7.95 



I 



Demolator has been widely advertised 
by Visions so I took it for granted that it 
would be good. I was wrong. Demolator 
involves you controlling a robot around 
a cargo bay of a space freighter. Your 
mission is to stop the invading 
demolators (unfriendly robots) from 
stealing your important cargo — 
humans. The demolators have different 
roles, some steal the humans from their 
life support (frozen) chambers while 
others simply attack you. 

Control is by one of a choice of 
methods and even though the keys may 
be redefined I found a joystick easier. 

After clearing all the enemy in each 
phase you progress to a harder but very 
similar one. For those who want to get 
good at the game there is a practice ver- 
sion of the game on the 'B' side of the 
cassette. 

Although the game is colourful and 
sound is acceptable there is no real en- 
joyment and its addictive qualities are 
nil. 




,CK 



Runs on: BBC 

Made by: Micro Power 

Price: £7m^ 

As the name suggests to those ac- 
quainted with the Spectrum games 'Jet 
Pack', Jet Power Jack is not very 
original. Despite that, this version is 



CORPORATE CLIMBER 

Runs on: BBC/Electron 
Made by: Dynabyte Software 
Price: £ 7 .9^1^^^^^ 

This has to be one of the simplest (in 
terms of strategy) games available for 
the BBC Micro or Electron. There are 
two different versions since the BBC 
game on an Electron is painfully slow 
and jumpy. However the Electron game 
does not achieve the speed of the BBC 
and results in a lesser challenge for the 
expert player but no less fun. 

The game begins with the choice of 



a number of game playing options, in- 
cluding the ability to turn off the sound, 
an entirely necessary option for those 
who don't like the little computer ditty 
trilling away in the background while 
they are trying to concentrate on the 
matter in hand. Why don't they use the 
much nicer lower volume registers of 
the sound chip? 

The matter in hand involves controll- 
ing the climber with left and right keys 
as he makes his way from level to level, 
unable to stop moving in either direction 
in his struggle to the top. The only 
respite is at the start of each level 
where he may halt before venturing out 
into the cut and thrust world of point 
scoring objects and lifts which can 
'ping' the climber back to his starting 
point at the cost of one life. 

Since the climber is always on the 
move and so are the lifts, anticipation 
and strategy come into the completion 
of a screen successfully and the unique 
accolade of 'engaging' the lavatory at 
the top of the climber's tree. 

As you can tell, the game has a cer- 
tain humorous aspect. The screen is all 
go with a time bonus ticking away, an 
indication of blood pressure which 
seems to accurately reflect the players 
current state of mind! and a motley 
assortment of objects for the climber to 
collect on his ascent, including a 
telephone, a cup of tea, a key, and an 
acorn. You have five lives to get as far 
as you can in this software rat race and 
will undoubtedly enjoy every one of 
them. 




_ ACORN 

CORPORATE" 
CUMBER 6 





a bit dodgy. By comparison a BBC uses 
300 or 1 200 baud, a Spectrum uses 
1 500, and an Oric uses 300 or 2400. 
The cassette deck is on the side of 
the keyboard. This is good for easy ac- 
cess but does mean that it is difficult to 
put the unit on your lap for easy typing. 
Even if you could the two leads to the 
monitor are only about eight inches 
long, which makes things difficult. 



Keyboard 



The Amstrad computer comes as a 
two part package with the keyboard 
and cassette deck in the first box with a 
monitor and power supply in the other. 
A monitor is a kind of television that can 
only be used with a computer, give a 
better picture, and cannot pick up 
broadcast signals. 

There are two monitor options: a full 
colour RGB type, and a green screen. 
The full colour monitor is like a small 



80 column mode on this screen is 
perfectly readable and it might be worth 
getting this version of the Amstrad as 
it's £100 cheaper and getting the TV 
modulator box later for playing games. 
The TV modulator box has its own 
power supply and will drive a television 
set just like a normal computer. This 
means that the green screen version of 
the computer can be bought at the 
cheaper price and you can use a TV to 
play games on. 

In Built Cassette 

Also inbuilt into the package is a 
cassette recorder. This is a standard 



The actual keyboard itself is very 
good. The feel is almost up to the ex- 
cellent quality of a Commodore 
keyboard and is as good as a BBC. 
There are three clusters of keys. The 
main keyboard which is very well laid 
out with a quad sized enter key and a 
full space bar. All the control keys are 
around the edge and are colour coded. 

The 1 2 key numeric key pad, which 
isn't really a numeric keypad at all. The 
number keys are along the top as usual 
and the extra keys are actually function 
keys, the keys come pre-defined as 
number keys which is an excellent idea. 

The last cluster is the cursor keys 
which are formed in a square with the 
copy key in the middle. This is a nice 
touch and makes editing easier — 
which it needs as the editor on the 
Amstrad is awfull. 

An editor is a way of changing a 
program that you have typed in. A good 
editor is very important for somebody 
that is new to computing. The best 
editors are found on the Atari, Adams, 
Einsteins, and Commodores, these are 
called screen editors and are very 
easy to use. The worst types are 
called line editors and are found on 
Spectrums and Dragons. These are very 
difficult to use. The BBC micro has a 
cross between the two called a twin 




television — in fact the tube is a stan- 
dard TV tube and doesn't give the 
definition of a dedicated RGB monitor. It 
can just about resolve 80 columns, but 
not very well. The 80 column mode of 
the Amstrad can get quite tiring on the 
eyes with the colour monitor. 

The green screen monitor is quite 
good — having a custom monitor tube 
similar to those used for long periods by 
programmers and word processor 
operators who don't need colour. The 



audio cassette recorder with a few 
modifications for using computer tapes. 
One thing that Amstrad missed was 
having a computer controlled digital 
cassette deck. The Commodore deck is, 
and has a lot of computer control over 
it, it's 100% reliable, and can be push- 
ed to 8000 baud. The Amstrad device 
needs to be told by the user when the 
play button is down, it has two speeds: 
1000 baud and 2000 baud, the 1000 
baud rate is quite reliable but the 2000 is 



cursor editor or a copy editor, the Oric 
has something similar although more 
primitive. 

The Amstrad has a similar version of 
the BBC editor which is very difficult to 
use. The Commodore/Atari screen 
editor is very good to use and was 
specifically designed for computers. 
Line editors are a throwback from 
teletype editors where you could only 
work on one line at a time. I wish that 
computer manufacturers had more 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



17 




sense, an editor is the interface bet- 
ween a computer and the user — it 
must be good, the Amstrad one just 
doesn't come up to scratch. 

Graphics Ability 

The graphics are quite good — three 
modes with up to 16 colours. The first 
mode is 640 by 200 in two colours, the 
second mode is 320 by 200 in four col- 
ours, and the last mode is 1 60 by 200 
in 1 6 colours. All colours are selected 
from a palette of 27 plus any two col- 
ours flashing. Due to good memory pag- 
ing the hi-res screen is hidden under the 
Basic ROM in a similar manner to Com- 
modore 64 hi-res screens. Further pag- 
ing is carried out on the RAM for basic 
programs. This leaves up to 42K of 
RAM for the user whatever hi-res mode 
he is in. 

This memory paging idea is very 
good as it allows a good 32K long Basic 
interpreter to co-reside with a 1 6K 
video screen and 48K of Basic RAM. 
This gets past the worst features of 
some of the most popular competing 
computers such as the BBC with a good 
Basic but little RAM and the Spectrum 
with a lot of RAM but a very poor Basic. 

The graphics are on a par with the 
BBC but with a greater choice of col- 
ours (16 on the screen at once from a 
choice of 27 instead of 1 6 from 8) 
though the Commodore 64 still has the 
edge with its different graphics modes, 
sprites, and multiple screens. These 
graphics knock the Spectrum for six — 
we can expect some really great games 
for this computer soon. 



Music To My Ears 

The sound generator is a more basic, 
but similar, one to that used in the 
Taitung, Oric, and other popular 
machines. The sound is produced 
through a tinny little speaker in the 
keyboard unit. There is, however, a 
good volume control on the side of the 
cassette deck and a headphone socket 
on the back of the machine. We found 
that the voltage level through this 
socket wasn't enough to drive a set of 
walkman headphones without an 
amplifier. A very nice feature is that the 
socket is wired for stereo, this is 
because, like most sound chips, the 
Amstrad has three sound channels. This 
means that it can play up to three note 
chords. On the Amstrad the first chan- 
nel is designated as the left channel, the 
second as the right channel and the 
third comes through on both. This is an 
idea that was first used about five years 
ago on a computer called the DAI but it 
didn't catch on. I hope that software 
houses use this great feature as it has a 
lot of potential. 

Beautiful Basic 

The Basic is very good, it is very 
BBC-like, having procedures and other 
structures. There are some extra 
features as well which improve con- 
siderably on Acorn's original. Interrupt 
handling is supported from Basic as 
standard. At this point I should explain 
about interrupt handling. An interrupt is 
a way of stopping a program in mid 
flow. Doing something else. And then 
returning again to where you stopped 
off. There are various interrupt options, 
three timers that operate every 50th of 
a second, and the sound queues. The 
sound queues allow music and sound 




effects to be played whilst a program is 
running. When the music has run out an 
interrupt will happen telling the com- 
puter to 'top up' the sound chip for 
more music. 

One thing that is very bad, and inex- 
perienced users will find it a great pro- 
blem, is spaces between words in a pro- 
gram are compulsory. Spaces in a pro- 
gram use up memory, and if you are 
getting heavily into a programming ses- 
sion at 2am and you are wondering why 
your latest masterpiece will not work, it 
is very annoying to find that the culprit 
is the ommision of a mere space. 

The Amstrad's connections with the 
outside world are not as impressive as 
the BBC or Commodore 64 but they are 
there. There is a parallel printer port, a 
disk drive expansion port, monitor 
socket, power, headphones, and 
joysticks. 

The printer port will drive most 
popular printers. The disk expansion 
port is the one that all extra add-ons will 
have to hang on. There is the promise of 
disks to put on this port and this is 
where the 'up to 240' sideways ROMs 
will have to be put. There is little need 
to put 240 ROMs on but some people 
will want to put in quite a lot as is 
demonstrated by some BBCs that I have 
seen. 

The Joy of Joysticks 

The joystick port is the connection 
that will be of greatest interest for the 
games player. It is a single 9 pin D con- 
nector similar to those used by Atari 
and Commodore, but with one impor- 
tant difference. There is only one 
socket but it is possible to plug in two 
joysticks as long as you use the 
Amstrad ones, this is because the 
Amstrad joysticks have the usual stick, 
fire button, suction cups, and long lead. 
However, on the base of the stick is a 
socket where another joystick can be 
plugged in, thus allowing two joysticks 
to be used! 

Overall the Amstrad is a very in- 
teresting machine. Its excellent 
graphics ability and very good (and 
stereo) sound make it a promising 
games machine. A lot of software com- 
panys are producing software for the 
Amstrad, so watch out for Jet Set Wil- 
ly, Fred, and Booga Boo the Flea. 

The one thing that may put it out of 
most peoples bracket is the price: £229 
with green screen and £329 with col- 
our. For games you really need a colour 
screen and if you are going to get a TV 
modulator to use with a colour Tv then 
why bother with a monitor that adds 
£70 to the price anyway? The same 
could be said for the cassette recorder 
although I always have prefered a 
dedicated unit without all the connec- 
ting leads and mains wires, and a 
dedicated unit wouldn't add a lot to the 
price (especially as they are made by 
Amstrad themselves). 

To sum up I think that the Amstrad 
could have wiped the whole computer 
market clean if they had dropped the 
monitor and cassette recorder and 
released the computer for around 
£1 50. As it stands it will still emulate 
the success of the BBC micro, especial- 
ly as it is following in the Beeb's 
footsteps with a similar spec machine 
(although without the support and op- 
tions available with the Beeb). 



18 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



THE WAY FORWARD FOR THE TI 99/4 A 



Lantern. Games That Shine 



SOFTWARE FOR THE TI 99 4A 



NOW AVAILABLE.. .NEW FULL COLOUR PACKS 




SEND S.A.E. FOR FULL LIST 



HUNCHBACK HAVOC 

Guide Egor through his 
masters cattle. 24 
different screens. 



CRAZY CAVER 

Superb graphic! and 
animation you won't 
want to it op playing. 
12 Screens. 



NEW RELEASE 




TIBASIC £5-95 



£6-95 




WONKEY WARLOCK 

A viscous dragon hat 
stolen the Crown of Zol, 
5 sheet* of graphics 
action. 



NEW 
RELEASES 

BUILDER/MINEFIELD 1 




MINEFIELD 

T5l 



TIBASIC £5-95 



Two fabulous g air. us !■ 
the price of one! 




ti-basic £4-95 



LRNTERN 



Send cheque or postal order to' 

4 HAFFENDEN ROAD TENTERDEN 
KENT TN30 6QD. 




Defeat the Klingon Invasion fleet. Includes 5 skill 
levels. Hi-res graphics. Quadrant display. 8x8 galaxy 
phasors. photon torpedos. Long range scans and 
much more. Full instructions included. 

Only £6.50 Inc.. p & p 

Send cehque or P.O. or telephone with Access / Visa for immediate despatch. 



Apex Software M 



Hastings Road, St. Leonards-on-Sea, East Sussex 
TN38 8EA, Tel Hastings (0424) 53283 
Trade Enquiries Welcome 








Dear Sir, 

Two of the main Dragon Users Groups, 
Games and Computers of Wareham 
(who seem to have disappeared) and 
The Dragon Dungeon (who are no 
longer trading) are now unable to pro- 
vide the service previously available. 

In the past many people have sent 
cash to user groups only to get little or 
nothing in return, we are prepared to of- 
fer A FREE OF CHARGE enrolment to 
The Cuthbert Club, which is 
Microdeal's own user group to anyone 
wishing to join. ..all they need do is 
write to us at the following address, for 
their free badge, quarterly magazine 
hint sheets etc. 
Yours faithfully, 
John Symes 
Microdeal Ltd. 
41 Truro Road, 
St. Austell, 
Cornwall PL 25 5JE 
Telephone: 0726 3456 




Dear Editor 

I am writing in reply to Stephen Joyce's 
letter in your June issue. I am afraid that I 
cannot help you with 'Savage Island', but 
I have almost completed 'Pirate's Adven- 
ture'. 

The key to the door is located under 
the mat in London . The mat is nailed down 
and to remove the nails you will need the 
clawed hammer from the cave that joins 
the hallway that was mentioned in the let- 
ter. 

Give some rum to the pirate in the 
grass shack as this will make him leave. 
When he's gone, open the chest with the 
keys. Here you will find a map and a plan 
for a boat, TAKE these. Get the water 
wings from the cave by the hallway and 
swim along the lagoon. 

When you've crossed the lagoon you 
must grab some fish and feed the 
crocodiles (this will take a few goes as the 
fish keep drying up) . When the crocodiles 
have been suitably fed they will let you 
unlock the door. The door leads to the 
hallway, this is the way to carry the sails 
and other objects from the cave to the 
beach. You must look at the plans to 
decide what you need. To find the anchor 
look in the lagoon. 

Build the boat and wake the pirate in 
London. Return to the boat and type 'set 
sail'. 

On treasure island, walk 30 paces in 
the field and dig (get the spade from the 
pirate's island). You should then find the 
first treasure. It is in a box that can be 
opened with the clawed hammer. 

The other treasure is in the monastry, 
but it is guarded by some snakes which 
refuse to let me reach it. 



This is as far as I've got. Oh, don't 
bother using the mongoose onthe snake 
— it turns out to be a squirrel. 
Simon Burford 
Middx 

Out of all the letters that we received, 
Simon got the furthest. Can you improve 
on this? I'm sure anyone who hasn't got 
very far is dying to be given some more 
hints! 




Have you got any opinions to air, has someone somewhere upset you and 
you want to grizzle and gripe? Or maybe you're full of the joys of spring 

and feel like telling a happy story? 

Whatever you want to say, be it good, bad or indifferent drop us a line 

here at Games Computing and get it off your shoulders. 

Send your letters to: 

'Postman Pat', Games Computing, 1 Golden Square, London W1 . 



Dear Sir or Madam, 

I would be grateful if you would mention 
the formation of the Independent Coleco 
Adam Users Club in your magazine. We 
are a national club specializing in the Col- 
eco Adam computer system. 

We aim to offer the following to 
members: 

Newsletter (1 issues per annum) 

Articles 

News 

Reviews 

Program Listings 

Hints and Tips 

Problems and Answers 

Software Library 

Area meetings around the country. 

Users, owners and potential owners of 
the Coleco Adam computer system are 
welcome to write to the club at the ad- 
dress below. Prospective members are re- 
quested to enclose a stamped, self- 
addressed envelope if asking for member- 
ship details. 
Yours faithfully 
David Winnett 

Independent Coleco Adam Users Club, 

20 Wordsworth Close, 

Towcester, 

Northamptonshire, 

NN12 7JU. 



20 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



DRAGON 32 



1% nn |% cT/S^^ Available Through; Good Distributors & Retailers 
#^ISK#\2ftX»V^ Including. J.MGNZIGS.TIGGR Distribution. SDL. 

ATOUCH OF MAGIC AlSRASCOThe Grange Barn. PikesGnd. eastcote. Middlesex HA5 5GX.Tel: QI 866955t 




By Ian Livingstone 



250K of pure mystery. Be the first to know. 
Send your name and address to: Eureka 1, 228 Minister Road, London SVY6 6AZ 



Missile Silo is an adventure game that 
runs on the Commodore 64. The 
scenario is an American missile base 
and you are Russia's best KGB agent. 
Your mission is to 'hack' into their com- 
puter and stop the launch. 

Commands are transmitted to the 
computer the usual verb/noun format. 
Verbs that can be used are Look, Eat, 
Drop, Consume, Use, Repair, Put, 
Shoot, and Inventory. Most words have 
an abbreviation of three letters or so. 

A useful hint is 'look at everything 
carefully'. 

There is a time limit on this adven- 
ture as the missile will be launched in 
36 minutes! 



RUNdown 

Lines 

65-128 
130-143 
150-280 
290-310 



320-700 

800-1999 

2000-2020 



Action 

Define title display 

Centre titles 

Print titles 

Await response of 

user or continue after 

time delay 

Instructions 

Set up data 

Give time remaining 



2030-2125 


Positioned 


2500-2620 Check on guards 




information display 


2630-2640 Wait ' 


2130-2380 


Accept input and 


3000-9380 Verbs 




check for errors 


9800-9890 Check end game 


2390 


GOTO lines 


11000 


Inventory 




depending on which 


14000 


-14170 Look 




verb was used 


15000 


-15380 Out of time 


2400-2540 


Check on space 


18000 


-18110 Security check 




disease and death if 


19000-20010 Win game 




necessary 






2550 


Alter clock 


Variab U >e 


2551 


Check to see if you 








have space disease. 


IL 


Health * 


'- 


if so then increase 


TL$ 


Titles 




your level of illness 


TL 


Tab position of titles 


2552 


Print current health 


RR$ 


Name of room 




condition 


RN 


Room to north 


2554 


Check to see if time 


RS 


Room .to south 




has run out 


RW 


Room to west 






RE 


Room to east 






00$ 


Name of object 






OG 


Whether object is gettable 






OM$ 


Message on object 






OP 


Position of object 






CC$ 


Abbreviation of object 






VB$ 


Names of verbs 






HR 


Time left 






CR 


Current room number 






IN$ 


Input 


jKr^^^^k 




V$ 


Input verb 


1 • ^1 


m^r ^\ 


VN 


Verb number 


./*.' • 


TW * \ 


N$ 


Input noun 






NN 


Noun number 






L$ 


Illness message 




wB^BH* 


G 


Guard status 


■k_Jf'm 


at 


Nl 


Number of items being carried 






A$ 


Picture of rocket 




e,t 




i-ie&st 







/ 





« ■ 



^"^^%c ■ 



i 



-*-*: 



vftSSS-k 




5 REM ANDREW READ l 14. 12. S3 

7 P0KES32B8 , 1 3 1 P0KES3281 , 1 S I PR I NT » ■" i 

18 PRINT"n" 

19 RESTORE 

61 f1T-lNT<RHI)<TI>*2)+l:IL-2 
68 REM TITLE PA0E8 

78 TLt<i>«" MTrrn r— 

88 TL*<2>"" I I I —I —1 I I r~ 

98 TL*<3>«" 

188 TL*(4)»"I — r I n 
118 TL*(5)" ,,— 1 II I I 
128 TL*<6>-" 

125 TL*<7>-"AUTH0R I A. R. READ" 

126 TL*<8>-"— •■«——•••••" 

127 TL*<9>«"*»* MISSILE SILO *»•"' 

128 TL*<10>-"#» OOOD LUCK ##" 
138 TL< 1 )'LEN(TL*(2> > I TL( 1 >»28-CTL< 1 V2> 
148 TL<2>-LEN<TL*(5>) :TL<2>-28-<TL<2>/2> 

141 TL<3>»LEN<TL*<8>>:TL<3>-2e-<TL<3V2> 

142 TL<4>-LEN<TL*<9>>:TL(4)-20-<TL<4V2) 

143 TL<3>-LEN<TL*<ie>>:TL<3>"28-(TL<SV2> 
145 PRINT")«mW"; 
158 PRINTTAB<TL(1)>TL*<1> 
168 PRINTTAB<TL<1>>TL*<2> 
178 PRINTTAB<TL<1))TL»<3> 
188 PRINT 

198 PRINTTHS<TL(2>UL*(4> 
288 PR1NTTAB<TL<2>>TL*<3> 
210 PRINTTAB<TLC2>>TL«<6> 
220 FOR I«l TO 26 

240 FOR J-l TO 28 i NEXT J 

250 NEXT I 

268 PRINT:PRINT 

278 PRINTTAB(TLC3)>TL*<7> 

288 PRINTTAB<TL<3>>TL*<8> 

290 FOR J-l TO 508 

388 GET I*: IF I*«" "THEN 328 

310 NEXT J 

328 PR I NT "3" J 

350 PRINT" VOU ARE A RUSSIAN SECRET AGENT FIND 

368 PRINT"VOUR MISSION IS TO DESTROV AN AMERICAN " 

370 PRINT"MI8SILE SILO BEFORE IT CAN LAUNCH ITS 

380 PRINT"WEAPONS AOAINST VOUR COUNTRV. " 

390 PRINT'PRINT" VOU COMMAND THE COMPUTER IN PLAIN 

480 PRINT"ENOLISH. WHEN THE COMPUTER ASKS VOU WHAT" 

410 PRINT"TO DO VOU MUST ANSWER WITH A VERB " 

428 PRINT'FOLLOWED BV A NOUN OR ADJECTIVE. (VOU 

438 PRINT"NEED ONLV ENTER THE FIRST TWO LETTERS OF" 

448 PRINT"EACH BUT VOU MU8T LEAVE A SPACE BETWEEN " 

458 PR I NT "EACH WORB>." •-. 

460 PRINT: PR I NT "PRESS -|-jPACE"' TO 00 ON."'*' 

470 OET I*: IF I*<>" "THEN 478 

488 PR I NT "S"; 

490 PRINT" HERE IS A LIST OF VERBS THAT VOU CAN " 

308 PRINT"U8E BUT VOU MUST FIND OUT THE NOUNS FOR " 

510 PRINT"VOURSELF. " 

520 PRINT: PRINT 

53B PRINT"JLO«)K ,i 

340 PR I NT: PR I NT "MM" 

330 PRINT:PRINT"«5EBT" 

360 PRINT:PRINT"«DRBOP" 

570 PRINT:PRINT"KOWSUME" 

588 PRINT:PRINT"«USK" 

390 PRINT:PRINT"KE»>AIR" 

610 PRINT"! 

620 PRINT"PU«railM"; 

630 print" eHBOTninmimir ; 

636 PRINT"«N*/ENTORV - THIS TELLSHIM 

637 PR I NT "WHAT VOU HAVEMIIHIHIIMDi" ; 
636 PRINT"ON VOU (NOMMMMIIN" ; 
639 PRINT"NOUN IS NEEDED)" 

648 pri nt" mu mamme aaummaait' 

638 PRINT"PRES8 'WACE1' TO 00 ON" 
668 QET I« : I P !«<>" "THE N 668 

680 PRINTTAB<TL<3>>TL*<18) 

683 PRINT:PRINT:PRINT 

690 FOR J-l TO 988: NEXT J 

780 PRINTTAB<TL<3>+S)"V0U'LL NEED IT II 

800 REM INITIAL SETTINO UP 

810 DATA COMPUTER ROOM, 4, 2, 5; 0/0 

823 DATA LABORATORY 1,0,3,0,8 

830 DATA STORE ROOM, 0,8,8, 2, 8 

848 DATA CLEANING CUPBOARD, 8, 1,0,8, 1 

850 DATA MISSILE SILO, 0,0, 9, 1,8 

868 DATA RADIO ROOM, 7, 0,0, 5,0 

870 DATA NUCLEAR SHELTER, 0,6, 0,8,0 

880 DATA SLEEPING QUATERS, 8,6,7,8,8 

890 DATA NORTH, 8, 3, 10, NO 

90B DATA SOUTH, 8, 0,18, SO 

910 DATA WEST, 0,0, 18, WE 

928 DATA EAST, 8, 0, 18, EH 

938 DATA BOXOF RED PILLS, -1,0, 3, PI 

940 DATA BOTTLE OF LIQUID, -1,0, 3, LI 

938 DATA SILVER KEV,-1,8,3,8I 

968 DATA VELLOW POWDER, -1,0, 2, VE 

970 DATA ORAPHIT£(CARBON>,-1,0,7,OR 

988 DATA SALT PETRE,-1,B,2,SA 




x\ 




998 DATA PETRI DISH, -1, A BACTERIA C0L0NV,2,PE 

1880 DATA OOLD KEV, -1,8, 1,00 

1818 DATA B00K,-1 

1820 DATA M/ 0UNPOWER IS COMPOSED OF CARBON, SALT PETRE AND SULPHUR'", 3, BO 

1030 DATA CANISTER OF 0AS,-1, 'DANGER-MUSTARD GBS',4,CA 

1840 DATA COMPUTER WITH ORANOE BUTTON, 8, 'SERIAL NO. ,1,C0 

185e DATA MALLET, -1,8,1, MA 

1868 DATA CHISEL, -1,8, 3, CH 

1078 DATA GUARDS, 0,0, 8, GU 

10S0 DATA BATTERV,-1,8,8,BA 

1898 DATA SWORD, -1,8, 8, SW 

1100 DATA EXPLOSIVE DEVICE, -1, THAT IT IS A DUD, 7, EX 

1110 DATA DETONATER,-1,0,2,DE 

1128 DATA GASMASK. -1, A TINV H0LE,3,0A 

1138 DATA LEAD SHOT, -1,8, 3, LE 

1148 DATA FLINT LOCK, -1,0, 6, FL 

1130 DATA PUNCTURE REPAIR KIT, -1,0,6, PU 

1168 DATA "LOCKED DOOR", 8, 0, 1, DO 

1170 DATA "ROOM", 0,0, 10, RO 

1180 DATA MISSILE, 8,"U.S. A ON IT", 5, MI 

1200 FOR 1-1 TO 8 

1210 READ RR*<I> 

1220 READ RN(I):READ RSCI) 

1230 READ RW(I):READ RE<I> 

1240 READ RLCI) 

1230 NEXT I 

1233 DIM OO*<30>, 00(30), OM*^30),OP<30>,CC*<30) 

1260 FOR 1-1 TO 29 

1270 READ 00*CI) 

1280 READ 00(I):READ OM$<I) 

1290 RERD OP(I):READ CC*<I) 

1380 NEXT I 

1310 DATA "LO","GO", ,, GE","DR","CO","US","RE","PU","SH","PR","IN" 

1328 FOR 1-1 TO 18 

1338 READ VB*(I> 

1348 NEXT I 

1358 CR"l:NI-0:HR»36 

1998 CP=INTCRND(TI)*e999)+1000:CP*»"M2 n +STR»(CP:':OM*a5)=OM$(15:)+CP*+"'" 

1999 TI*-"080880" 
28B0 REM GAME 
2010 PRINT":]" 

2820 PRINT" »"HR"II MINS TILL LAUNCH" 

2830 PRINT :PRINT"VOU ARE IN THE ";RR*CCR> 

2040 PRINT:PRINT"EXITS ARE :"; 

2030 IF RN<CRX>8 THEN PRINT" N" 

2068 IF RS<CRX>0 THEN PRINT" S" 

2070 IF RW<CR>O0 THEN PRINT" W"; 

2080 IF RE<CR)O0 THEN PRINT" E" 

2098 PRINT:PRINT:pRINT"VOU SEE:" 

2100 FOR J-I TO 29 

2110 IF OP<J)"CR THEN PRINTOO*<J> I 

2128 NEXT J 

2123 IF 1-0 THEN PRINT"NOTHING AROUND VOU" 

2130 PRINT: INPUT "WHAT DO VOU WANT TO DO "; 

2140 L»LEN<IN*):V«-"" 

2130 IF IN*-"IN" THEN VN«11:00T0 2390 

2160 FOR J-l TO L 

2170 C*-MID«(IN*,J,1> 

2180 IF C*-" "THEN 2198 

2183 V*-V*+C*:IF LEN<V«>-2 THttl 2218 

2190 NEXT J 

2195 PRINT:PRINT"I DON'T UNDERSTAND" 

2196 FOR J-l TO 689: NEXT j:QOTO 28BB 
2218 FOR 1-1 TO IB 
2220 IF V*-VB*<I> THEN 2248 



PRINT: 1-8 
:l-l 



^ 



^ 



2230 

2235 

2248 

2268 

2278 

2290 

2295 

2388 

2318 

2328 

2338 

2340 

2350 

2368 

2378 

2375 

2376 

2388 

2390 

2400 

2420 

2430 

2440 

2450 

2460 

2470 

2480 

2490 

2500 

2510 

2520 

2538 

2540 

2550 

2551 

2552 

2553 

2554 

2560 

2570 

2580 

2598 

2600 

2610 

2620 

2630 

2635 

2636 

2637 

2640 

3000 

3001- 

3009 

3018 

3011 

3015 

3016 

3020 

3038 

3040 

3500 

3510 

3520 

3530 

3532 

3533 

3540 

3550 



D" X ^ 



NEXT I 

OOTO 2195 

VN-I:N*="" 

X-0:FOR I-J TO L 

C*=MID«(IN*,I,1> 

IF C*=" " THENX=l:G0T02328 

IF XOl THEN 2328 

N*=N*+C* 

IF LEN(N*>-2 THEN 2350 

NEXT I 

PRINT: PRINT" I DON'T UNDERSTAND 

OOTO 2196 

FOR J-l TO 29 

IF N*=CC*<J>THEH 2380 

NEXT J 

PRINT :PRINT"I DON'T UNDERSTAND" 

GOTO 2340 

NN=J 

ON VN GOTO 3000,3300,4080,4500,5000,6000,3000,8508,9090,9300,11000 

IF IL>-1THEN 2550 

IF IL>-3 THENL»*"SI'M FEELING A LITTLE ILL" < GOTO 2550 

IF IL>-5 THENL$="SI FEEL ILL" :GOTO2550 

IF IL>-7 THENL*-"M FEEL VERV ILL":GOTO 2550 

IF IL>-8 THENL*="SI'M VERV, VERV ILL":GOTO 2550 

IF IL>-9 THENL*="ai'M DVEING":GOTO 2550 

IF IL<-10 THEN 2550 

print" TUMmmtamim" 

TV*="**«* VOU'RE DEAD ****" 

TV=C20-CLEN(TV*)/2)) 

PRINTTRB(TV>TV* 

FOR J=l TO 100 

NEXT .1 

PRINT : PRINT: PRINT: PRINT CLR: END 

HR=36-ai/3600):HR=HR*100:HR=IHT<;HR):HR=HR/100 

IF OP<11>O0 AND IL<1 THEN IL=IL+3 

IF L*<>""THENPRINT:PRINTLJ 

L*="" 

IF HR<=0 THEN 15000 

IF CR=8 AND G=0 THEN 0=1 

IF G=l THENPRINT:PRINT"SYOU HAVE AWOKEN THE GUARDS" 

IF G<>2 THEN 2638 

TV*-"**** THE GUARDS ATTACK AND KILL VOU ****" 

PRINTTV* 

GOTO 2520 

IF G=l THEN 0=2 

PRINT:PRINT"PRESS 'SSPACEB' TO CONTINUE" 

GET I*: IF I*<>" "THEN 2636 

IF OPO1)=0 THEN IL=IL-1 

OOTO 2000 

IF NNMTHEN 3889 

GOTO 14000 

IF0P<NN>O8AND0P<NN>OCRTHENPRINT"SI CAN'T SEE IT.":GOTO 2H088 

PRINT PRINT" I SEE " 

IF NN028 THEN 3020 

FOR I=1T029:IF OP<I>=CR THEN PRINTOOt(I) 

NEXT: OOTO 3840 

IF OM*«NN)="0"THEN PRINT"NOTHIHG SPECIAL" ' GOTO 20000 

PRINT OM*<NN>"." 

GOTO 20000 

1=0: IF NN=1 AND RN<CR>O0 THEN RC=RN<CR) : 1=1 

IF NN=2 AND RSCCRJO0 THEN RC=RSCCR> i 1 = 1 

IF NN=3 AND RW<CR)08 THEN RC=RW<CR> : 1=1 

IF HN=4 AND RE<CRX>0 THEN RC=RE(CR> ! 1 = 1 

IF RC=9 THEN 18000 

IF RLCROO0 THEN PRINT: PRINT" IT i S LOCKED": GOTO 2 0e 8 

IF 1=1 THEN PRINT :PRINT"O.K":CR=RC: OOTO 20000 

PRINT:PRINT"I CAN'T GO THERE" :GOTO 20080 



24 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



4000 IF0P<HN)OCRAND0P<0P<:NN>X>CR THEN PRINT"»I CAN'T FIND IT. " :GOTO23800 

4002 IF 0G(HN)=e THEN PRINT :PRINT"I CAN'T GET THAT !":Q0TO 20000 

4035 IF OP<NN>=0 THEN PRINT : PRINT" I'VE ALREADY GOT IT ! " : GOTO 20000 

4006 IF NI=8 THEN PRINT :PRINT"Y0U CAN'T CARRV ANV MORE":GOTO 20000 

4010 OP<NN>"0:PRINT:PRINT"O.K":NI=NI+1:GOTO 20000 

4500 IF OP(NN)<>0 THENPRINT:PR1NT"I HAVH'T OOT IT TO DROP I" : GOTO 20000 

4510 OPCNN)»CR 

4520 PRINT :PRINT"O.K" 

4525 NI=NI-1 

4530 GOTO 20000 

5000 1=0' IF NN»5 AND MT=1 THEN GOTO 2480 

5010 IF NN-6 AND MT=2 THEN OOTO 2430 

5020 IF NNOS AND NN06 THEN PRINT:pRINT"I CAN'T EAT THAT" GOTO 20033 

5040 OP<NN)=10 

5050 IL«°3:PRINT:PR1NT"I FEEL GREAT !":GOTO 23000 

6300 IFOP<NN>=0THEN 6309 

6305 IF OP<NN)=CR THEN 6009 

6006 PRINT: PRINT" I CAN'T USE IT BECAUSE I CAN'T FIND IT" i GOTO 20303 

6007 IF OP<OP<HN>)=CROR 0P<0PCNN>)-3THEN 6009 

6039 REM 

6021 IF NN017 THEN 6371 

6025 IFOPa6>O0ANDOPa6>OCRTHENPRINT"MI DON'T HAVE A MALLET . " : GOTO23300 

6030 PRINT ! INPUT" mm DO VOU WANT TO CHISEL"; IN* 

6335 FDRJ=1TO20 

6337 IF CC*<J>=LEFT*<IN*,2>THEN 6342 

6040 NEXT J 

6341 PRINT:PRINT"I DON'T UNDERSTAND" : GOTO 20330 

6042 IF0P<-J>O3AND0P(J)<>CRTHENPRINT:PRINT"I CAN'T FIND IT. " : OOTO23300 

6050 PRINT: PRINT"*** CRACK ***" 

6060 PRINT :PRINT"THE CHISEL HAS SNAPPED" 

6073 0Pa7)=13G0T0 20033 

6071 IF NN025 THEN 6383 

6372 PRINT :PRIHT"TRV S6HB00T" 

6376 GOTO 20000 

6080 IF NN012 AND NN07 THEN 6130 

6390 IF CROl OR RL<4>=0 THEN 6123 

6100 PRINT: PRINT" IT DOSEN'T FIT THE LOCK" 

6110 GOTO 20003 

6123 PRINT:PRINT"I CAN'T SEE A LOCK TO USE IT ON" :GOTO 23330 

6130 IF NN021 THEN 6220 

6140 IF 0P<22)O21 THENPRINT"jn"HE DETONATER IS HOT ATTACHED" :GOTO20000 

6150 PRINT 

6163 FOR I=0TO IB 

6170 PRINT10-I; 

6174 V=TI 

6175 IFCTI-VX58 THEN 6175 
6180 NEXT I 

6193 PRINT PRIHT"CLICK" 

6200 PRINT :PRINT"NOTHINO HAPPENS." 

6231 GOTO 20303 

6220 IF NH022 THEN 6240 

6230 GOTO 6153 

6240 IF NN026 THEN6273 

6250 PRINT : PRINT"TRV SREH=flIR" 

6260 GOTO 20338 

6270 IF UNO 19 THEN 6320 

6280 IF 0P<19>O15 THEN 6310 

6290 PRINT: PRINT" IT IS ALREADV CONNECTED UP" 

6333 GOTO 20330 

6310 PRINT:PRINT"I HAVN'T OOT ANVTHING TO USE IT ON" :GOTO20030 

6320 IF NN015 THEN 6370 

6330 IF 0Pa3) = 15 THEN 6353 

6348 PRINT: PR I NT" THERE IS NO POWER IN THE COMPUTER" ■ GOTO20303 

6353 GOTO 19030 

6370 IF NHO23OROP<23)<>0THEN6420 

6383 PRINT :PRINT"VOU HAVE ALREADV GOT IT ONE" 

6385 GOTO 20300 

6400 PRINT :PRINT"THAT IS NOT POSSIBLE" 

6410 GOTO 20333 

6423 IF NN014 THEN 6400 

6430 PRINT: PRINT"** HISSSSSSSS **'"OP(14> = 10 

6435 PRINT :PRINT"THE GAS HAS IHSLOVED THE CANISTER!!" 

6440 IF OP<23>=0 THEN 6500 

6450 PRINT:PRINT"AAGH! ! ! GAS!!" 

6460 FOR J=l TO1500:NEXTJ:GOTO2480 

6500 IF QI"I*<23>="0"THEN 6600 

6510 PRINT :PRINT"AAGH! ! ! THE GAS - ITS COMING IN!!! A LEAK!!!" 

6520 GOTO 6460 

6533 IF CR=7 OR CR=8 OR CR=6 THEN 6600 

6540 PRIHT:PRINT"THE GAS HAS DISPERSED THROUGH AN AIR "; PRINT"VENT" 

6550 GOTO 20300 

6600 G=-l:PRINT:pRINT"fl CHOCKING, COUGHING SOUND IS HEARD IN "i 

6610 PRINT :PRINT"THE DISTANCE. THE GAS THEN ESCAPES" :00*a8> = "DEAD GUARDS" 

6620 PRINT :PRINT"THROJBH AN AIR VENT." 

6633 GOTO 23333 

8830 IF NNOZ3 THENPRINT:PRINT"IT DOSEN'T HEED REPAIRING! " : BOTO 20303 

8810 PRINT: INPUT"WITH WH AT ",IN* 

8020 IN*=LEFT*<IN*,2> 

8838 IF IN*O n PU"THENPRINTPRINT"THAT WON'T WORK ! " i GOTO 20038 

8848 OP<26)-10:OM»<23>""8" 

8858 PRINT :PRINT"O.K": GOTO 28003 

8580 IFOP<NNX>0THENPRINT:PRINT"I HAVN'T GOT IT TO PUT ANYWHERE !": GOTO20000 

8528 PRINT : INPUT "WHERE"; IN* 

8538 IN*«LEFT*<IN*,2> 

3535 IFIN*="RO" THEN J=28 i GOTO8580 

8548 FOR J=1T029 

8550 IF IN*OCC*<J)THEN 8570 

8560 GOTO 8576 

8570 NEXT J 

8575 PRINT: PRINT" I DON'T UNDERSTAND" : GOTO 20003 

8576 IF0P<J:'OCRAND0P<J:'O3THEHPRINT"»I CAN'T FIND WHERE THAT IS" :GOTO20B33 
8580 IF J028 THENS6B3 

8598 OP<NN>=CR : PRINT :PRINT"0.K": GOTO 20080 

8630 IF JOIS OR NH013 THEN 8630 

8613 0PCNN> = 15:0M*a5>=0M*<15> + " BHTTERV" 

3620 PRINT:PRINT"O.K":GOTO 23800 

8630 IF J025 THENGOTO 8683 

8640 IF NNOSAND HH09AND NHO10ANDNNO24THEN 3680 

3650 0P(NN')=25:IF QM*<25>="0"THEN 0M*<25)»"" 

8663 0M*<25>=OM*<25HO0*<NN>+" " 

3673 GOTO 3620 

8680 IF J021 AND NN022 THEN 3713 

8690 0M*C21>="DET0NAT0R" :0PC22!>=21 

8700 GOTO 8620 

3710 IF K>27 OR 0P<27)=18 THEN 8750 

8728 IF NN012 AND NN07 THEN 3750 

8725 IF CROl THENPRINT"I CAN'T SEE A LOCK ANYWHERE. " : GOTO 23330 

3733 PRINT: PRINT" IT WON'T FIT THE LOCK." 

3743 GOTO 20383 

8753 IFJ023ANDJ015ANDJ011THEN 8830 

8760 OP<NH>=J:lFOM$a> = "0"THENOMS<:.J>="" 

8773 Ot1*<J)=OM*<J>+" "+00*<NN> 

8775 PRINT :PRINT"O.K": GOTO 23833 

S883 PRINT :PRINT"I CAN'T PUT IT THERE" 

8810 GOTO 28303 

3030 PRINT: INPUT"WITH WHAT"; IN* 

9810 IF LEFT*<IN*,2>="FL" THEN 9133 

9023 PRINT: PRINT" I CAN'T SHOOT SOMETHING WITH THAT !" 

9033 GOTO 20000 

9133 IFOP'NfOOCRANDOP<NN)O0THEN: PRINT: PRINT" I CAN'T HIT IT FROM HERE.": 

9131 IFOP<NN>OCRANDOP':NHX>0THEN20033 

9105 IF OP<255=0 THEN 9150 

9113 PRINT:PPINT"I DON'T HAVE H FLINT LOCK TO SHOOT WITH!"' OOTO 20033 



fr 




w 



«& 



9153 IF0P(3;'=250R0P':24>=250R0P':9)=250R0Pa3>=25THEN 9230 

9163 PRINT :PRINT"THE DAMN THING'S EMPTY ! " 

9170 GOTO 20330 

9203 IFOP(8>=25HND0P<24>=25AHD0Pi9J=25AHD0Pa85=25 THEN 9250 

9213 PRINT: PRINT" IT'S HOT FULLY LOADED" 

9220 GOTO 23033 

9250 PRINT: PRINT"*** EAMG ***" :OPC8>»10 : 0P(9? = 13 :OPC10)=10 : OP<24 

9260 OM*<25>="0":IF NN027 THEN930S 

9270 PRINT :PRINT"THE LOCK HAS BEEN SHOT OFF AND THE DOOR" 

3230 PRINT"SWINGS OPEN." 

9233 0P<27>=18 : RL<4>=3 

9235 GOTO 20000 

3300 IF UNO 18 THEH 9340 

9313 PRINT:PRINT"A GUARD FALLS TO THE FLOOR BUT THERE ARE"; 

3323 PRINT"STILL TWO AFTER YOU." 

3330 FORJ=1TO1500:NEXTJ:GOTO 20000 

9340 IF NN<>29 THEN 9370 

9350 PRINT :PRINT"THE BULLET JUST BOUNCED OFF." 

9360 GOTO 20033 

9370 PRINT :PRINT"NO DAMAGE IS DONE." 

9330 GOTO 20000 

3800 IF NNOIS THEN 9390 

981B IF 0P(19>O15 THEN 9870 

3S23 GOTO 13338 

3878 PRINT ■ PRINT"CLICK. . . " ■ FORJ=1TO630 HEXT J 

3880 PRINT :PRINT"NOTHING HAPPENS !" 

3885 GOTO 20300 

3890 GOTO 3880 

11003 PRINT'TWr'OU HAVE :■" 

11313 PRINT: 1=3 :NI=8 

11320 FOR J=l TO 29 

11025 IF OP<J>=0 THEN PRINTOO*<J> : PRINT: i = i : NI=NI + 1 

11030 NEXT J 

11043 IF 1=0 THEN PRINT"NOTHING" 

11050 OOTO 20000 

14000 PRINT: PRINT" I SEE": IF NNOl THEN14050 

14010 IF RH<XR>=0 THEN 14040 

14320 PR1NTRR*<RN<CR>) 

14830 GOTO 20300 

14040 PRINT"H0THING":G0T0 20000 

14358 IF NN02 THEN 14100 

14360 IF RSCCR>=0 THEN 14848 

14873 PRINTRR*<RS(CR>) 

14383 GOTO 23808 

14103 IF NN03 THEN 14150 

14113 IF RW<CR>=3 THEN 14040 

14115 IF CR=5 THENPRINT"A SECURITY CHECK" :G0T0 20033 

14123 PRINTRR*(RWCCR>) 

14133 GOTO 23300 

14153 IF RE<CR)=B THEH 14040 

14160 PRINTRR*<RE<CR>> 




14170 
15003 
15310- 
15020 
15030 
15340 
15050 
15068 
15073 
15080 
15090 
15100 
15110 
15120 
15130 
15140 
15150 
15160 
15170 
15183 
15233 
15213 
15220 
15230 
1524B 
15250 
15260 
15273 
15275 
15283 
15290 
15330 
15335 
15313 
15320 
15330 
15340 
15350 
15360 
15373 
15383 
16003 
18033 
18313 
18020 
18830 
18040 
13050 
18360 
18103 
18110 
13303 
19313 
1902B 
19333 
19353 
19363 
19070 
19083 
19090 
19100 
19110 
20300 
23013 



GOTO 23380 
DIMA*<50> 
A*<2)=" I" 
A*C3>=" /"\" 
A*<4) = " I U I" 
A*<5') = " I I" 
A*<6>=" I S I" 
A*<7)=" I I" 
A*<3>=" I A I" 
A*<9::' = " I I" 
A*(10> = " I * I" 
A*ai> = " I * I" 
A*(12>=" A t t\" 
A*(13>=" II II' 
I ' 



>^v 



/ \ 



n$d4!=" 

R*<15)=" 

A*a6;'=" 
A*a>=" 

M(17! = 

A=16 

PRINT"™ 

PRINTA*(l>:PRINT:PRINT"n"; 

FOP B=l TO 6:PRINTTAB<A>A*<17 

NEXT B 

B*="SKI^SS^fiK«BirofflKKM(IS«BI«Ml 

N=24:A=fl+l 

FOR P=l TO 30 

N*=LEFT*<B*,N+1> 

PRINTN* 

FOR 0=2 TO 16 

if n+q>23 theh 15313 

printtab<a>a*<q:' 

if s=16theh printtrb<a>" 

HEXT Q 

H=N-1 : IF NO THEN 11=1 

HEXT P 

PRINT"3 5N0U HAVE FAILED"" 

PRINT: PRINT" THE MISSILE HAS EEEN LAUNCHED FROM THE" 

PRINT"THE SILO AND YOU HAVE FAILED IN YOUR 

PRINT"HISSION. THE PUNISHMENT FOR FAILURE IS " 

PRIHT"aDEATHB " 

PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT : PR I NT : END 
PRINT'TTTHIS IS A SECURITY CHECK. " 
PRINT:PRINT"VOU HAY GO NO FURTHER." 
PRINT : INPUT"WHAT IS THE PASS CODE", 
IF PC*OCP* THEN 13100 
PRINT :PRINT"CORRECT - YOU MAY PASS" 

GOTO 20803 

PRINT : PRINT" INCORRECT" ■ CR=5 

GOTO 23303 

PR1NT"T : V=160 

FOR H=l TO 250 

X=IHTCRND<TI >*1300:' + 1024 

POKE X,Y 

NEXT H 

PRINT'Tl **** CONGRATULATIONS ****" 

PRINT-PRINT" ALTHOUGH VOU SACRIFICED YOUR OWN LIFE" 

PRINT: PRINT" IN DOING SO, YOU HAVE DESTROYED THE " 

PRINT :PRIHT"AMERICfiH BASE. VOU ARE THE HERO OF THE" 

PRINT :PRINT"KREMLIN I" 

PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT 'END 

NI=3:FORJ=1T029:IFOP':J)=3THENHI=HI + 1 

HEXT J: GOTO 2408 



^V 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



25 



10 

20 

30 

40 

45 

50 

60 

99 

100 

109 

110 

129 

130 

148 

150 

160 

165 

169 

170 

180 

184 

185 

189 

190 

199 

200 

209 

210 

219 

220 

229 

230 

239 

240 

249 

250 

259 

260 

269 

270 

279 

280 

289 

290 

299 

300 

309 

310 

319 

320 

329 

330 

339 

340 

349 

350 

359 

360 

369 

370 

399 

400 

410 
415 
420 
425 
440 
450 
460 
470 
480 
490 
500 
510 
520 
530 
540 
550 
570 
590 
600 
610 
620 
630 
640 
658 
660 
670 
630 
690 

700 

710 
720 
730 

800 



Part 1. 

PQKE52; 28 : P0KE56.. 28 : CLR 

F0RI=7168T07679 

RERDfl 

POKE I, A 

pr i nt " mmmmmmmmmms" i 

NEXT I 

POKE 1 98 , 3 : P0KE632 ,147: P0KE633 .. 1 3 1 

REM***Q*BERT**# 

DRTR 195, 129,149, 149,129,195,219,201 

REM***PYRRMID*** 

DATA255 , 1 26 , 60 ,24,1 53 , 1 26 , 60 , 24 

DRTR255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 255 ,255 

DATfil,3,7, 15, 15, 15, 11,9 

DRTA0, 0,0, 0,24, 60, 126,255 

DRTA128, 192,224,240,240,240,208, 144 

DRTR231, 102,60,24, 153, 126,60,24 

DAT A 1 29 ,195, 23 1 , 255 , 255 , 255 , 2 1 9 , 1 53 

REM***BERD BERT*** 

DRTR195, 141, 169, 141, 129, 195,219,201 

DRTR195, 177, 149, 177, 129, 195,219,60 

REri***Bfll_L*** 

DRTR 1 99 , 1 63 , 65 ,65,65, 97 . 1 79 , 1 99 

REM***COILY*** 

DRTR23 1,215,223, 23 1,251 , 1 99 , 1 89 , 1 95 

REM***DEVIL*** 

DRTR66 ,0,165,1 95 , 129,1 O? ,219, 237 

REM***BOOT*** 

DRTR31,31, 17,o,0,@,fi. 16 

REM***BARREL*** 

BATA255, 129,36,36, 126,36,36, 129 

REM***MUSHROOM*** 

DflTR249, 243, 243, 23 1,231, 129, 129, 195 

REM***BROLLV**# 

DRTH199, 1,41, 239, 239, 239, 235, 247 

REM***MUSICRL NOTE*** 

BRTR23 1 , 233 , 239 , 239 , 1 43 ,15,15,1 59 

REM***PLANT*** 

DRTR 159, 87, 235. 239, 131 ,131, 199,199 

REM***FRCE*** 

DRTR 153, 165, 36, ■ 1 02 • 60 , J 53 . 195 

REM***BOX*** 

DRTR255 , 224 , 220 , 1 86 ,6,117,115,7 

REM*#*CHOPPER**# 

DRTR255 , 1 28 , 247 , 227 , 22 1 , 22 1 , 227 , 22 i 

REM#**THE BEBE*** 

DRTR 195, 129, 102, 102, 102, 129, 195, 153 

REM***HAMMER*** 

DRTR0 , , , , 23 1 , 23 1 , 2:3 1 . 23 1 

REM**#FIRE BALL*** 

BATA247,231,21.9, 181, 182,170,213,227 

REM***ROBOT*** 

DRTR193, 162, 182,213,193, 162,162,247 

REM**#BUG**# 

BRTR255 ,219,1 29 , 1 02 , 66 , 66 , 1 29 , 2 1 9 

REM***THE SHWHRZ*** 

DRTR 1 95 , 1 29 , 1 02 , 36 , 66 , 1 02 , 1 26 . 60 

REM**#THE ECKV*** 

DRTR 1 53 , , 1 02 , , 1 53 , 60 • 1 58 , 1 95 

REM#*#ST0OGE**# 

DRTR 195, 165, 165, 129, 129, 165 . 189, 60 

REM#*#CREDITS*#* 

DRTR 1 9,44, 68 , 68 , 64 , 64,65 , 65 

DflTfiO, 128, 131 , 132, 132, 130, 48, 48 

DRTR0, 0,0, 0,0, 0,0,0 

DRTR0 , ,16,1 36 , 72 , 43 , , 
BRTR64 , 7 1 , 72 , 38 , 33 , 33 , 9 , 6 
DRTR0 , 1 9 , 42 , 74 , 75 , 74 , 82 , 34 
DRTR0, 188, 16, 16, 144, 19, 19, 16 
DRTfl60 , 1 26 , 23 1 , 1 95 , 1 95 , 224,112 , 56 
BRTR28 , 1 4 , 7 , 195,1 95 , 23 1 , 1 26 , 60 
DRTR30 , 63 , 1 1 5 , 96 , 96 , 1 1 5 , 63 , 30 
BRTR30 , 63,115 , 97 , 97 ,115,63, 80 
DATA55 , 63 , 1 89 ,176,176,1 76 , 48 , 48 
DATR7 , 1 43 , 1 56 ,31, 3 1 , 28 ,15, 7 
DRTR 1 28 ,192, 224 , 224 , 224 ,0,192,1 92 
DRTR243, 243, 9? , 127, 127, 97, 243, 243 
DRTR207 , 207 , 1 34 , 1 34 , 1 34 , 1 84 , 207 , 207 
DRTR7 ,15, 3 1,61,57 , 57 , 1 23 , 255 
BATR 191,1 59 , 207 , 68 , 36 ,12, 6 , 3 
DRTR0 , 30 ,18,54 , 38 , 38 , 38 , 62 
DfiTflO , 4 , 1 2 , 1 2 , 1 2 , 1 2 , 1 2 , 1 2 
DRTR0 , 60 ,4,12, 28 , 48 , 48 , 60 
DRTR0 , 60,4,12,60,12,12 , 60 
HRTR0 , 36 , 36 , 44 , 60,12,12 , 1 2 
DRTR0 , 60 , 32 , 43 , 60 , 12,1 2 , 60 
DRTRO , 60 , 32 , 48 , 60 , 52 , 52 , 60 
DATA0 , 60 ,4,4,1 2 , 12,12, 1 2 
DAT AO , 60 , 36 , 44 , 60 , 44 , 44 , 68 
DRTR0 , 60 , 36 , 44 , 60 ,12,12 , 68 
DRTR252 , 246 , 226 , 67 , 65,192, 96 , 48 
DRTR68 , 1 02 , 66 , 66 , 82 , 78 , 1 02 , 6 1 
BRTR0 , 206 , 1 68 , 284 , 1 68 , 206 , , 1 28 
DRTR0 , 206 , 1 64 , 1 96 ,164, 164 , , 
DRTR2 1 6 , 284 , 230 ,127, 63 , 6 , 1 2 , 24 
DRTR 192, 224 , 240 , 1 20 , 56 , 56 , 184 , 252 



Part 2. 
5 HI=@ 
9 REM#**SET 



VARIABLES*** 



10 

15 
20 
50 

60 
70 

99 

180 

105 

110 

128 
130 
140 
150 
160 
170 
1 80 
190 

200 

210 
220 
230 
240 
25w 
26Q 
270 
280 
298 
500 
510 
515 
517 
520 
530 
539 
680 
610 
699 

700 

785 
718 
720 
730 
740 
750 

760 
770 
779 
780 

800 

310 

830 
340 

85(3 



i ■ POKE 



LB=0 : 8C=0 : M=5 

pRiNT"n": poke: 

E(1) = 10:E(2)==11 : 0=140 

81=36875=82=36874 

P0KE36878, 15 

0=30720 

REM***PRINT PYRAMID*** 

PR I MI " c«lt»»9»»»pftl3 1<~ ! flSB 

PR I NT " m *)■»»»»»!»»» MWTi " 

PRINT"l»W*»iillCBE" 

PRINT"|iii*MlW»F" 

PRiNT"(i»iiiinm ii" 
PR i nt " »i»»ii>ir;BGBE " 

PRINT »I»I»§»F F" 

PRINT"«i>»MID D D" 
PR I NT " MMtiiMCBGBGBE 
PRIHT"Wi»illllF F F" 
PRINT"h»i»»*HB D Ii B" 
PR I NT " WMMCBOBGEGBE " 
PRINT"J*§ll»iF F F F" 
PRINT"M»WHD D D Ii B" 
PR I NT " WiiWCBGBGBGBGBE 
PRINT"I*»»F F F F F" 

PRiNT"Wii»iB n ii n u n 

PR I NT " HWOGBGBGBGBGB 

PRINT"»IMF F F F F F 

B(1>=7756:BC2)=7756 

Q=8087 

PRINT' , »KWite'<)*+" 

PRINT">" 

pr i nt " mummmh -mmmik 
pr i nt " mmamamv' ; h i ; n nr 

PR I NT " i* !H m 9 m H IHSHI9 Sit sins. 
PR I NT " H>»il»|i|i»»MiKiD " 

REM***MR I N PROGRAM*** 
PRINT"HW»ir;SC 

PR I NT " SrWiS&SMBMHi&mK 
REH***MOVE BERT*** 
J=PEEK(197) 

I FJ=32THENP0KE 1 98 , : Wfl I T 1 9 
IF.T=48THENP0KEQ, 2 : POKEQ+C, 
IFJ=33THENP0KEQ, 2 : POKEQ+C, 
IFJ=13THENP0KEQ, 2 : POKEQ+C, 
IFJ=29THENP0KEQ, 2 : POKEQ+C, 
IFO-IK 1 >ORQ=E(2)THEN3800 
I FPEEK <: Q+22 > =6THENSC=3C+ 1 8 
POKEQ, 8 : POKEQ+C, 2 
IFPEEKCQ-22>O4THEN3080 
REM***MOVE NRST I ES*#* 
F0RZ=1T02 
K=INT(RNIK1)*2)+1 
IFX*1THENP0KEB<Z) , 2 : POKEBC 
I FX =2THENP0KEB <2) , 2 : POKEB ( i 
POKEB ( Z) , E <Z) : POKEB C Z ) +C , 2 
IFB'::Z)=QTHEM3000 
IFB <Z ) >8 1 20THENPOKEB < Z ) , 32 
NEXTZ 

F0RX=1T0G:NEXTX 
REM***SELECT NASTIES*** 
IFL.B=21THENE<l)^E(l) + i:E<2 
IFE( 1)=28THENGOTO3170 
GOTO60O 

REM**#TONES**# 

POKES2,200 

F0RT=1T018'-NEXTT 

P0KES2, 160: POKES 1,168 

F0RT=1T05:NEXTT 

POKES 1,0:POKES2,0 

RETURN 

REM***END OF GRME*** 

F0RT=1T015 

F0RH=8TC© 

PGKES2,0: POKES 1,200 

POKEQ, N 

Fi:iRP=lTO50:NEXTP 

POKES 1,0: POKE: 

HEXTN 

NEXTT 

POKES 1 , : P0KES2 • O 

M=M-1 :IFM==OTHEN3100 

I FPEEK 03-22 ) =4 THENPOKEQ , 2 




OSUB20OO 
OSUB20O0 
OSUB2080 
SUB20M0 



GU 



Q-Q-67 
Q=Q+65 
Q-Q-65 
Q=Q+67 



G0T0758 

GOT 0750 
G0T075O 



,.B=LB+1 :pQKEQ+22, 1 : POKEQ+ 



2+C2 



888 
899 

900 
9 1 
970 
1999 

2000 
201S 

2038 
2040 
2058 
206O 
2999 

3000 

30 1 

3020 

3030 

3035 

3040 

3050 

3060 

3070 

3080 

3085 

P0KEE(2>,2 

3090 POKEQ 

2 : GOTO280 



'■' +C 
'i +C 



B(z: 






: 60SI IB;: 

: gosub; 



ooo B<2)-B<25+S?; 
000 B<2)=B' Z -+67 



)T0 1 80 




160 



PC 



<E B(2; 
: POKEB' 



' 2 : G0T02I 
, 2 : POKEB 



(EQ+C 



: POKEB a :> , 2 : POKEB a )+C 



: POKEB 1 



: POKEB' 



:'+C, 



3100 

3110 
3120 
3130 
3140 
3150 
3160 
3170 
3180 



F0RII=1T07 

READS, U 

P0KE36876,S 

FORF==1TOU*50 

NEXTF 

NEXTD 

P0KE3687S ■ 6 

RESTORE 

IFSOHITHENHK- 




3 1 90 PR I NT " :*I>M!>»»i»i|l»iB!!i|i»»l!i»i}il:iy-l I T 

3200 pr i nt " a(!i'ii;M(!>»»tiiiiiniiiiii»piiii»iiiarFi 

3300 PR I NT " ^■. r ">:'"!' , x)i»>|iitl»l|iiSi»Bi|i|»»|il|:H!:»:: 

3480 POKE 1 98 ■ o : Wfl I T 1 98 , 1 

3510 PRINT"3sIfl«J***9l!M*IH|!»M(ii| 

3520 PRIHT"SI«i | M?I*li|i»HH«»»BlJi&Ji«iiiH " 

3530 PR I NT " $!:«Ii!lKloltIi:>DMiS»||i|H«|>|i|ii»|i|| 

3540 GOTO 10 

3599 REM***DATfl FOR TUNE*** 

3600 IifiTA225,4,215.2,215,2,213,4,215, 



EVH" 



4 



This game for the unexpanded VIC 20 

casts you as a small round furry character 

from the planet Alpha Centuri (called 

Kubert, or Bert to his friends). Bert just 

happens to be jumping around a pyramid, 

I for no apparent reason. You score points 

1 for each hexagon of the pyramid that you 

(jump on. When all the hexes have been 

covered a new pyramid appears. 

If all this sounds easy — you're in for a 
shock! There are snakes slithering and 
balls bouncing around the pyramid all try- 
ing to harm you. Also if you fall off the 
pyramid you die. You have five lives to 
play with (remember you are from Alpha 
Centuri, and small round furry things have 
five lives there). 

Controls 



Q: Left and up 
Z: Left and down 



P : Right and up 

, : Right and 
down 



Space pauses the game. 

When typing in this game, type in pro- 
gram one first and save it on tape, then 
type in and save program two. To run the 
program load and run the first program. 
The hi-res graphics will then set up and 
the second program will be loaded 
automatically. 

RUNdown 

The program is divided into two parts in 
order to fit into an unexpanded VIC. The 
first program defines the high resolution 
graphics and is self explanatory. The se- 
cond program is as follows. 



Line 

5-70 
100-560 

600-610 

700-770 

780-880 

900-910 

2000-2060 
3000-3540 

3600 



Action 

Initialize variables. 
Print out the pyramid 
and credits. 

Print score and men left 
at the top of the screen. 
Move Bert and check if 
he has jumped off the 
pyramid or hit a nasty. 
Move nasties and check 
their position. 
Check if all the dots have 
been collected. 
Tones for movement. 
End of game/Play 
tune/Wait for key to be 
pressed. 
DATA for tune. 



Variables Used 



HI 
LB 

SC 

M 

E(1)andE(2) 

S1 

S2 

C 

B(1)andB(2) 

J 

Q 

G 



Hi-score. 

Number of dots col- 
lected. 
Score. 
Men left. 

Characters for nasties. 
Voice one. 
Voice two. 
Colour. 

Position of nasties. 
PEEK for key pressed. 
Position for Bert. 
Counter variable. 




Conversion Clues 



Here is a list of memory locations and their 
functions featured on the VIC. Other 
computers will have Basic words to cover 
these features. 



Location 

36878 

36869 
36874/5/6 



7168- 
7679 



Function 7680- 

Volume control (0 to 8185 

15). 197 
Used to select user 
defined graphics. 

The three sound POKE 

channels (0 to 127 on 198,0: 

each channel). WAIT 

298,1 

Memory locations for 52-56 
UDGs. 



Screen memory. 
Current key being 
pressed, equivalent 
to GET. 

Waits for any key to 
be pressed. 



Alter H I MEM /RAM - 
TOP. 



Summer holidays are over again; the 
nights are drawing in — soon it will be 
winter. So to cheer you up here is Lou 
and Les's special back to school issue 
of the puzzle page. No talking at the 
back there. Pay attention 

1. THAT'LL TEACH YOU 

Back in Falkovia (hurray!), the cruel 
Duke Bootylace was engaged in tax col- 
lection again — needed to finance his 
shark pools, snake pits and his other 
hobbies. Those who couldn't or 
wouldn't pay were summoned to the 
castle, where a terrible punishment 
awaited them. 

This time though the crowd was 
enormous and the Duke was at a loss as 
to how to dispose of them all. Perhaps 
Tell, his trusty adviser could help. "Tell 
Tell to come here." he bellowed, and 
the call was repeated like an echo down 
the long dark corridors of the castle. Tell 
raced to answer the summons — in 
Falkovia no one is indispensible. 

"Tell me, Tell, how do I clear the 
backlog of prisoners?" Tell thought, 
and finally came up with an ingenious 
solution — which the Duke couldn't 
wait to try out. 

There were now 1247 prisoners out- 
side, thronging the courtyard. The 
latest arrival was called in, and taken to 
the specially prepared dungeon. Before 
the quaking tax avoider were 8 doors, 
maked A-H. 

"Pay close attention, dog." growled 
the Duke. "You are the 1 247th person 




to offend me today. Yet my mercy 
knows no bounds. Count these doors in 
order — A is one, B is two, so H will 
be...?" 

"8?" ventured the prisoner. 

"Exactly!" howled the Duke. "And 
if you carry on counting back then G will 
be 9, F,1 and back to A which will be 
15. Yes?" 

"Err, yes." 

"And reversing again, B will be 16 
and so on. Now if you carry on counting 
to 1247 and open that door, you can 
walk out a free man. Inside the other 7 , 
by the way, lurks a lingering death. So 
start counting." The Duke left, turning 
only to say" By the way, you have one 
minute." 

Now about here we usually say the 
bloke worked it all and got away. Well 
this one panicked, opened a door at ran- 
dom and met a horrible and slow end. If 
it had been you, would you have fared 
better? 



A° 



B 



LID 



F° 



1 



H 



2. GUEST SPOT 

Two contributions this time from Neil 
Fairclough of Wigan; 

"The rungs on a ladder hung from 
the side of a ship are one foot apart. 
Three hours before high tide the bottom 
two rungs are under water. The tide 
rises 16" per hour. How many rungs 
are under water at high tide?" 

"Every morning on his way to work a 
man gets the elevator from the 14th 
floor of his apartment block to the base- 
ment garage. When he gets home he 
takes the elevator to the 7th floor and 



walks up to his flat. Why does he do 
this, and what is his job?" 

And, from R.J. Marratt of 
Wolverhampton; 

Can you find a number % less than 
its square? 

Can you find a number V* more than 
its square? 

Our thanks again for being able to sit 
this one out. More prizes are racing 
from the puzzle page to the deserving 
few. It's not too late to join this most 
exclusive of clubs — the GOLL Club — 
Guest of Lou and Les. 




28 



► A>73 



MAY WICO BE WITH YOU 




When you're up against all the evil in the universe, you 
need the finest joystick. Weak, sticky slow controls 
can only lead you to your doom. 

You need a Wico.® The controls in more than 500 
modem arcade games are actually made by Wico.® They set the 
industry standard for durability and performance. And t he sa me 
arcade quality goes into the Wico® you take home. 

Wico® joysticks work directly with the 
Commodore 64,™ Vic 20,™ all Atari® Home 
Computers and Atari® Video Games. 

Add an interface, and you can connect into 
a Sinclair Spectrum or Apple II® and He.® If you 
have a new MSX computer there's the just 
released MSX Grip Handle for you. 

What do you get? A man-sized handle 
on a virtually unbreakable shaft. Tough, 
ultra-sensitive Wico® switchgear. A heavy- 
weight base. A year's guarantee. And more shee 



dodging, chasing and blasting power than ever before. 

The Wico® range includes the famous Red Ball,™ straight 
out of the arcades. The Three Way Deluxe with interchangeable 
handles. The light but rugged Boss. And check out the state-of- 
the-art Trackball: many owners use it for serious programming, 
where it gives them effortless cursor control. 

Ask your dealer to let you handle a Wico.® Quality 
(you'll find) costs money 

But if you want to have less trouble fighting your 
controls, and more power for fighting the 
) forces of darkness . . . only Wico® is worthy 
of your hand. 



m 




WICO 

THE FINEST HAND CONTROLS 
IN THE KNOWN UNIVERSE 



CGL HOUSE, GOLDINGS HILL, LOUGHTON, ESSEX IG10 2RR. 01-508 5600. LOOK FOR THE WICO NAME IN ALL GOOD SHOPS AND CATALOGUES. 




The daisy JL wheel, dot matrix and colour printers 





3cassette unit 




For program storage and 



monitor. 

Gives really superb reproduction and clarity. 




retrieval. For faster storage 



joysti 

9 They j/put the contra 



a vast range of soft 

There's something for everyone and for all interests... ^Ahouqht-provokinq, amusina entertaininc 




home, 

leisure and practical interests... 



thought-provoking, amusing 
£5i 





edu 

pre-school and beyonc 

a 64k 

Plus excellent sprite graphics am 



About the only thing the Commodore 64 doesn't have 



Plots graphs, constructs bar and Jl pie charts. Prints in 4 colours. ' 




single disk drive 

I of programs. K*s m Uses a 5W diskette, and has a very large 170K memorv 



3nd retrieval of programs 




ckn^i addle sj| 

]f games directly into your hands... they m. also improve both speed and accuracy. I 



*--£». 



ware 

challenging, and exciting. 



FUTURE SI 

FINANCE m 



improve both speed and accuracy. 

(business, 

To cover the essential office and business needs... 



cationalpfilgames) 

ireated with the help and advice of specialists. __^H W^From shoot em up to strategy. 



memory 

imazing music synthesis capabilities. J 



THE COMMODORE 64 COSTS JUST £229 (OR LESS). 

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION PLEASE TICK ONE OR MORE, OF THE BOXES 

AND SEND TO: COMMODORE INFORMATION CENTRE, 1 HUNTERS ROAD, 

WELDON, CORBY, NORTHAMPTON NN17 1QX. TEL: CORBY (0536) 205252. 




s any serious competition. 



COMMODORE 64 □ MONITOR □ 

PRINTERS, PRINTER PLOTTER □ DISK DRIVE □ 

NAME 

ADDRESS 



CASSETTE UNIT □ 
SOFTWARE □ 




64GCQ108 4 

ft commodore 



timing: these gai 



■;,*."' 



4ftvb 




Vr : J WSr 


tfi^ 





■ ■■-•,_•,' ;.., , 



~v 



■t ^ -, «1 

-4 ~t -4 

■4 -4 ■ , 
| -v « , , 

' "' / 

' ■■/ * f, 




lies show no mercy 



Acornsoft have now unleashed eight more mer- 
ciless games onto unsuspecting BBC micro owners. 

Ranging from 'Gateway to KarosJ where putting 
a foot wrong could mean instant death. To the relentless 
antics of Drogna which could have you dying with 
laughter. 

Gateway to Karos. 

An adventure game in which you'll need all 
your patience and ingenuity just to stay alive. Your 
objective is to find the Talisman of Khoronz but, 
whichever path you choose, you'll be beset by treachery. 
Serpents lie in wait and magicafphenomenona are in 
abundance. Should you find the Talisman, you've still 
to find your way back. 

Kin g dom of Hamil. 
As the rightful heir to the Kingdom of Hamil, 
you are in the unusual position of having to prove 
your claim to the throne. Evil people are trying to 
prevent you accomplishing your task by any means. 
An adventure game fraught with many dangers, 
puzzles and problems. 

Tetrapod. 
You're in an arena littered with dormant lizards, 
killer bees and other hostile creatures with whom 
you'll have to do battle to survive. But beware of your 
own laser bullets, as they bounce off the arena walls. 

Dro gna. 
A game for two people - preferably with devious 
minds. There are two vaults containing diamonds and 
your job is to collect and transfer them to your home 
base. While your opponent is out collecting you could 
sneak in and steal his loot . . . but keep an eye out for 
him doing the same to you. 

Crazy Tracer. 
An arcade style game where you're in charge of 
a paint roller. Guide your roller around a maze of 
rectangles while evading monsters who are committed 
to destroying it. Gain extra rollers and bonus points 
by painting different objects. But you'll have to avoid 
running out of paint. 

Volcano. 
Mount Croha has erupted after 150 years of 
silence. And your mission as an Emergency Rescue 
Helicopter Pilot is to save sightseers stranded on the 
slopes. Time is of the essence as the lava approaches 
the sightseers. But you'll have to take time to evade - 
or shoot - the boulders being hurled from the volcano. 



Carousel. 
A re-creation of the fairground shooting gallery 
- with a difference. Shoot down all the ducks, owls 
and rabbits before you run out of ammunition. 
Watch out for the low-flying ducks. If you fail to shoot 
these, they'll steal your bullets and reduce your 
chances of success. 

Meteor Mission. 



On an alien planet are six stranded astronauts. 
Launch your capsule from the Mothership and by 
avoiding - or shooting - meteors and alien craft, pick 
up the astronauts one at a time and return them to 
the Mothership. 

All games - with the exception of Gateway to 
Karos which is currently only available on cassette - 
can be bought direct in either cassette or disc form. 
You will find all these programs at your local Acorn 
stockist. To find out where they are simply call 
01-200 0200. Credit card holders, phone 01-200 0200, 
anytime. Or 0933 79300, during office hours. 

Alternatively, you can order the games by 
sending off the coupon below to : Acornsoft, c/o Vector 
Marketing, Denington Estate, Wellingborough, 
Northants NN8 2RL. Please allow 28 days for delivery. 



To: Acornsoft, c/o Vector Marketing, Denington Estate, 
Wellingborough, Northants NN8 2RL. 
Please send me the following software games: 



PROGRAM 
Gateway to Karos 




QUANTITY 


DISC/CASSETTE 


Kingdom of Hamil 






Tetrapod 






Drogna 






Crazy Tracer 






Volcano 






Carousel 






Meteor Mission 








TOTAL 







Price Cassette: £9.95; Disc: £11.50 

I enclose PO/Cheque payable to Acornsoft Ltd. Or charge my 

credit charge. 

Card Number: 

Barclaycard/ Access (Delete) 

Name 

Address 



.Postcode . 



Signature 



GC10 



Registered No. 1524763 



VAT No. 215 8123 85 



4C0RNSdFT 



'A v ,c - . 




tt ' * t 

**" I* 

y % v... 

.<.•••'£'"'•'■• ..<■ •-• 



W"**.. 



\ .. '•-*. 



;v. / 









s. 





1 REM RUIN by Michael Kempster 

10 GOSUB 30000: REM REDEFINE 

20 GOSUB 20000: REM TITLE SCREENS 

25 REM SET UP IMPORTANT VARIABLES 

30 LI=3:SK=1: AS=0.5:SC=0 

40 X=10: Y=10: TI=100: TR1=0: TR2=0: TR3=0 

45 POSITION 0,0:PRINT #6; CHR* < 125) : REM DRAW SCREEN 

50 COLOR 132: PLOT .7,19: DRAWTO 0,19:DRAWTO 0,0:DRAWTO 19 

,0:DRAWTO 19,19:DRAWT0 12,19:C0L0R 166:PL0T 8,19 

55 COLOR 165: PLOT 11, 19: COLOR 4 

60 IF SK<3 THEN PLOT 2,5:DRAWT0 2,7:DRAWT0 4,7:PL0T 17, 

5:DRAWT0 17,7:DRAWT0 15,7:PL0T 4,12:DRAWT0 2,12:DRAWT0 

2,14 

IF SK<3 THEN PLOT 15,12:DRAWT0 17,12:DRAWTO 17,14 



61 
70 
80 



IF SK<6 THEN PLOT 7,8:DRAWT0 7,11 
IF SKX9 THEN PLOT 12,8:DRAWT0 12,11 



130 IF 
140 IF 
150 
153 







Wki 



:.«.»"'. 



i.*?. 



met 



;*3VaJ 



•jf.-.'M 



90 COLOR 132:PL0T 5,4:DRAWT0 14,4:PL0T 5,15:DRAWT0 14,1 
5 

95 GOSUB 10000 

100 COLOR 7:PL0T X,Y:COLOR 40:PLOT AH.AV 
105 POSITION 6,21:? #6; "TIME: " ; INT (TI ) ; " » 
107 POSITION 0,23:? #6; "SCORE: "; SC: POSITION 14,23:? #6; 
"men: ";LI 

110 S=STICK(0) : IF TK1 THEN 3000 
120 IF S=14 THEN GOSUB 990:Y=Y-1 
S=13 THEN GOSUB 990:Y=Y+1 
8=11 THEN GOSUB 990:X=X-1 

IF S=7 THEN GOSUB 990: X = X + 1 

IF TI>90 THEN FOR N=l TO 15: NEXT N:GOTO 200 
155 COLOR 32: PLOT AH , AV 

160 IF AH<X THEN LOCATE AH+AS , AV,P: IF P=32 OR P=7 THEN 
AH=AH+AS:GOTO 180 

170 IF AH>X THEN LOCATE AH-AS , AV , P: IF P=32 OR P=7 THEN 
AH=AH-AS 

180 IF AV<Y THEN LOCATE AH, AV+AS, P: IF P=32 OR P=7 THEN 
AV=AV+AS:GOTO 200 

190 IF AV>Y THEN LOCATE AH, AV-AS,P: IF P=32 OR P=7 THEN 
AV=AV-AS 

195 IF X=AH AND Y=AV THEN GOTO 3000 

200 SETCOLOR 2,X,15:S0UND 1 , TI , 10, 15: SOUND 0,0,0,0:SOUN 
D 1,0,0,0 

205 LOCATE AH,AV,P:IF P=7 THEN GOTO 3000 
210 TI=TI-0. 5: SETCOLOR 2,X,15 

220 IF Y=19 AND TR1=1 AND TR2=1 AND TR3=1 THEN GOTO 200 


225 IF Y=19 THEN 3000 
230 LOCATE X,Y,P:IF P=32 THEN 100 
240 IF P=161 OR P=162 OR P=163 THEN 1000 
250 IF P=132 OR P=4 THEN 3000 
270 GOTO 100 

990 COLOR 32: PLOT X,Y: SOUND 1 , 91 , 10 , 10: RETURN 
1000 REM TREASURES 

1010 IF P=161 THEN TR1=1:SC=SC+10*SK 
1020 IF P=162 THEN TR2=1 : SC=SC+10*INT <RND (0) *10) 
1030 IF P=163 THEN TR3=1 : SC=SC+10*SK 
1040 RESTORE 1500 

1050 FOR NOTES=l TO 6:READ N,D:SOUND , N, 10 , 15: FOR DUR= 
1 TO D:NEXT DUR:NEXT NOTES 
1060 GOTO 100 

1500 DATA 81,50,91,50,68,50,60,25,45,25,53,100 
2000 ? #6; CHR* (125) 
2005 SOUND 0,0, 0,0: SOUND 1,0,0,0 
2010 POSITION 5,2:? #6; "tresure is" 
2020 POSITION 0,10 

2030 ? #6;"*** *** * * * * ** * ******** *** 
********** ***** **** *** *** * * ** 

2040 POSITION 2,19:? #6;" PREPARE FOR RUIN" 

2050 SK=SK+l:AS=AS+0. 1: IF ASM THEN AS=1 

2055 TUNE=1 

2060 FOR N=l TO 500: NEXT N 

2070 RESTORE 2500 

2080 READ N: IF N=-l THEN SOUND 0,0,0,0: GOTO 40 

2090 SOUND 0,N,10,10:FOR D=l TO 200:NEXT D:GOTO 2080 

2500 DATA 81,72,91,144,123,-1,-1 

3000 REM DEAD OR ALIVE 

3010 TUNE=1 

3020 REM DEAD 

3030 COLOR 169:PL0T X,Y:SOUND ,255 , 10 , 15: FOR N=l TO 10 

0:NEXT N 

3040 COLOR 170:PLOT X,Y:SOUND ,250, 10 , 15: FOR N=l TO 10 

0:NEXT N 

3050 COLOR 171:PL0T X,Y:SDUND , 245 , 10, 15: FOR N=l TO 10 

0:NEXT N 

3060 COLOR 172:PL0T X,Y:SOUND , 200 , B , 10: FOR N=l TO 75: 

NEXT N 

3070 COLOR 173:PL0T X,Y:SOUND 0, 180 , 8 , 6: FOR N=l TO 75:N 

EXT N:SOUND 0,0,0,0 

3080 LI=LI-1:IF LK1 THEN GOTO- 3500 

3090 FOR N=l TO 400: NEXT N: ? #6; CHR* < 125) : GOTO 40 

3500 ? #6; CHR* (125) 

3510 POSITION 2,10:? #6; "BAD LUCK youre" : POSITION 8,12: 

? #6; "dead" 

3520 FOR N=l TO 400: NEXT N:? #6;CHR*(\25) 

3530 GOTO 20 




••■;-•! 






i v^'A 






^ 
.«*>• 






• i ' ». « S! 

•v-'^v •-.>. ..'.v.-. \ 

■. *■ .-» <• v *'»..r 



|^*V-. 






A.- 



. . - j> 




i^ 
<&>&% 

x <^ 



JYou are Fred, the intrepid explorer, and 
lyou love delving into old ruins in search 
|of valuable items. 

One day when Fred was strolling he 
Icame across a very old house, "Oh 
[great!", he thought. "I can do some ex- 
ploring. After going into the house he 
Ifound rooms and rooms of valuable 
[treasures. But! unfortunately an old 
Ighost of the long dead owner haunted 
Ithe house. If the ghost ever catches 
JFred he will explode and die. In a room 
(there are walls, which the ghost cannot 
Igo through. Through-out the game 
jthese walls will disappear. Also the 
|ruins will collapse if Fred stays too long 
Jin a room. The ghost will lie dormant forj 
la few seconds, so Fred has a little time 
Ito collect as many of the three treasures 
Ihe must get out of the room, through a 
Idoor at the bottom of the room. 

The score, amount of lives, and time 
|left is shown at the bottom of 
the screen, Good luck! 



•■>. ••-fV'.-. ?<i 



mkW^m w0£Mm vm :: \\m 













frf"•'•^v7•:^. , 
■-■•• .si* 1 



t » t.S3 



t .!• 









.r 



;«.. »>. 




10000 GOSUB 15000:CDLOR 161.-PL0T AH,AV 
10010 GOSUB 15000:COLOR 162:PL0T AH,AV 
10020 GOSUB 15000:COLOR 163:PL0T AH,AV 

10030 GOSUB 15000:COLOR 40:PLOT AH,AV:COLOR 7:PL0T X,Y 
10035 IF TUNE=1 THEN FOR N=l TO 250: NEXT Ni RETURN 
10040 RESTORE 13000 

10050 READ N,D:IF N=-l THEN SOUND 0, 0,0 , 0: RETURN 
10060 SOUND 0,N,10, 15:FOR DUR=0 TO DrNEXT DURsGOTO 1005 


13000 DATA 31,50,28,50,35,50,42,100,37,50,47,50,0,50,64 
, 50 , 57 , 50 , 72 , 50 , 85 , 1 00 , 76 , 50 , 96 , 50 , , 50 , 128 , 50 
13010 DATA 114,50,144,50,173,100,153,50,173,50,182,50,1 
93,50,0,125,47,75,0,25,-1 ,-1 
15000 REM PLACE CHARACTERS 

15010 AH=INT(RND(0)*17>+1:AV=INT(RND(0)*17>+1:LOCATE AH 
,AV,P:IF AV=10 THEN 15010 
15015 IF P=32 THEN RETURN 
15020 GOTO 15010 

20000 SETCOLOR 0,3, 10: SETCOLOR 1 . . 12: SETCOLOR 2.15.15: Y 
SETCOLOR 3,6,10 
20010 POSITION 0,1 

20020 ? #6;"*** * * *** * * ***"; 
#6; "* * * * * ** * * "; 
#6; "*** * * 9 * ** **$"; 
#6; ! '** * * * * * *"; 
#6;"* * *** *** * * ***"; 
20070 POSITION 9,9:? #6; "by" : POSITION 2,11:? #6; "MICHAE 
L KEMPSTER" 

20080 POSITION 4, IB:? #6; "press START" 
20090 IF PEEK (53279)06 THEN 20090 

20100 FOR Y=8 TO 23: COLOR 32:PL0T 0,Y:DRAWTO 19,Y:NEXT 
Y 

20105 IF SO=HI THEN HI=SC 
20110 POSITION 4,7:? #6;"/ potion" 
20120 POSITION 4,9:? #6!"" key" 
20130 POSITION 4,11:? #6; "# crystal" 

" ' explorer" 

'( ghost" 

•SCORE: ";SC 

'hiscore: ";HI 

'PRESS start TO play" 



20030 ? 
20040 
20050 ? 
20060 



20140 POSITION 4,13:? #6; 

20150 POSITION 4,15:? #6; 

20160 POSITION 7,17:? #6; 

20170 POSITION 6,19n? #6j 

20180 POSITION 1,22:? #6; 

20190 IF PEEK (53279)06 THEN 20190 

20195 TUNE=0 

20200 RETURN 

30000 DIM M*(32> ,P(1) : GRAPHICS 1+16 

30010 RESTORE 30100 

30020 FOR 1 = 1 TO 32: READ A: M* ( I ) =CHR* ( A) : NEXT I 

30030 P=PEEK(106)-4:P=P-4:P(1)=P 

30040 P=P(1)*256:A=USR(ADR(M*> , 57344, P) 

30050 FOR I=B TO 1 1 1 : READ A: POKE P ( 1 ) *256+I , A: NEXT I 

30055 POKE 756,P(1) 

30060 RETURN 

30100 DATA 104,104,133,204,104,133,203,104,133,206,104, 

1 33 , 205 , 1 62 , 4 , 1 60 , , 1 77 , 203 , 1 45 , 205 , 1 36 , 208 , 249 , 230 , 204 

30110 DATA 230,206,202,208,240,96 

30120 DATA 102,36,66,149,129,169,66,60 

30130 DATA 0,224,160,191,170,168,224,0 

30140 DATA 64, 228, 78, 4, 64, 228, 7B, 4 

30150 DATA 36,102,195,24,24,195,102,36 

30160 DATA 4,4,7,2,2,7,4,4 

30170 DATA 32,32,224,64,64,224,32,32 

30180 DATA 90,90,66,60,24,60,36,102 

30190 DATA 124,254,182,146,254,254,170,170 

30200 DATA 0,90,90,60,24,60,102,0 

30210 DATA 0,0,24,60,24,60,0,0 

30220 DATA 0,0,0,24,24,0,0,0 

30230 DATA 0,0,20,0,0,20,0,0 

30240 DATA 0,66,0,0,0,0,66,0 





HIGH STREET 



SBHnnBHHHi 





i: Ever thougraf; that; you w'.e.re a budding 
■ penis .Uiltey?'C>f hadaspirations of eating 
mGre;/Shre.dded Wheats than Ian 
' : ,B6 : tham'?',ifs6 then this is.' the game for 
^.ypifr,:'' " .';.■•'.". ■■•••'.■■ 

^%.^y|l^fcttcket:-':game for the Com- 

:. i^pdar&'€'4 js not a graphical action 

;'^0arne-'but an accurate simulation. of a 

.test .rriaich" between two . opposing 

•..teams. Fu.y. statistics are kept of the 

vmajclr.ahd after a few games you begin 

: ..to'- understand what the cricket com- 

; mehtators are actually talking about! 

■\ .The .player is. allowed to enter their 

; ;pWri;-te.am;or use the computer selec- 

. tioh. The computer will field a rest of 

the world team of current and past 

'■ stars. The two main types of match can 

be selected i.e'. a full four innings game 

or a limited over match. 

Full statistics are kept of the match 
and may be displayed at any time. At 
the end of each oyer the player changes 
ends and bowlers. The player is asked 
to identify which are bowlers and they 
may. only bowl eight overs before 
change. Batting and Bowling are en- 
tered by the use of a random number 
running until a key is pressed. When Bat- 
ting the score is then given (0/1 /1 /3/4 
or 6) or 'Hows That' is displayed and 
the computer will give it's judgement. 
When bowling the player hits a key to 
stop. a djspJay of 'How Outs' including 
Not Out which is actioned accordingly. 
A scoreboard is displayed to the player 
at all times and instructions are included 
in the program. 

Variables Used 



B5 
B6 
B7 

B8 



C$ 
C1$ 



Second Bowler number 
Bowler taking Batsmans 
wicket 

Bowlerat end one 
Bowler at- end two 
Number of overs '.... ■ 
bow led, by bowler B5 
Number of overs" 
bowled by bowler B6 

Command Input 
Command Input 



E$ Work 

E1 % Extras 

E2%(2,1 1 ) Bowlers Extras 



A$ . 

B' 
81 

B1 %(2 



11 



Computer Team Name 

Bowler Bowling 
First Bowler number 
Batsman — Number of 
balls faced 



F1 %(2 


,11) 


Fall of wicket scores 


G 




How out code 


H1 $ (2 


11) 


Batsman — How out 
code 


I 
l$ 




Number of innings 
Innings literal 


L1% 

L2% 




Last man out score 
Last wicket score 


N$ 




Human Team Name 




0% 
01%(2 


,1 D 


Number of overs 

Overs played 

Overs bowled by bowler 


P1$(2, 
P1$(2, 
P3 

P4 
P5 


11) 
11) 


Player Names 
Player Names 
First Batsman No. 
Second Batsman No. 
Work 



■ 



xsa*&-- KU w ^... '"'V 





Individual wickets taken 
Wickets Taken 

Work ' : ':"'■■ '-■ 

Work 

Balls played in over 
Work 
Work 
Work 

No of wickets 
taken/Work 
nnings defeat flag. 

Work 

Subscript . • 

Subscript 

Subscript ••".'• 

Subscript 

Bowlers average 

Bowlers average 



**&stsz>r- &&&& 




c 

100 REM ************************** f -3 

110 REM ** AUTHOR LEN KEICHLEV ** 

120 REM ** WRITTEN 4/4/81 **■ 

130 REM ************************** 

1 35 P0KE53286 -15: P0KE5328 1 , 1 5 •■ PR I NT " H" 

140 PRINT'TMBBMSKKW" 

150 PRINT" <■"■'■—■—■—■—■—■-< 

160 PRINT"WM»»»»HM»»»IS CRICKET " 

170 PRINT"»ilH»»>»Mtl " 

180 PR I NT "MS" 

220 FOR t=0TO5000 : NEXT 

240 DATAJ . HOBES , W . EUR I CH , D . COMPTON 

250 DflTHG . SOBERS , F . ENG I NEER ., M . G . GRACE 

260 DATAD. BRAHMAN, J. LAKER, F. TRUEMAH 

270 DATAW.HALL,E.STflTHAM 

280 Ii I MP 1 * < 2 , 1 1 ) , 1 ■/. ( 2 ,11) 

290 D I V\U 1 V. i 2 , 1 1 ) , R 1 V. C 2 , 1 1 ) 

300 DIHB1X(2, ll),B3!2<2,li) 

310 dimhi*<2,ii),six<2, in 

320 D I MF 1 V. < 2 , 1 1 > , E2X ( 2 , 1 1 ) 

330 PR I NT "3" 

340 PRINT"THI8, THE CBM VERSION OF CRICKET USES" 

350 PR I NT "A RANDOM NUMBER GENERATOR TO CALCULATE" 

360 PR I NT "THE RUNS SCORED." 

370 PRINT" YOU HAVE THE CHOICE OF PLAVIHG AGAINST" 

330 PR I NT "A REST OF THE WORLD XI (PAST) OR OF" 

390 PR I NT "ENTERING VOUR FAVORITE TEAM." 

400 PRINT"SWHEN SPLAY <Y/H)S IS DISPLAYED THE BOWLER" 

410 PRINT" IS ABOUT TO START HIS RUN UP. AFTER THE" 

420 PRINT" "i" KEY HAS BEEN HIT, TO STRIKE THE " 

430 PR I NT "BALL HIT THE "'H' KEY." 

440 PRINT"WTHE REST OF THE RULES ARE THE SAME AS" 

450 PR I NT" FOR NORMAL CRICKET. AT THE BEG INNING OF" 

460 PR I NT "EACH OVER, THE PLAYER (WHEN FIELDING)" 

470 PR I NT "WILL BE ASKED IF HE WISHES TO CHANGE" 

480 PRINT"THE BOWLER. ALL THE USUAL STATISTICS" 

490 PRINT "WILL BE KEPT AND CAN BE REQUESTED BY" 

500 PRINT"HITTING THE '8' KEY WHEN THE PLAY" 

510 PR I NT "REQUEST IS MADE. THE PET WILL CHANGE TO" 

520 PRINT"FIELDIHG MODE AT END OF THE INNINGS." 

530 GOSUB5390 

540 PR I NT" 31 F YOU WISH TO DECLARE HIT THE 'D'" KEY" 

550 PRIHT"WHEN THE PLAY REQUEST IS MADE." 

560 PRINT"MM!M««»MMMMMMl»M300D LUCK" 

570 GOSUE5390 

530 A$="REST OF THE WORLD XI" 

590 I*=" 1ST INN" 

600 REM - START OF GAME 

610 PR I NT "ZJ" 

620 PRINT"BO YOU WISH TO ENTER VOUR OWN" 

630 PR I NT "OPPOSING TEAM CY/M)" 

640 GETC$ : IFC*=" "THEH640 

650 IFC*="V"THEN710 

660 I FC*0 " N " THEH60O 

670 FOR21=1T011 

680 READP1*(2,Z1) 

690 NEXTZ1 

700 GOTO780 

710 PRINT":: 11 

720 PR I NT "ENTER VOUR OPPOSING TEAMWS" 

730 F0RZ1=1T011 

740 PRINTZ1". ".: 

750 INPUTP1*<2,21) 

760 HEXTZ1 

770 IHPUT":«BITEAM NAME? ";fi* 

780 PRINT' 1 :: 11 

790 PRINT"DO YOU WISH TO EAT FIRST (V/H)" 

800 QETC* : IFC*=" "THEN800 

8 1 I FC*= " Y " THENZ2= 1 : GOTOS40 

820 IFC*="N"THENZ2=2 : G0T0848 

830 6OTO780 

840 PRINT"3«WWENTER YOUR TEAMS NAME'-".: 

850 INPUTN* 

860 N*=N*+" XI" 

870 PRIHT":*WDO YOU REQUIRE LIMITED OVER GAME CY/N!'" 

830 QETC* : I FC*= " " THEN880 

890 IFC*="Y"THEN970 

900 IFC*O"N"THEN370 

910 PRINT"*KHOW MANY INNINGS (1/2)" 

920 QETC* : IFC*=" "THEN928 

930 I=VALCC*> 

940 IFO2ORIOTHEN910 

950 0=0 

960 GOTO 1008 

970 INPUT "SBPHOU MANY OVERS < 1 -60 ) " i 

980 I FO>60ORO< 1 THEN970 

990 I =0 

1000 PR I NT "3" 

1010 PR I NT "ENTER VOUR TEAMMM" 

1028 F0RZ1=1T011 

1030 PRINTZ1". ".: 

1040 INPUT" III";P1*(1,Z1) 

1850 NEXTZ1 

1060 P3=l : P4=2 : R=l : B5=9 : B6=10 : B=l : P5=2 : S2=0 ' X2=8 

1078 IFZ2=1THEN1110 

1080 PR I NT 'TENTER FIRST TWO BOWLERS (B1,B2)" 



40 



1090 

1 1 00 
1110 
1120 

1130 
1140 
1150 
1160 
1178 
1180 
1190 

1 200 

1210 
1220 
1230 
1240 
1250 
1260 
1270 
1280 
1290 
1 300 
1310 
1 320 
1330 
1340 
1350 
1360 
1370 
1338 
1390 
1480 
1410 
1420 
1438 
1440 
1458 
1460 
1470 
1480 
1490 

1 500 

1510 
1520 
1530 
1540 
1550 
1560 
1570 
1580 
1590 

1600 

1610 
1620 
1630 
1648 
1650 
1660 
1670 
1680 



C0ORB6> 11 THEN 1070 



INPUTB5,E6 

IFE5O30RB5M10RB6 

IFX2=6THEH2980 

E*="N" : IFT2X=0ORT3::=0THEH1190 

IFX4-O3THEH1190 

IFZ2-1THEN1170 

IFTl?i+T2fi>T3KTHEN3520 

GOTO 1190 

ifti;-;+T3K>t2-;then3520 

GOTO1190 
IFO=0THEN1250 
IFX4-O1THEH1250 
IFZ2-1THEH1240 

ifti;-:>t3;-;then3520 

GOTO 1250 
IFT1»T2KTHEN3520 

""l THEN 1290 

BATTING 



- BATTING 



"BLS SCR" 



"It 



'I* 



IF 

PRIHT"D"A*" 
GOTO 1300 
PRINT'T5"N.*" 

PR I NT "I 1" 

PRINT "I I" 

PR I NT "I I" 

PRINTTABC31 

PRINT" 

IFP3O0THENPRIHT" "; 

PRINTP3;LEFT*<P1*<22,P3),25) 

T=0 

IFB1^(:Z2,P3X10THENT=2:GOTO1400 

IFB1XCZ2, P3X190THENT=1 : GOTO1400 

PRINT "n"TflB(30+T)BlJi(Z2,P3) 

T=0 

IFS1K<22,P3X10THEHT=2:GOTO1440 

IFS15KZ2, P3X100THEHT=1 ■ G0T01440 

PRINT" TTflB<34+T)SlKC22, P3) 

PR I NT'"!" TAB (30)" I "TAB (34)" I" 

PR I NT " 

IFP4<10THENPRINT" " .: 

PRINTP4; LEFT*<P1*<22, P4) , 25) ■ 

T=0 

I FE 1 ■; < 22 , P4) < 1 0THENT=2 : GOTO 1 520 

IFB1JKZ2, P4X10@THENT=1 : GOTO1520 

PR I NT " T'TABC 30+T) B 1 V. C 22, P4 ) 

T=@ 

IFS1XH22, P4X10THENT=2 : G0T01560 

I FS 1 V. i Z2 , P4 ) C 1 00THEHT== 1 : GOTO 1 560 

PR I NT " T TAB C 34+T >S1K (22, P4) 



:0; 



I "TAB (34)" I" 



PRINT"TTflB<: 

PRINT" 1 — i J L " 

PR I NT "SCORE "TAB (20)" I "Ti:;TABC26:' " ISSCORES:-"" 

PR I NT "MI CKETS " TAB (20 ) " I " U2JSTflB ( 26 > " I " LEFT* i A* , 1 ) 

PR I NT "LAST MAN "TAB i 20 ) " I "LI f.TAB (26 ) " I " T2r-J 

PR I NT "LAST WICKET "TAB (20)" I "L2KTREC26) " I "LEFT* 'CN*, 10) 

PR I NT "EXTRAS "TAB (28)" I "E1-;TAB(26> " l"T38 

PRINT"OVERS"TRB(20)" I "0';TAB(26) " I" 

PRINT"BRLLS IN OVER"TAB(20) " I "X2TAB(26:> " I " 

PRINT" ' ' " 

IF22=1THEN23=2 
IFZ2=2THENZ3=1 




1690 
1700 
1710 
1720 
1730 
1740 
1750 
1760 
1770 
1780 
1798 
1800 
1810 
1820 
1830 
1840 
1850 
1 860 
1870 
1830 
1890 
1900 
1910 
1929 
1930 
1940 
1950 
1 960 
1970 
1980 
1990 

2000 

20 1 
2020 
2030 
2040 
2050 
2060 
2070 
2080 
2090 
21Q0 
2110 
2120 
2130 
2140 
2150 
2160 
2170 
2138 
2190 
2200 
2210 
2220 
2230 
2240 
2250 
226S 
2270 
30 




I FB5<I0THENU1$=" BOWLERS " :G0T01710 

U1*="B0WLERS " 

PRIHTU1*B5". "TflEa4::'LEFT*CPlJ'::Z3,E5:',22) 

IFB6< 1 0THEHIJ 1'$=" " : GOTO 1 740 

Ul*=" 

PR I HTU 1 SB6 " . "TAB < 1 4 ) LEFT* < Pl*< 23 , B6 ) , 22 > 

PRIHTTRB(30;'"I I" 

PRINTTRB(30V'| |" 

PRIHTTfiB<30>"l J" 

IFG=9999THEHRETURH 

IFR=2THEHP0KE1344,42 

IFB=1THENP0KE1752,42 

IFB=2THENP0KE1792..42 

IFR=1THEHP0KE1264,42 

PRINT "3" 

PRINT"W»ISPLFlV <V/H)H" 

OETC* : I FC*= " " THEN 1 850 

IFC*="S"THEN4310 

IFC*="D"THEH3520 

IFC*O"Y"THEN1830 

IFZ2=2THEN3360 

X=INT(RHB<0>*10> 

IFX=8THEHX=0 

IFX=9THENX=1 

IFXO7THEH1960 

POKE 11 05, 8 

GOTO2000 

IFXO5THEN1990 

POKE1105,5 

GOTO2000 

POKE 1 105, 43+X 

OETC* 

IFC$=""THEH1900 

IFX=5THEN2240 

IFX=7THEH2390 

PRINT"»M»BCORE - "X 

FORQ=1TO1000 : HEXTQ 

IFR=lTHEHSl";(22,P3)=Si;^:22,P3)+X:Bl^(Z2,P3)==Bi;«Z2,P3:) + l 

IFR=2THENS1X<Z2, P4>=SUi<:Z2, P4)+X : B1/£<Z2< P4i-liVi<.Z2, P4J.+1 

I FX=2ORX=4ORX=6ORX=0THEH2 1 30 

IFE*="V"THEN2130 

IFR=1THENQ=2 

IFR=2THENQ=1 

R=Q 

TV/.=TlX+y. 

IFZ2=1THEH2130 

IFX4O3THEH2200 

I FT2J!+T 1 JOT3XTHEN3520 

GOTO2200 

ifx4o3then2280 

ift3;:+ti;:>t2-;then3520 

IFEt="V"THEN1110 

IFB=lTHEHRlJiCZ3..E5>=RlK(23<E5>+X 

IFB=2THEHR1M':Z3,B6:)=R1:;(;Z3..B6)+X 

GOTO1110 

REM - EXTRAS 

X3=RNB<8> 

IFX3<0. 1THEH230S 

IFX3<0. 2flHBX3>0. 1THEN2370 

X=@ 




# 







& 
m 



0/ 2900 , 2930- 2960, 





2290 G0TO2O40 
2300 PRIHT":!*»»il:*10 BALL"" 
2310 IFB=1THEHE2/!X23,£5>=E2;-:<Z3,B5 
2320 IFE=2THEHE2/;CZ3,B6)=E2-iCZ3,E6:! + l 
2330 ElJJ«EiX+l:E3X<Z2)=ElK 
2340 X~1 : X2=X2-1 : E*="V" 
2350 FORQ= 1 TO 1 000 i HEXTQ 
2360 GOTO2880 
2370 PR I NT "JWMHMSW I DEB" 
2330 GOTO2310 

2390 REM - HOW'S THAT - COMPUTER 
2400 PRINT"MM*MSHOW'S THAT!"" 
2410 IFZ2=2THEH3470 
2420 FORX5=1TO50 
2430 X=IHT(RHIK0Jifl0> 
2440 POKE 1 895 .. 48+X 
2450 HEXTX5 
2460 IFX=0THEH2420 
2470 UNXGOTO2750 ; 2780 ,281 , 2840 , 
2480 GOTO2390 

2490 PRINT ,, ."iniWHUMtnmimM- "U* 
2500 FORQ= 1 TO 1 000 : NEXTQ 
2510 IFX>7THEN1110 - 
2520 82=82+1 
2530 W2X=W2K+1 
2540 P5=P5+1 

2550 IFB=lTHEHI4i::(Z3,E5::'=Ui;:a3,B5:H-l 
2560 IFB=2THENW1X<Z3»B6)=U1«<Z3»E6>+1 
2570 IFR-2THEH2630 
2580 IFB=1THENB3X<Z2,P3:>=B5 
2590 Bl"i<Z2..P3)'El%<Z£,P3) + l 
2600 H1*<Z2,P3J=U1* 
26 1 I FE=2THEHB3X C 22 , P3 ) =B6 
2620 GOTO2670 

2630 IFB=1THENB3K<Z2, P4)=B5 
2640 BlKCZ2 J P4>=BiK<Z2 J P4Hl 
2650 IFB=2THENB3XCZ2< P4>=B6 
2660 H1*CZ2,P4::'=U1* 
2678 IFS2=10THEH3520 
2688 F1X!:Z2..S2:j=T1v 
2690 L2?i=Tlfi 

2700 IFR=1THENL1K=S1"/.<Z2jP3> 
27 1 I FR=2THENL l X=S 1 V. '-. Z2 , P4 ? 
2720 IFR=1THEHP3=P5 
2730 IFR=2THEHP4=P5 
2740 GOTO1110 
2750 U*=" BOWLED" 
2760 U1*="£/LD" 
2770 GOTO2490 
2780 U*=" CAUGHT" 
2790 U1*="C/HT" 
2800 GOTO2490 
2810 U*=" STUMPED" 
2820 U1$="STMP" 
2830 GOTO2490 
2340 U*="LBW" 
2850 U1$="LBU" 
2860 G0T02498 
2870 U*=" CAUGHT & BOWLED" 
2880 U1*="C&B" 
2890 GOTO2490 
2900 IJ*="HIT UICKET" 
2910 U1*="H/WT" 
2920 G0T0249S 
2930 U*="RUH OUT" 
2940 Ul*="R/OT" 
2950 GOTO 24 90 
2960 U*="NOT OUT" 
2970 GOTO2490 
2980 REM - END OF OVER 
2990 O!-i=0";+l 
3000 X2=0 

3010 IFB=lTHEH01":CZ3 J E5>=Oi;i<Z3,I:5) + l 
3020 IFB=2THEN01^(Z3,E6::'=0i;-:CZ3..B6:) + l 
3030 IFB=1THENG=2 
3040 IFB=2THENQ=1 
050 B=Q 

860 IFR=1THENS=2 
070 IFR=2THEHQ=1 
080 R=Q: IFOK=OTHEH3520 

3090 IFB=2THENB7=E7+1 

3100 IFB=1THENB8=E8+1 

SI 10 IFZ2=2THEN3200 

8120 IFB7<6AHBB8<6THEN1 198 

>'130 IFB7=6THEH3178 

5140 E6=B6+2 : E8=8 
3150 IFE6>11THEHE6=8 
160 GOTO 1190 

3170 E5=E5+2 : E7=0 

3 138 IFB5>11THENB5=9 

3190 GQTQ1190 

3200 PR I NT "30 VOU REQUIRE TO CHANGE BOWLER CV/NJ" 

3210 GETCt : IFC*=" "THEN3210 

3220 IFC*O"V"flNDC*O"N"THEN3380 

3230 IFC*= i "t'"THEH5210 

3240 IFE7C5ANBB8C5THEN1 190 

5250 IFB8=5THEN3310 

S26@ PR I NT "KMBOWLER " B5 ; P 1 * (, Z3 , B5 i 

5270 PRINT"«»M»»MI1UST BE CHANGED - I/P BOWLER" 

3280 IHPUTB5 

3290 IFB5<1ORE5>11THEH3260 

3300 B7=0 : GOTO1190 

33 1 PR I NT " JPMBOWLER " B6 ; PI* < Z3 , B6 > 

3328 PRINT"M«I**M*M"IUST BE CHANGED - I/P BOWLER" 

3330 IHPUTB6 

3340 I FE6 < 1 0RE6> 1 1 THEN33 1 

3350 E8=0: GOTO 1190 

3360 F0RX5=1T015 



CAN 



MS\ 



41 




3379 
338S 
3390 
3400 
3410 
3420 
3430 
3440 
3450 
3460 
3470 
3430 
3490 
3500 
3510 
3520 
3530 
3540 
3550 
3560 
3570 
3530 
3590 
3600 
3610 
3620 

363a 

3640 
3650 
3660 
3670 
3630 
3690 
3700 
3710 
3720 
3730 
3740 
3750 
3760 
3770 
3780 
3790 
3800 
3810 
3820 
3836 
3840 
3850 
3860 
3870 
3830 
3890 
8900 
3910 
3920 
">3930 
3940 
3950 
3960 
3970 
3980 
3990 

4000 
4010 

4020 
4030 
4040 
4050 
4060 
4070 
4080 
4090 

4100 

4110 
4120 
4130 
4140 
4150 
4160 
4170 
4180 
4190 
4200 
4210 
4220 
4230 
4240 
4250 
4260 
4270 
4280 
4290 

4800 

4310 
4320 



42 



X=INT<RNB<0)*10) 

IFXO5THEH3400 

POKE1105..5'G0TO3450 

IFXO7THEN3420 

FOKE1105,8:GOTO 

IFX=8THEHQ=0:X= 

IFX=9THEH0=1:X= 

POKE 1 105, 48+X 

HEXTX5 

QOTO2020 

X=INKRNIK0)*10) 

POKE 1 895, 48+X 

QETC* 

IFC$=""THEH3470 

GGTO2460 

REM - EHH OF INNINGS 

0=9999 

GOSUB1260 

0=0 

forzi==ito4000:me;<:t21 

I F22=2THENT2K=T2K+T l ', 

if22=itheht3:-:=T3:-:+ti:- 
i fx4= 1 anh i =0theh399o 
ifx4o2then3670 

IFZ2=2THEH3650 

IFT37OT2XTHEN3670 

X7=l 

GDTO3990 

IFT2JOT3KTHEN3670 

G0T03630 

IFX4=3THEN3990 

IFX4=lflNBI=lTHEM 

IFZ2=2THEHQ=1 

IFZ2=1THENQ=2 

IFX4O1THEN3760 
I$="2NH IHH" 
C*="X" 
GOTO4310 

ti;:=0 
U2:-;=0 
li:;=0 
L2"/.=0 

Ei;:=o 
o;:=0 

IFX4=1THEN3850 

X4=X4+1 

GOTO 1060 

FORZ3=1T02 

F0RZ4=1T011 

O1X<Z3,Z4)=0 

Wlf.CZ: 

R1J{<Z 

B1KCZ 




...:,■ „;, 







FIX 
hi:* 
E2Ji 

SI"; 
HEX 



Z4:; 

24>=0 

245=0 
Z4)=0 
Z4!)=0 
Z4) = " 
Z4)=0 
Z4>=G 




(.23 
TZ4 
NEXTZ3 
GOTO3830 

REM - END OF MATCH 
PR I NT "3" 
PRINT" 3RESULT " 
PRINT"** Mil" A* 

ift2;-;:>t3;-:theh4070 
ift3jot2xthen4090 . 

PR I NT " %»»»»»l:3IiREW HI TH " 

GOTO4100 

PR I NT " WMMMMUBEftT " 

GOTO4100 

PRINT" IMHMMMdLOST TO" 

PRIHT":i*MH"H* 

IFT3«>T25JTHENT45i=T3K-T2X 

IFT2-OT3%THENT4?:=T2':-T3': 

IFT2K=>T3XTHEN4170 

PRINT" WtMimWIWIBV : -M" 

IFI=2THEN4180 

PR I NT " limiinil" T4K " RUNS " 

FORQ= 1 TO2O00 : NEXTQ ■ G0T043 1 

IFX7O1THEH4210 

PRINT"WW*BN INNINGS RND "T4:;" 

FORQ= 1 TO2000 : NEXTQ : G0T043 1 

IFU2";=10THEN4240 

pr i nt " i»»»i»»t»r 1 0-U2;-: " w i cket 

FORQ=1TO2000 : NEXTQ : GQTO4310 
FORZl=lfnil 

IFH1*= DRH1*=" "THEH4270 

X6X=X6?i+l 

HEXTZ1 

IFXSK=10THEN4160 

W2K=X65i 

GOTO4220 

REM - STATISTICS 

PR I NT " 2B0HL I HG F I GURES " 




4330 
4340 
4350 
4360 
4370 
4380 
4390 
4400 
4410 
4420 
4430 
4440 
4450 
4460 
4470 
4480 
4490 
45G0 
4510 
4520 
4530 
4540 
4550 
4560 
4570 
4580 
4590 
4600 
4610 
4620 
4630 
4640 
4650 
4660 
4670 
4630 
4690 
4700 
4710 
4720 
4730 
4740 
4750 
4760 
4770 
4780 
4790 
4800 
4810 
4820 
4830 
4840 
4850 
4860 
4870 
4880 
4890 
490O 
4910 
4920 
4930 
4940 
4950 
4960 
4970 
4980 
4990 
5000 
5010 
5020 
5030 
5040 
5050 
5060 
5070 
5380 
5090 
510O 
5110 
5120 
5130 
5140 
5150 
5160 
5170 
5180 
5190 
5200 
5210 
5220 
5230 
5240 
5250 
5260 
5270 



14) 

SOTO4430 
21) 



PRIHT"M"N*" :-M" 

Z5=l 

PRINT" M 

F0RZ1=1T011 

IFOl":CZ5,Zi:>=0THEH4630 

IFZK10THENPRINT" "; 

PRINTZ1LEFT*(P1*CZ5,Z1> 

T=0 

IFO1V<Z5,Z1X10THEHT=2: 

IFOlX<Z5,21Ki00THENT=l 

PRIHT":rTfiB<;i7+T>01-:<25 

T=0 

IFW1SC25, Zl X10THENT=2 : GOTO4470 

IFUi:-«25<21K100THENT=l 

PRIHT"1"TflB(21+T:'Wi;-;!:Z5,Zi::' 

T=0 

IFR1K(25,21)<10THENT=2:GOTO4510 

I FR 1 ■■: < 25- 21 Kl 00THEHT= 1 

PRINT"n"TflE(25+T;Rl^(Z5,Zi:' 

T=0 ' 

i fe2m '■ z5 1 2 1 ) < 1 0thent=2 : g0t0455 

ife2;;<25,z1x100thent=1 

print i "1"tfiec28+t:'E2";!:25,zi) 

Z6?i=<RlS;<25;Zl)+E2X<25 < 2i:>;'*10 

Z6=Z6;-i/100 

T=0 

IFZSO0THENT=2 : GOTO4620 

IFZ6<100THENT=1 

PRIHT"n"TfiE(31+T>Z6 

NEXTZ1 

IFZ5=2THEH468S 

F'RINT"M"A*":-M" 

GOTO4330 

25=1 

GOSl IE5390 

Ul$=fl*:T9K=8 

IFZ5=1THENU1*=N* 

PRINT"3BTTING FIGURES - "Ui* 

PRINT" NAME 

PRINT" ,„■■ -■-■■■■■— ..,.,....—— 

F0RZ1=1T011 

IFZK10THENPRINT" ", 

PRIHTZ1LEFT*(P1*(Z5,Z1), 18) 

T=0 

IFBtX<25,21X10THEHT=2:GOTO48 

IFE1%':Z5,Z1>C100THENT=1 

PRINT'TJ* TflB<22+T)Bl"i<Z5;Zl) 

T=0 

IFB3%(Z5, Zl K10THENT=2 ; G0T048 

I FB3K i Z5 , Z 1 X 1 80THENT= 1 

PRINT"rl"TfiBC25+T)B3"/«Z5iZl) 

C1$=H1*(Z5,Z1) 



R E flVG 




EL H/OT SCR' 



'QRC1*= 



'THEN4890 



30)C1* 



><10THENT= 
»<100THENT=1 

::34+t:'S1";cz5,zi; 

2D+T9K 



GOT04S 



OT 



:•<?■;:■-< 



EXTRflS"THEC 



IFC1$=" 

GOTO4920 

ifcd1then4920 
q=q+i 

Cl$="SH/05" 

PR I NT "D" THE 

T=0 

IFS1-;<Z5,Z1 

IFS1/XZ5,Z1 

PR I NT "H!" TAB 

T3?i=Sl?;<25- 

NEXTZ1 

T=0 

IFE1X<10THENT=2: 

IFEi:-;<100THEHT=l 

PRINT'S! 

T9"*»T9Z+E3XCZ3> 

PRIHTTAEOS)"— " 

T=0 

IFT9;:<10THENT=2 ■ GOTO5080 

IFT9;;<100THENT=1 

PRINTTAEC27) "TOTAL "TflB<34+T)T9X 

PRINT'TALL OF WICKETS :-"TflB<35)"( 

F0RZ1=1T09 

PRIHTFi:;(Z5,Zl X,"; 

IFZ1=5THEHPRINT 

NEXTZ1 

PR I NT "T 

GOSUB5390 

IFC*="S"AHBZ5=2THENX2=> 

IFC*="X"flHDZ5=2THEN376f 

IFZ5=2THENPRINT"L1" : END 



700 ■ 
CHANGE BOWLER 

11 y 

"BOWLER ONE:-" 
"M"E5;PUCZ3,E5> 

I"' (CHANGE CV/N)" 
:IFC:*=""THEN5260 
IFCt="H"THEN5300 
"MBOWLER H0.";B5 

C10RB5M1THEK 
"SBOWIER TWO>- 
"M"E6;P1*<Z3,E 
"MCHANGE CV/H) 
:IFC*=""THEh 
"N" THEN3240 
"MBOWLER N0.";B6 

:1ORE6>11THEH5300 



240 

"MSPRESS RNV KEV't 

*-'IFCl**""THEN5400^ 





®&VG OCTOBER 1984 



Remember the top selling 'Jack and the 
Beanstalk' from Thor software? Well all 
you Commodore 64 owners out there 
have the chance to win a copy of this 
great game as Games Computing in 
conjunction with Thor are giving them 
away as prizes. 

Spectrum, BBC, and VIC 20 owners 
are not left out either — two other great 
Thor games are up for grabs, The Giant's 
Revenge for the Spectrum, and Ollie for 
the VIC 20. 

90 tapes can be won and these 
games are the latest and greatest when 
it comes to new software. 

Jack and the Beanstalk is the best 
selling graphics adventure for the Spec- 
trum that got to number 1 in most 
charts, it has now been converted for 
the Commodore 64 and the result is 
really impressive. The idea of the game 
is to travel through six hi-res screens to 
try and chop the giant for good. 

Gaints Revenge is the sequel to Jack 
and the Beanstalk and runs on a Spec- 
trum. In this game the giant has landed 
on the ground and dug himself some 
caves and caverns. Your task is to dig 
him out and finish him off once and for 
all. 

Ollie for the VIC 20 casts you as a 
diver after some pearls — of course 
Ollie the octopus doesn't want you to 
get them. You'll need cunning and agili- 
ty to get around this game. 

Also you may choose any game from 
Thor's current range for the BBC, VIC, 
Spectrum, or Commodore 64. 



Thor is relatively new on the soft- 
ware scene having only been in opera- 
tion since last Christmas. In that time 
they have made their mark with games 
such as Twilight Zone, Night Stalker, 
and Gremlins. All these you can win. 

How to Enter 

On this page is a wordsquare grid and a 
list of Thor products. All you have to do 
is ring the names of the games When 
you have ringed the names there should 
be some letters left — this forms a 
sentence and some letters. Write this 
on the back of the envelope with your 
entry in and write it in the area reserved 
for it on the coupon. 

When you fill in the coupon don't 
forget to state your name, address, 
telephone number, and age. We also 
need to know what computer and what 
game you want. The game can be 
selected from any in the list for the 
wordsquare. Put the coupon and the 
completed wordsquare in an envelope 
and send it to us — simple! 

Next to the list for the wordsquare is 
a list of machines that the program runs 
on — DO NOT use the names of the 
computers in the wordsquare as there 
are none there, just the names of the 
games. 

Send all your entries to: 

Games Computing/Thor Competition 
1 Golden Square 
London W1R 3AB 



List of Words 



Programs 

Jack and the 
Beanstalk 
Ollie 

Giants Revenge 
Twilight Zone 
Wonder Worm 
Gremlins 
Night Stalker 
Love Bug 
Blocker 
Mega Fruit 
3D Silicon Fish 



Computers they run on 

Spectrum 

Commodore 64 

VIC 20 

Spectrum 

Spectrum 

BBC 

Spectrum 

Spectrum 

VIC 20 + 3K or 8K 

BBC 

Spectrum 

VIC 20 

Commodore 64 



Competition Rules 

1 . This competition is open to all UK 
readers of Games Computing, ex- 
cept employees of Argus Specialist 
Publications Ltd, their printers and 
distributors, employees of Thor or 
anyone connected with them. 

2. As long as the correct coupon is us- 
ed for each entry there is not limit to 
the number of entries per person, 
photocopies wilt not be accepted. 

3. All enries must be postmarked 
before 31 st October. 

4. The prizes will be awarded to the 
first 90 entries judged to be correct 
by the editor. 

5. No correspondence will be entered 
into with regard to the competition 
results and it is a condition of entry 
that the editor's decision is final. 

6. The winners will be notified by post 
and the results will be published in a 
future issue of Games Computing. 



w 


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s 


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D 


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Send to: GAMES COMPUTING/THOR COMPETITION 
1 Golden Square, London W1R 3AB 

Computer: 

Program: 

Answer: 



Name: . . 
Address: 



Telephone: Age: 




GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



43 



commodore news 

from SUPERSOFT 



NEM RELEASES 

MUSIC MASTER 

At last, a commonsense program -for ordinary people. You needn't 

know anything about music (or computers)! There's no easier way 

to make music with your 64, and no easier way to learn about 

music. 

GRAPHICS DESIGNER 

The only all machine code sprite and character editor. Joystick 

or keyboard control \ easy to learn, and easy to use. 

BUSICALC 3 

The long-awaited three-dimensional version of the •famous BUSICALC 

program. All the features of BUSICALC and BUSICALC 2 plus bar 

charts, password protection, links with EASYSCRIPT & VIZAWRITE and 

much more. The only logical answer to three dimensions on the 64! 

STAR COMMAND 

Three-dimensional space combat game with convincing graphics. 

IMTERDICTOR PILOT 

Forget ordinary flight simulators! You'll probably never pilot, a 

jumbo - but you might well fly a spaceship. The 48-page manual 

describes in detail the Interdictor Mk3 craft, and teaches the 

basics of space combat. Learn in the simulator, then go on to fly 

real mi ssions ! 

RESKY RA INTER 

A superb adaptation of the classic Amidar game? 

(thanks to GRAPHICS DESIGNER), superb music 
MASTER) . 

STAR CRASH 

Music by Dvorak, program by the Common Market 
Minter. Arcade action from France with just a 



excellent graphics 
(thanks to MUSIC 



s answer to Jeff 
hint of Star Trek. 



TITLES CURRI 

BUSICALC <*) £17.95 

BUSICALC 2 <*) £49.95 

BUSICALC 3 <D> £75.00 

MASTER 64 (D) £69.00 

VI CTREE (C) £56.35 

MIKRO (C) £57.50 

ARROW (C) £44.85 

ZOOM <*) £11.50 

ZOOM <C) £28.75 

1541 BACKUP (D) £13.80 

PR INTL. INK <*) £29.90 

PETLINK (*> £36.80 

TAGS0RT <*) £11.50 

SUPERS0RT <*> £25.30 

COMPACTOR <*> £9.20 

RENUMBER (*> £8.05 

TAPE MERGE (T) £8.05 

GRAPHIX 64 <#> £11.50 



:ntly av/ailabi 

inter pilot <*) £17.95 
music master (*) £17.95 
graphics design (*)£9.95 
star command <*> £6.95 
pesky painter <*> £6.95 
star crash (#) £6.95 
halls of death <*> £8.95 
lord of balrogsc*) £6.95 
crazy kong <*) £3.95 

3D-GL00PER <*) £8.95 

COSMIC CAPERS <*> £7.95 

CRACKS OF FIRE <*) £7.95 

BURGER CHASE <*) £6.95 

TANK ATAK (*) £8.95 

MANGROVE <*) £8.95 

STS OF LONDON <*) £8.95 

GOBLIN TOWERS <*) £9.95 

F0RESTLAND <*) £9.95 



ST IX (#) £8.95 
ST IX <C> £19.95 
XER0NS (*) £5.95 
WILDFIRE (*) £6. 95 
KAKTUS (*) £8.95 
SPP ( D ) 



(C) plug-in 
cartr i dge 

(D) disk only 

(T) tape only 

(#) tape price 
add £2 for 
disk copy 



.Orders prepaid by chegue are post free in UK. We now accept ACCECSS 



<§> SUPERSOFT 



Winchester House, Canning Road, Wealdstone, 
Harrow, Middlesex, HA3 7SJ 

Telephone: 01-861 1 166 



The object of the game is to land the 
Helicopter On the pad at the left side of 
the Oil Rig. Full instructions are includ- 
ed. 

To play this game, you will need one 
joystick plugged into the left-most con- 
trol port of any Atari Computer with 
1 6K RAM and a BASIC cartridge. 

The program uses the Atari 
"Player Missile graphics." and a GR.23 
(7+16) playfield. 

If anybody wants to convert this pro- 
gram to run on other systems, I would 
suggest that you study the "Run 
Down" and start from scratch. This is 
due to the fact that P/M graphics are 
unique to Atari computers and the only 
system that comes close is the C.B.M. 
64. and also because vertical move- 
ment is done using machine code 
routines. Alternatively one could use 
Re-defined characters. 

The machine code addresses are as 
follows: 
Up = 1536 
Down = 1566 



PSTART 



l,W,N 
J 



UP 



DOWN 



NUM 



key to be pressed. 
Used to draw oil rig Er 
then it is used to 
position the helicopter 
on the screen. 
Used as 'X' but for 
vertical co-ordinates. 
Page corresponding to 
P/M graphics base 
address. 

Starting address of P/M 
graphics RAM for Player 
0. 

Loop variables. 
Used to READ DATA 
from DATA statements. 
Start address of 
Machine code routine to 
move helicopter up. 
Start address of 
Machine code routine to 
move helicopter down. 
Value last taken from 
STICK (0) 
Used to generate 
head/ tail winds. 







P,P1,P2,V,C SOUND com 


Variab 


les Used 


variables. 


DL 


Display list base 
address + 3 


RUNdown 


SC 


Score. 


Lines Action 


HSC 


High Score. . 




LI 


Number of lives left. 


5 Set variables 


KEY 


ATASCII Code of last 


10-90 Start screen. 



100-195 


Draw oil rig in GR.7 


200-230 


Define P/M graphics for 




helicopter. 


240-285 


Define Machine code 




routines to move 




helicopter. 


300-350 


Read joystick & move 




helicopter. 


360 


Test for landing. 


370 


Test for collision with 




oil rig or lightning bolt. 


380 


GOSUB display score. 




high score & lives left. 


390 


Lightning strike. 




Changes colour register 




and makes a noise. 


394-396 


Simulate Head/Tail wind 




by automatically moving 




helicopter. 


400 


Go back to 300 


1000-1040 


Stop helicopter engines 




after landing. 


2000-2090 


Helicopter hit object so 




blow it up. 


3000 


Display scores. 


4000-4010 


Test for all lives lost. 


5000-5070 


"GAME OVER" 




Routine. 




Update high score. 




Reset variables Er wait 




for 'FIRE' to be pressed. 


6000-6010 


Erase helicopter after a 




successful landing. 


7000-7020 


Draw /Erase lightning 




bolt. 



10000- 
10070 



Display instructions. 







(ft 





In 





S SC=0:LI=3:HSC=100 

10 6RAPHICS 1B:SETCDL0R 0,0,13 

20 POSITION 2,2s? #6 l" HELICOPTER PILOT" 

40 POSITION 3,4i? #6j"BY ANDREW SHAW" 

50 POSITION 4,6: ? #6} "INSTRUCTIONS" 

60 POSITION 8,8: ? #6: "Y/N?" 

70 OPEN #1,4,0, "K" 

B0 SET #1, KEY: IF KEY-B9 THEN BOSUB 10000: SOTO 100 

90 IF KEY07B THEN B0 

100 GRAPHICS 23:SETC0L0R 0,8,2: SETCOLOR 1 ,0, 15: SETCOLOR 

2, 9, 2: SETCOLOR 4,9,2:C0L0R llPOKE 752,1 
105 DL-PEEK(560)+256#PEEK(561)+3:POKE DL+3,2:P0KE DL.66 
SPOKE DL+4,2 
108 QOSUB 3000 

110 PLOT 80.609DRAWTO 120,60:PLOT 80. 61: DRAWTO 120,61 
120 PLOT 82.60IDRAWTO S2,55lPL0T SB, 60: DRAWTO 88,55:PL0 
T 80, 55 t DRAWTO 90,55 

130 PLOT 82, 55: DRAWTO 88, 60: PLOT 82,601 DRAWTO 88,55 
140 PLOT 95,60:DRAWTO 95,20:DRAWTO 105, 20: DRAWTO 105,60 
150 FOR X=20 TO 50 STEP 10:PLOT 95,X:DRAWT0 105,X+10:PL 
OT 105, X: DRAWTO 95,X+10sNEXT X 

160 FOR X-107 TO 118:PL0T X,45:DRAWT0 X,60:NEXT X 
170 COLOR 2:F0R X-109 TO 117 STEP 2:F0R Y-48 TO 56 STEP 

2: PLOT X,Y:NEXT Y:NEXT X 
180 COLOR IsFOR X-B2 TO B61PLOT X,62sDRAWT0 X,B0:NEXT X 
190 FOR X-112 TO 116SPL0T X,62:DRAWT0 X,B0:NEXT X 
195 COLOR 1: BOSUB 7000 

200 A-PEEK<106)-32:POKE 54279, A: POKE 559,62: X-70:Y»B0:P 
OKE 5324B,0:PSTART-(A»256)+1024:POKE 53277, 3:P0KE 704,1 
5 

205 POKE 53256, 2iP0KE 5327B, 255 1 POKE 623,4 
210 FOR I-PSTART-Y TO PSTART+255:P0KE 1, 08 NEXT I 
220 FOR I-PSTART+Y TO PSTART+7+YsREAD JsPOKE I.JiNEXT I 
230 DATA 0,28,148,214,255,126,68,255 

235 FOR 1-0 TO X:POKE 53248 , I : SOUND 0,255, 10, 14: SOUND 
,0,0,0:FOR W-l TO 10INEXT W:NEXT I: SOUND 0,0,0,0 
240 UP-1536:DOWN»UP+30 

250 FOR I-UP TO UP+201READ J:POKE I,J:NEXT I 
260 DATA 104,104,133,204,104,133,203,160,1,177,203,136, 
145,203,200,200,192,11,208,245,96 
270 FOR I-DOWN TO DOWN+20:READ J:POKE I,J:NEXT I 
280 DATA 104,104,133,204,104,133,203,160,10,177,203,200 
,145,203,136,136,192,255,208,245,96 
285 SOUND 3,255,2,4 
290 REM MAIN LOOP FOLLOWS 
300 S-STICK(0):IF S-15 THEN 390 

310 IF S-5 OR S-6 OR S-7 THEN IF X<200 THEN X-X+2 
320 IF S-9 OR 8-10 OR S-ll THEN IF X>50 THEN X-X-2 
330 IF S-10 OR 8-14 OR S-6 THEN IF Y>45 THEN FOR N-l TO 

2:Z-USR(UP,PSTART+Y):Y-Y-1:NEXT N 
340 IF S-5 OR S-9 OR S-13 THEN IF Y<240 THEN FOR N-l TO 

2: Z-USR (DOWN, PSTART+Y) I Y-Y+l J NEXT N 
350 POKE 53248.X 



360 IF X>i2B AND X<132 AND Y-152 THEN COLOR 01GOSUB 700 

0:BOTO 1000 

370 IF PEEK (53252) -1 THEN GOSUB 2000 

380 BOSUB 3000 

390 IF RND(0)>0.9 THEN FOR S-0 TO 30:SOUND 0,3,6, 10:POK 

E 70S, S: NEXT S: SOUND 0,0, 0,0: POKE 708,130 

394 NUM-RND(0) 

395 IF NUM>0.5 THEN X-X+ltPOKE 53248, X 

396 IF NUM<0.5 THEN X-X-l:POKE 53248, X 
400 SOTO 300 

1000 FOR Pl-0 TO 100 STEP 25 

1010 FOR P2-0 TO 50 

1020 SOUND 0,P1+P2,10,10|NEXT P2:NEXT PI 

1030 SOUND 0,0,0,0:9C=3C+100iSOSUB 3000IPOKE PSTART+Y, 8 

IPOKE PSTART+(Y-1>,126 

1040 POKE 704,15: SETCOLOR 0,3,6:GOTO 6000 

2000 FOR N-l TO 4 

2005 FOR I-PSTART+Y TO PSTART+Y+7: POKE I, INT(RND(0>#256 

):POKE 704,INT(RND(0)*256) 

2010 SOUND 0,255-RND(0)*254,8,14:FOR W-l TO 10:NEXT W:N 

EXT Is NEXT N 

2015 POKE 704,253»POKE PSTART+Y-1,0|POKE PSTART+Y, 

2020 FOR V-15 TO STEP -1 

2025 FOR A-l TO 15: Z-USR(DOWN, PSTART+Y) :Y-Y+1:NEXT A 

2030 SOUND 0,255,6,V:FOR W-l TO 10INEXT WiNEXT V 

2080 FOR W-l TO 400! NEXT W 

2090 QOSUB 4000SPOP sRESTORE iPOKE 704, PEEK (712) : SOTO 1 

00 

3000 POKE 87,0:POSITION 4, It? "SCORE: ";SC: " LIVES: "jLI 

I" HI SCORE:" j HSC:: POKE B7,7:RETURN 

4000 LI-LI-1«IF LI-0 THEN GOTO 5000 

4010 RETURN 

5000 BRAPHICS 18:P0KE 708, ISiPOKE 53277, 0IPOSITION 5,2: 

? #6| "SAME OVER!" 

5005 FOR P-0 TO 3:S0UND P,0,0,0:NEXT P 

5010 POSITION 5,4i? #6) "SCORE: " j SC 

5020 IF SOHSC THEN HSC-SC 

5030 POSITION 4,6:? #6; "HI SCORE: "{HSC 

5040 POSITION 1,8:? #6: "PRESS TRIS TO START" 

5045 FOR W-l- TO 300: NEXT W 

5050 IF STRIS(0)-1 THEN 5050 

5060 IF SOHSC THEN HSC-SC 

5070 LI-3:SC-0: RESTORE tBOTO 100 

6000 FOR C-0 TO 3:S0UND C,0,0,0:NEXT C:FOR W-l TO 500:N 

EXT W 

6010 POKE 704,PEEK(712):RESTORE iSOTO 100 

7000 PLOT 50,10iDRAWTO 4S,20lDRAWTO 46,30:DRAWTO 45,40 

7010 REM PLOT 51,10:DRAWTO 49,20:DRAWTO 47,30:DRAWTO 46 

,40 

7020 RETURN 

10000 BRAPHICS 0:SETCOLOR 2, 8, 2: SETCOLOR 1,0,15:POKE 75 

2,1 

10005 ? :? "HELICPOTER PILOT" 

10010 ? :? " YOU PLAY THE PART OF A HELICOPTER PILOT 

. YOU ARE BRINBINS THE MENjWHO WORK ON THE OIL RIB,"; 

10020 ? "URGENTLY NEEDED SUPLIES. ALL YOU HAVE TO DO 

IS LAND YOUR HELICOPTER ON THE HELI-PAD. " 

10030 ? " IF IT SOUNDS TOO EASY TO BELIEVE, DONT THI 

NB SO! THERE IS AS USUAL ONE PROBLEM....." 

10040 ? :? "YOU MUST LAND AT NIBHT, IN A BAD THUND 

ER STORM." 

10050 ? !? , "PRESS TRIG TO START" 

10060 IF STRIG(0)-1 THEN 10060^ 

10070 RETURN 





Track Testing 

Acorn are indulging in one of the most ^^ ^^ 



Acorn are indulging in one of the most 
expensive sports possible — motor rac- 
ing. The annual budget is around 
1 00,000 or 500 Electrons. That's doing 
it cheaply, the form of motorsport 
they've gone for is Formula 3, if they 
were into Formula 1 you could probably 
add a zero to those figures. 

Formula 3 is very tightly controlled, 
the limits mean that all the cars are very 
similar, there are only two major 
choices of engines, Toyota or 
Volkswagen, two types of tyre, wet or 
dry, and many regulations regarding the 
weight and dimensions of the car. 

The upshot of this is a race between 
drivers rather than a race between cars. 
This does not mean that a Formula 3 
race is anything but a team effort. 
There are full time mechanics working 
on the car and constantly preparing it 
for the next race. The atmosphere is 
one of terrific tension, motor racing has 
the air and the electricity of horse racing 
but without the gambling. 

Team Effort 

To a spectator a motor race is a one 
day event, for the team it is closer to a 
week. The cars are taken to the circuit 
well in advance of the race and the 
teams install themselves in the pits, a 
row of double ended garages along the 
side of the track. Tyres are critical, they 
work best when warm, over 80 
degrees, and have no tread on them. 
The purpose of tread on a tyre is to cut 
between water on the road, in a race it 
is possible to choose a tyre for the con- 
ditions — wet or dry. The wet weather 
tyres look much more like road tyres 
and are significantly slower than the 
slicks. 

After a few laps of the track the hot 
slicks pick up the rubber left by previous 
races. I spoke to the driver of the Acorn 
sponsored car, David Hunt, whose 
brother James won the Formula One 
championship and has now retired from 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



Simon Rockman has just had first hand experience of Motor racing and 
found it almost as good as computer car games! 



motor racing. He has taken the usual 
route in motor racing, he started with 
junior karts, progressed through For- 
mulas and into Formula 3. In Formula 3 
it is the driver's job to find a sponsor 
and a team, to do this he has to be both 
a businessman and capable of selling 
himself to potential sponsors, they have 
to be convinced that they will be getting 
value for their money, Acorn certainly 
seem to be. David appreciates the com- 
mittment that Acorn have to racing, 
you may not hear about it much in com- 
puiter magazines but in the non- 
specialist press David and Acorn have 
had a lot of coverage. 

Computers have sidled their way in- 
to David Hunt's life through Acorn. He 
runs a business selling fast cars, Acorn 
have written a system to allow him to 
match buyers and sellers for these 



pricey toys. The main prerequisite for 
these cars is speed, a luxury saloon may 
be interesting to most people but unless 
it is really fast David Hunt will not deal 
with it. 

To some extent David Hunt's com- 
pany is being used as a guinea pig by 
Acornsoft, if his system proves suc- 
cessful it may be marketed. Acornsoft 
are doing a fair bit if specialist work on 
customised systems they have are not 
very newsworthy. 

He Drives His 
Grandmother's Mini! 

It came as quite a surprise to me to 
learn that David did not actually own a 
car, I was expecting him to tell me that 





he had a rare Ferrari, instead he drives 
his grandmother's Mini, although he did 
later admit to arriving in a Porsche. 

David said that his brother's success 
was both a help and a hinderance, it 
adds some celebrity value to his name 
but he has to get over to people that he 
is a different person and has to win his 
own battles. He said that he rarely talks 
about racing at home. 

Motor racing is about winning, se- 
cond best is not good enough. But the 
prize money is tiny, in a race which 
costs thousands of pounds to enter in 
fuel and time, the first prize is two hun- 
dred pounds. 

The main tie up between Acornsoft 
and Acorn Computer Racing is the 
research for a forthcoming Pole Position 
type game. This is the result of my 
hours of discussion between David 
Hunt and Geoffrey Crammond (author 
of Aviator). The game will be based on 
the Acorn Formula 3 car, racing around 
a real track, probably Brands Hatch or 
Silverstone. It will be in colour. Aviator 
is black and white for smoothness. 
There will be an exceptional amount of 
control over the car. Unlike the Lo and 
Hi gear arrangement of the Atari game 
there will be five gears and a clutch. 
David was rather scathing of the arcade 
game because it is possible to drive 
around the whole course at full ac- 
celeration, racing isn't like that and so 
the Acornsoft game will be much more 
difficult, you will need to brake. A rac- 
ing car has adjustments for the front 
and rear anti-roll bars, so there will be 
control over these in the Acornsoft 
game. There will be other cars on the 
track and if one of them wants to over- 
take you you will see it in a rear view 
mirror. 

Putting You In The 
Cockpit 

One of the major limitations of the 
arcade games is that you are not inside 
the car but looking at it from above and 
behind. The Crammond version will put 
you in the car's cockpit, with full view of 
the oil and water temperature and 
pressure gauges, the all important rev 



counter but no speedo. Real racing cars 
don't have speedometers, lap times are 
far more important. I doubt that the ac- 
curacy will be carried as far as the 
length of the race, I don't think my 
fingers could stand thirty odd laps of 
keyboard pounding, I'm sure that the 
Beeb wouldn't like it. The game sounds 
very promising, but will not be out for a 
fair while, the specification is very am- 
bitious and some of the features may 
have to be dropped to squeeze it into 
the Beeb's memory. 

The Beeb's speaker will not be able 
to do justice to the unsilenced engine 
noise, standing in the paddock sur- 
rounded by a horde of revving cars is 
simply deafening, many of the regular 
mechanics wear ear protectors. 

One advantage of playing at home is 
the comfort as real motor racing is a 
very tiring sport. Drivers in hot races 
can lose a litre of water in sweat and so 
have to keep fit. David Hunt does not do 



anything special to keep in trim and 
does not have to watch his weight but 
is a fit and athletic person. 

The car is built around the driver. To 
climb in, the side plate sized steering 
wheel has to be removed and then be 
locked back into place once the driver is 
comfortable. The cars are started in the 
paddock and crawl out onto the track in 
an orderly procession. They do a single 
warm up lap and then sit tense, ready to 
race. 

Starting positions are decided by 
practice times, the fastest cars go to 
the front and have a considerable ad- 
vantage. The Acorn Computer car had 
not been performing well and so had on- 
ly qualified for twelfth position. As the 
race started the cars shot into the first 
bend of the Snetterton track (Riches 
corner), the acceleration in this kind of 
car is amazing, to 60 in about three 
seconds and on to 1 30mph, the corner- 
ing grip is stunning, the tightest bends 
on the track, The Esses. A saloon car 
would corner here at about 40, David 
Hunt's car took them at three times 
that. 

The Race Is On 

In the first lap the green and white 
Acorn car moved from twelfth to fifth. 
This seven place move put David Hunt 
in the running for points, the leading 
cars were soon well away with many 
seconds lead. The lap times for David 
Hunt's car varied very little, between 
26.1 and 26.9 seconds, but a tenth of 
a second really makes a huge dif- 
ference. 

David did a magnificent job of hang- 
ing onto his place and despite dropping 
back to 6th managed to hold there and 
come in fifth after one of the leading 
cars dropped out. David's girlfriend said 
that he would be disappointed with fif- 
th, racing is about winning, but then it 
was a commendable drive and an ex- 
citing race. 

Even if you are not a motor racing 
fan a day at the track is great fun and 
quite a spectacle. I would highly recom- 
mend it. 




50 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



By Sue Bartlett and Mike Roberts 




TURBO 

Runs on: Colecovision 
Made by: CBS Electronics 
Price: Comes with Expansion 

Module 2 at £50 



To play Turbo you need Expansion Module 
2 — Turbo Drive Module, which fits into a 
Colecovision system. This expansion 
module consists of a steering wheel, a 
dashboard and an accelerator pedal. You 
also use a Colecovision hand controller 
which fits into the dashboard enabling you 
to change gear. 

The Turbo Driver game cartridge is pro- 
vided with the unit. When plugged into the 
CBS Colecovision console you actually 
drive your way through towns and tunnels, 
and negotiate obstacles and hazards in this 
exciting race. Other games are to be 
available which make use of the Turbo 
Drive Module too. 

In Turbo, the game provided with the 
unit, there are four skill options and these 
can be chosen by pressing the correspon- 
ding number on the hand controller 
keypad. Lower skills are slower and have 
fewer cars and obstacles. 

The first thing you see on the screen is a 
set of traffic lights and your car. Once the 
lights turn green you may shift into a low 
gear for a faster start and then shift into a 
high gear, using the control stick on the 
Colecovision hand controllers. 

Each car you pass increases your points 
total and gets you closer to extended play. 



Video News 

Atari: Some weeks ago Atari was 
bought from Warner Communications, 
for an undisclosed sum in the low 
millions, by Jack Tramiel. Jack Tramiel 
is one of the founders of Commodore 
but left after a shake up of top manage- 
ment earlier this year. Atari lost many 
millions of dollars last year and its new 
boss has started a clean sweep to get 
Atari on its feet. 

The company has also changed 
name from 'Atari International (UK)' to 
'Atari Corporation (UK)'. The changes 
in Atari put some of its new products in 
doubt. The Atari 7800, billed as a Col- 
ecovision beater, is unlikely to appear 
on the British scene until after 
Christmas, however the Atari 2600Jr 
looks like it and will be launched on time 
for the Christmas rush. There is no 
news of what new games will be out so 
watch these pages for details. 

Activision: The high-profile 
American games company famous for 
games like 'River Raid', 'HERO', and 
'Space Shuttle' has started to drift 
away from its video game roots. The 
newest releases from Activision are for 
the Commodore 64 and other com- 
puters. 

To mark its entry into the home com- 



This is shown on the score indicator and 
the 'cars pafesed indicator'. For each car 
that passes you your total decreases. 

If your tyres rub against the border, you 
will hear a squealing sound and your car 
will slow down. A collision brings you to a 
stop and this gives other cars a chance to 
race past. You may start up again by gear- 
ing down. 

You must pass a certain number of cars 
in a stated time otherwise your car blows 
up. If you achieve the number stated the 
next skill sheet will appear, getting faster 
everytime you go onto a higher skill. 

In the race you have to avoid oil slicks 
and an ambulance, which, unlike most am- 
bulances tries to kill and not save you! You 
have to drive through cities, countries, 
mountain roads, on dangerous sea-side 
road curves and in icy conditions which 
can be difficult as your car tends to slip all 
over the road. 

Provided with Turbo there is an owner's 
manual and a Cartridge Instructions 
booklet. These are both clear and concise. 
The owner's manual contains instruction 
for connecting the expansion module to 
the Colecovision, care of the game, and 
problems that may occur while playing and 
their solutions. 

The Cartridge Instruction booklet con- 
tains clear pictures of the screen which 



Vying 



show you what to expect before playing 
the game. Also, the number of points and 
where they can be gained are printed at the 
back of the booklet. 

Overall, this game is well worth the 
price you have to pay. Graphics are good 
and control is accurate. On higher skill 
levels your car goes round the course at a 
hair-raising speed, making this a very ex- 
citing game to play. 



Arcades 

The latest hot game in the arcades is by 
Atari and is called 'Star Rider'. The 
game puts you on the saddle of a high 
speed jet cycle racing against four other 
computer controlled bikes. The 
backdrop graphics are by a laser disk 
with sundry images created by the main 
computer. 

Most video disk games look a bit 
'tacky' because when you die your 
computer generated space ship is turn- 
ed into an optically generated explosion 
— very confusing. Where Star Rider is 
different is that the backdrops are also 
computer generated, but by a very big 
multi-million pound dedicated graphics 
computer like the one that made TRON 
or the Olympics titles for the BBC. The 
backdrops are of various race tracks all 
over the galaxy and have stunning 
scenery. 

We may do a feature on how to beat 
this game, but first we have to get past 
level four and at 30p a time we will 
have to save up our pocket money! 




puter market Activision has taken the 
Cornish software company Microdeal 
to court. Microdeal is a company that 
takes a hard line on software piracy, yet 
most of its own games are direct copies 
or unlicensed 'enhancements' of other 
people's ideas. The Microdeal game 
•'Cuthbert in the Jungle' is a perfect 
copy of Activision's 'Pitfall' game for 
the VCS/Coiecovision. 

As Activision are moving into the 
computer market it would be a bit silly 



to have two identical programs on the 
market at the same time. 

The proceedings for an injunction 
against Microdeal were resolved when 
"Microdeal gave undertakings that it 
would not make any further copies of 
'Pitfall' or sell any more copies of their 
game 'Cuthbert in the Jungle' ". 

Geoff Heath, Managing Director of 
Activision UK, said that they "would 
not hesitate to take action again should 
the occasion arise". 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



51 



VideoVy 



MINER 204 9 er 

Runs on: Colecovision 
Made by: CBS Electronics 
Price: £29.95 



The objective of Miner 2049er is for 
Bounty Bob to survive all 1 1 game 
levels. To reach each successive level, 
Bounty Bob must 'mask' the entire 
framework on the present level before 
the time display reaches zero. After all 
the framework has been filled in, the 
time left on the clock is converted into 
points and added to your score. Other 
means of scoring include collecting 
miner tools, destroying mutants, and 
eating TNT! An extra Bob is rewarded 
when 10,000, 30,000 and 50,000 
points are reached. 

The first screen consists of ladders 
which Bob can climb up and down, but 
already there are mutants out to get 
Bob. These mutants are dangerous until 
one of the miner tools is taken, 
whereupon the mutants change colour 
and acquire a friendly appearance — 
they smile for a few seconds! During 
this period they are vulnerable and may 
be touched to destroy them. If they are 
not killed they will return to their 
dangerous state. 

The next two levels are similar. The 
first one consists of sliding down slides 
and the second one involves an 
elevator. 

The next five levels have lilypads, a 
deadly radioactive pool, multiple lifts 
and a hydraulic pump operation. 



In level nine Bob meets the 
Stompers. Contact with these is lethal. 
At level ten Bounty Bob must advance 
to the upper framework by being shot 
out of a cannon! To do this he needs to 
go to the TNT chamber and eat some 
TNT, climb the ladder and then fall into 
the cannon. The cannon can be moved 
to the desired position and then Bob will 
shoot up one level per ton of TNT that 
he has eaten when the fire button is 
pressed. If Bob eats more than three 
tons of TNT at a time the cannon will 
shoot him out at lethal speeds. 

Level 1 1 is the abandoned uranium 
mine where Bob should find the reason 
for going on his adventure — the 
notorious Yukon Yohan. Bob has to 
take the uranium and you collect bonus 
points. 

The game ends when three Bounty 
Bobs are killed. One or two players can 
play and there is the option of sound be- 
ing on or off. These noises include the 
sound of Bob walking and sliding down 
the slides. 

Miner 2049er, in my view, is an 
average arcade game and is similar to 
the more famous Manic Miner. 



SUBROC 

Runs on: Colecovision 
Made by: CBS Electronics 
Price: £29.95 



A fleet of hostile forces has assembled 
around your vessel. You must defend 



Megamania Madness 

We print here a picture of what happens 
to Activision's 'Megamania' game for 
the VCS when you score more than 
999999 points. 

This amazing feat was performed by 
Peter Green — the editor of one of our 
sister magazines 'Computing Today'. 
Pete is one of the hottest video game 
players in our offices — yet he edits a 
'serious' magazine that doesn't touch 
games at all! 





Having made the screen go blank 
and the video game 'hang' completely 
so that it had to be turned off, Pete 
turned his hand to the Atari computer 
version of this game where his current 
score is around 1 28000. We don't yet 
know what happens when you 'clock' 
the computer version, but we would 
like to know. 

If you have a high high-score then 
send in the details signed by a witness, 
and a picture of the screen if possible so 
that we can print it. 
Send your claims to: 

High High-score/Qames Computing 
1 Golden Square 
London W1R3AB 
Best of luck. 




' =?-^S££j 



the sea against wave after wave of 
enemies by directing your gunsight to 
locate them and then shooting them 
with either torpedoes or missiles. 

You should try to eliminate seven 
types of enemy objects. Your torpedoes 
can destroy cruisers and battleships 
that steam across the sea and your 
missiles can eliminate flying saucers, 
but they can shoot missiles and mines 
back at you and so can the cruisers and 
battleships after a while. 

A mystery ship can appear in every 
attack and when you hit it bonus points 
are awarded. 

Green fighters will appear next. They 
fly at your Subroc vessel in close forma- 
tion and will fire missiles at you. You 
have to destroy them all before the next 
attack. 

Interceptors fill the sky. You must 
fire at these for 200 points each. 
Drones weave across the sea as they 
fire torpedoes, missiles and mines at 
your vessel. You must hit them with a 
torpedo to knock them out of action. 

Once the sea clears the Command 
Plane will swoop in from above. The 
bonus value will start to decrease. If 
you destroy the Command Plane before 
the bonus value reaches zero, you will 
win the points in the Mystery Bonus In- 
dicator. This plane fires missiles and 
hides behind a moving shield. If you hit 
the centre of the shield it vanishes for a 
second and you earn 400 points. You 
then have a chance of hitting the Com- 
mand Plane. 

Your final opponent is the Command 
Ship. Your vessel's weapons have to 
penetrate the ship's force field to 
eliminate this fleet leader. 

In even numbered rounds of this 
game you start battling during the day. 
When the sky turns from blue to orange 
your vessel is in twilight and then, when 
the sky is black, it is night time. 

With this game, as you can see, 
there is plenty of action going on. There 
is the unusual combination of space 
ships and ships such as tankers on the 
screen in one game! 

If you like unusual games Subrock 
should be added to your collection. 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



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Please supply Tape/Disk (delete as necessary) 

I enclose a cheque/PO* fort 

Charge my Access 



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> a of this planet world) 

Alligata Software Ltd 
1 Orange Street, Sheffield S1 4DW Tel: (0742) 755796 

Despatch is normally made on receipt of order and should reach you within 7 days 
Send for full colour brochure (enclose a stamp) 



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OTHER GREAT MIND GAMES: 




Starring The Overlords 
of the Universe 
The candidate (you) 
have to get to the 
Chamber of Creation. 
It's a laugh a minute, 
since it's 2,000 light 
years away on the most 
horrible planet in the 
Universe ... and your 
starship doesn't work 
eitherl 




A full feature adventure 
starring well known 
nasty aliens the Zarps. 
Can you play the hero 
and stop their plans to 
blow up the earth. 




Argus Press 
Software Group 




RULE 
BOOK 



FOR THE 

SPECTRUM 48K, 

CBM 64 



Starring The Zurgs 
After a desperate space 
battle only one fleet of 
heroes remain to 
prevent the invasion of 
earth. The future of 
humanity lies with yoi 



For mail order, write with cheque/RO./card No. to: 

Mind Games, Argus Press Software Group, No. I Golden Square, London Wl A 3/ 







Also a 

Disk at £9.95 



r <- 



Aggro at closing time at the local. Getaway car 
screeches to a halt outside a bank. Ingenious 
methods employed by the Mafia to literally 
spirit away the lootfrom the High Street. Never 
fear - P.C. Fuzz is on patrol. 
COMMODORE 64 £7.95 



t- 



TRADE ENQUIRIES ANIROG SOFTWARE LTD. 29 WEST HILL DARTFORD KENT (0322)92513/8 

MAIL ORDER. 8 HIGH STREET HORLEY SURREY 24 HOUR CREDIT. CARD SALES HORLEY (02934) 6083 
PAYMENT BY CHEQUE P.O. ACCESS/VISA 50p POSTAGE & PACKAGING 







Interrupting all games programmers 
..." Send us your Games 









o<« 



FRANTIC FINGERS BOUNCING BERTY/ ESKIMO CAPERS 

A games control utility for the B. B.C. Micro Introducing our special high class budget 

series (or 16/48K Spectrum 



Cat Walk, Billy Bluebottle, Bouncing Berty, Eskimo Capers. Incorporate English, French, & German instructions. <f ^ n.n„= -snw 

UGiivsry oU 03ys 



wjpys/M 






v^ 



<?y 



<> 



,# 



~ Y* . ■ Reg. in England No. 1 3701 77 



• 



SOFTWARE 




CLASSIC RACING 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



Oric 1/Atmos 

Salamander 

£7.95 



This horse racing simulation enables up 
to six people to play at once so it can 
be, and is, a very good game for all the 
family. If less than six people play then 
the computer controls the remaining 
places — and tough opposition it makes 
too. 

After entering your name you are 
presented with a choice of 4 to 16 
meetings. To play the game properly 
you should play sixteen meetings so 
that you have plenty of time to find out 
what ground and distance each horse 
prefers. The race programme shows all 
the meetings in a season and what 
distances each race is over — there are 
six races to each season. Each player 
then selects a horse for each race from 
their stable of sixteen horses and then 
the betting takes place. The odds and 
weight are shown on the screen, the 
heavier the horse the better it will go. 
When all betting is finished the graphic 
capabilities of the Oric take over. 

The course is set out, the green track 
enclosed by the rails and the starting 
line is in the middle of the screen. The 
horse (plus jockeys) walk to the line and 
then they are away. Realistic galloping 
sounds complement the graphics as the 
screen scrolls from right to left. As the 
horses battle for positions the furlong 
posts come and go and soon the race is 



over. The computer works out all the 
betting and the stake money is divided 
between the first three places. By 
entering the same horse in different 
races you are able to plan your 
favourites for the eight classics at the 
end of the season. 

A save game feature is a very helpful 
addition to this truly excellent and ad- 
dictive simulation game — a must for 
Oric owners — Get It! 



and go to the fast speed by pressing the 
space bar. You lose a life if a lepton hits 
you or the line behind your craft before 
the area is filled in. 

A good strategy is to build narrow 
blocks in the centre of the screen using 
the fast speed until there is only a small 
gap near the top of the screen. Then to 
join these blocks to the top of the 
screen using the slow speed when the 
lepton is in the smaller half. This tactic 
only works if there are few leptons 
otherwise try to split it into three before 
trying the same tactics. This is a very 
enjoyable game that is very addictive 
and easy to play. 




Runs on: BBC 

Made by: Micro Power 

Price: £7.95 

In this great game you have to trap the 
darting 'leptons' using your robot craft. 
You do this by leaving a trail behind 
your craft and when you reach the edge 
of a filled in area the smaller of the areas 
is filled in. 

The lepton is destroyed either by get- 
ting caught in the area that is filled in, or 
when 95% of the screen is filled in. The 
amount of area that is tilled in is shown 
by a line at the bottom of the screen 
that disappears as you fill in the areas. 

You have the option of two speeds 
for your robot craft. The slow speed fills 
in an area red, and the fast speed fills in 
areas pink. You start on the slow speed 



HEIST 

Runs on: BBC 
Made by: Soft Spot 
Price: £6.95 

You are a bank manager and it is the 
close of a very busy day so you have to 
go to different parts of the bank and 
return the money that you find there to 
the safe. Sounds simple, it would be but 
there are four burglars who also want 
the money and they are determined to 




GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



57 



SOFTWARE 



catch you so that they can make off 
with it unhindered. 

There are two hammers in corners of 
the bank and with these you can knock 
out the burglars, but you can't move up 
or down the ladders that connect the 
different parts of the bank. You get 
bonus points if you drink the cup of tea 
that appears at random for a short time 
somewhere in the bank. 

The burglars also leave bombs 
around the bank that, if you don't 
defuse them, blow up killing you. When 
you get all the money to the vault in the 
bottom of the bank, business starts for 
the second day and this time the 
burglars are more determined, there is 
more money to collect, and more 
bombs to defuse. 

I like the way your initials are put into 
the hi-score table using the cursor keys 
like in the arcades. There is also a freeze 
option, useful for answering the phone, 
making coffee, going to the toilet, etc. 
This is an enjoyable combination of 
both Donkey Kong and Space Panic 
with an element of its own. 




MICIIONAl 



CUTHBERT IN SPACE 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



Commodore 6 4 

Microdeal 

£8.00 



Basically, the game resembles that of 
Ultimate's Jetpack but with added 
features to make full use of the Com- 
modore's facilities. 

The scenario is set with the player 
(using either the keyboard or a joystick) 
having the task of controlling a remote 



shuttle to firstly pick up fuel pods 
(which are lying on the different levels 
of the planet's surface) and return 
them, one at a time, to the mothership 
located at the base of the screen. 
Whilst keeping an eye on directing the 
shuttle to collect the fuel pods and 
return to the mothership, it would be 
useful if the other eye (at the same 
time) could be used to avoid the 
horizontally flying objects otherwise 
known as the Intergalactic Police Force. 

Once having collected all of the fuel 
pods and returned each to the mother- 
ship, the player is then transported to 
another planet with an increased 
number of fuel pods and flying objects 
whose movements become increasing- 
ly erratic. 

As an option, to gain additional 
points the player having collected the 
last fuel pod and before returning to the 
mothership to transport, can hang 
around to collect the falling treasures 
before they hit the ground, whilst still 
avoiding the IPF, returning only when 
totally satisfied with the loot, to beam 
into another screen. 

Occasionally, whilst transporting 
between planets, the mothership 
develops a malfunction and requires 
maintenance. This is accomplished by 
having to send out the shuttle to the 
location of the nearest supply parts. 
The player is given the coordinates of 
the mothership's location, the shuttle's 
present position and that of the parts 
depot. The joystick or keyboard can 
then be used to change the coordinates 
of the shuttle's position to match that 
of the parts depot and then back to that 
of the mothership, within the specified 
time limit. 

There is a pause feature with 12 
levels of play of which 1 -8 is user selec- 
table. 



ARENA 3000 

Runs on: Commodore 64 
Made by: Microdeal 
Price: £8.00 

The theme of this game is set in the 
year 3000, where a lone cyborg 
(human/machine hybrid) begins in the 
centre of a large enclosure surrounded 
by hostile enemies. The task is to 
destroy the creatures within the 
enclosure (using an arm pistol) as the 
enemies approach from all directions. 

Once having cleared a wave of 
dangerous robots, yet another appears 
but with opponents that move faster, 
require more hits to be destroyed and 
mutate, upon being hit into other forms 
of robots. Each form having a set pat- 
tern of movement. 

The game begins with the player 
having 3 cyborgs at his/her disposal and 
an additional one for every set of 
20,000 points scored. 

Each screen has a certain number of 
enemies of which there are 8 different 
forms. The opponents, on a screen, can 




%l$$lWl&&llw«*Ma<&& 



|«§!@©iAt 



be all of the same form or several dif- 
ferent forms. 

The game requires the use of one or 
two joysticks. If one joystick is used the 
cyborg's movement and firing is con- 
trolled by the directional movement of 
the joystick. 

If two joysticks are used, then one 
joystick can be used to control the 
movement of the cyborg and the other 
can be used by a second player to fire in 
any direction regardless of the 
movements made by the first joystick. 
This proved to be very useful in tight 
situations to achieve enormous scores 
but requires the aid of a second player. 
As a matter of interest a score of over 
2.5 million was reached with about 30 
cyborg's remaining after around 1 50 
screens/arenas (after the 99th screen 
the arena numbers are reset to Zero) 
when the phone rang and I frantically 
grabbed the instructions, searching for 
the key to pause the game but found 
none. 

So, by this some indication can be 
given as to the addictiveness of the 
game. 



THE FOREST 

Runs on: Spectrum 48 K 
Made by: Phipps Associates 
Price: £9.95 

The Forest is a computer simulation of 
the sport of orienteering. The user of 
the program becomes the competitor 
and is able to tackle all the navigational 
problems encountered by orienteers 
without the necessity for physical 



58 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



fitness. With the tape, you are supplied 
with a detailed map of preset routes 
marked out with the course you must 
take. To participate in the game you will 
need to have a ruler graduated in 
millimetres and a geometry protractor 
for measuring angles. 

A book is provided with the tape 
which explains the principles of 
orienteering and also how to use all the 
commands and the cursor keys to move 
you along. It is essential to study the 
book carefully before commencing the 
race or you will waste valuable time 
looking up commands. 

You can quit the game at any time 
and there is incorporated a facility for 
cheating to get you out of tight spots, 
but if the latter is used then this will be 
reported and held against your score at 
the finish. 

As well as the two courses provided, 
there is an option which allows you to 
plan your own course and save it on 
tape and an extra map is available 
separately. 

As you travel along your route, what 
you will see normally on the screen is 
what you would be seeing if actually 
orienteering out in the open, for in- 
stance trees, houses and other land 
features. 

When you have mastered the art of 
map reading and operating the controls, 
'The Forest' provides a very accurate 
representation of the difficulties en- 
countered in orienteering, and would 
provide valuable experience for anyone 
wishing to take up the sport. It can also 
be a lot of fun for those who already 
participate and have previous ex- 
perience in orienteering. 



CUTHBERT IN THE 
JUNGLE 

Runs on: Commodore 6 4 
Made by: Microdeal 
Price: £8.00 

The star of the game features Cuthbert, 
whose adventurous nature has led him 
to a jungle filled with perilous perils. 

The player controls Cuthbert via the 
keyboard or a joystick, and has the task 
of guiding him through the jungle, 
whilst avoiding the many hazards in 
order to collect the treasures strewn 
along the path. 

There are 1 20 screens of which, no 
two screens are claimed to be the 
same. The hazards in this game include 
crocodiles, scorpions, fires, snakes and 
tar pits. Collision with any of these 
dangers would lead to the loss of a life. 
Then there are the rolling logs and holes 
in the ground. These are not as fatalistic 
as the previous set of hazards but either 
collision with the logs or falling down a 
hole leads to a loss of points rather than 
the loss of a life. So, instead of falling 
through the hole to reach the subterra- 
nean level, the ladder could be used, as 







«L_^l 













in certain parts of the underground 
passage could be used to bypass the 
overhead dangers. 

The game begins by giving the player 
1 2 minutes and three lives to collect as 
many of the treasures inside the time 
limit, through the pause facility allows 
the player to take a breather from time 
to time. 

Overall, I found this game to have a 
great addictive appeal, in that there are 
a number of obstacles that need to be 
overcome in a specific manner, before 
the treasures can be obtained. 



DANGER RANGER 

Runs on: Commodore 64 
Made by: Microdeal 
Price: £8.00 

In this game the player controls the 
Ranger with the aid of either the 
keyboard or Joystick — personally I 
found that the keyboard gave a greater 
degree of control in the manoeuvres 
that were to follow. The basic object of 
the game is to traverse through the 2 
different screens, which are then 
repeated but at an increased level of dif- 
ficulty in terms of the ferocity of the at- 
tacking dangers namely — floating 
urns, radioactive bats and roving eyes 
(on the first screen) and the drop of acid 
rain accompanied by the stationary 
monsters found on the second screen. 
The object of the game is to collect 
the 1 keys situated openly on the 5 
platforms of the first screen. Each plat- 
form having 2 keys with 1 or 2 spaces 
for the Ranger to fall through to reach 
the platform below. The Ranger can 



| jump over these spaces to reach the key 
I on the opposite side of the platform. As 
!well as being able to jump the Ranger 
can also duck down to avoid the bullets, 
floating bats and the roving eyes. At the 
centre of the fifth platform at the base 
of the screen is a spring that can be us- 
ed to propel the Ranger back up to the 
first platform in order to collect any re- 
maining keys. 

Having collected the tenth key the 
Ranger then has to face the acid 
chamber to collect all of the treasure 
chests (located on the right hand side of 
the screen), whilst avoiding not only the 
drops of acid rain, but also the 4 
demons which have to be shot. 

There are 5 levels of skill, a hi-scare 
tabe and a pause facility that allows one 
to ponder the oncoming doom. There is 
also a practice mode in which the 
Ranger can duck, dodge and shot to kill 
without being killed. 

Overall, I found this to be a very dif- 
ficult game and found myself increas- 
ingly attracted to the practice mode 
where my score seemed to be more 
reasonable. 



THE ULTIMATE 
CROSSWORD 

Runs on: BBC 32k 
Made by: The Alien 
Price: £6.95 

This is as the title suggests 'The 
ultimate crossword' — it is three dimen- 
sional. Instead of just one 15x15 
square to think over, it is a 1 5 x 1 5 x 1 5 
cube of 30 crosswords with interlinked 
clues. This means that words now have 
to fit three ways not just two. 

Each crossword is identified as either 
a front or a side followed by which one 
it is (A-R). The clues are arranged on the 
computer by a co-ordinate system the 
letter followed by the number. This is 
slightly annoying as in the book of clues 
supplied they are referred to as a 
number followed by the letter. 

The puzzle itself if stored as data on 
tape and can be saved and reloaded for 
later use, this means that you don't 
have to keep typing in the clues that 
you have solved. The main program is in 
BASIC this means it is fairly easy to 
convert it for use on disc. Included 
within the program is an anagram 
solver, this might have some use for the 
dedicated crossword fanatic but I 
couldn't find one. 

I am not the crossword sort of per- 
son, but I found it very enjoyable and 
easy to use, I even solved two clues 
(wow) side A 7H across is 'arc' and 
front B 1J down is 'orange'. That's 
what I made them and they fit, so 
please don't tell me they are wrong. 

P.S. Can anyone tell me what "A 
wise plant?" is in four letters? 




GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



59 



SOFTWARE 




BUFFER ADVENTURE 

Runs on: Spectrum 48k 
Made by: Buffer Micro 
Price: £5.95 

Buffer adventure is an adventure set in- 
side the Buffer Micro shop. Inside you 
must discover the idiosyncrasies of the 
weird and wonderful characters who 
work in the shop. To complete the 
adventure you must enter the shop and 
search its many rooms and passages to- 
find your credit card and buy the goods 
in the shop. When you have paid for 
your goods you will be permitted to 
leave. 

Every correct action you perform will 
increase your score but beware of mak- 
ing mistakes for one wrong move could 
leave you trapped forever, never to see 
the light of day again. Also you must be 
careful not to annoy the employees of 
the Buffer shop, for one step too far and 
you could be dead. 

Draw a map as you go to help you 
remember your position and watch out 
for sarcastic comments from your com- 
puter. In this shop your spectrum takes 
full command and will stand for no 
nonsense. 

Keep an eye out for clues scattered 
around which may lead you to find what 
you're looking for. If you do make a 



fatal mistake then you can always start 
again, and the knowledge that you have 
previously acquired will assist you fur- 
ther the next time you play. 

An exciting adventure requiring 
much thought and a talent for solving 
new challenges. The only problem I en- 
countered was communication. The 
vocabulary was rather limited and it 
was difficult finding words that the 
computer could understand. A lot of fun 
however. Well worth buying. 




DEMON KNIGHT 

Runs on: Spectrum 
Made by: ASP Software 
Price: £6,99 

Demon Knight is described as an adven- 
ture game which is difficult deadly and 
logical. You aim to root out and destroy 
the Demon Beelzebub. Beelzebub will 
not appreciate it if you attack him with 
weapons or try to kill him in this way, so 
to help you you must enlist the powers 
of magic. Before you even get the 
pleasure of meeting Beelzebub 
however, you must solve all the puzzles 
on the route to find him. This could take 
quite a time. 

Demon Knight is a text adventure 
and one which I find to be rather slow. 



All commands, with the exception of 
Help, Quit an Inventory, must be 
entered as two word commands so that 
the computer can interpret them cor- 
rectly. This also means that directional 
commands must be entered as two 
word commands such as, GO WEST or 
GO NORTH. This is extremely time con- 
suming and there is a pause of quite a 
few seconds each time the computer 
responds or replys. 

Instructions provided are adequate 
and the help command often gives 
some useful hints. Clues are also includ- 
ed in the description of each surroun- 
ding so if you look carefully you should 
be able to evaluate your next move. 

Very much a typical adventure game 
but with a difference in the usual story 
line. In Demon Knight you have the op- 
portunity to rescue a beautiful maiden 
in distress, from the evil clutches of the 
demon Beelzebub, and them marry to 
live happily ever after. A wonderful 
fairytale ending, if you ever get that far. 

INVASION 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



ZX Spectrum 48 K 

ASP 

£6.99 



This is no arcade game but one of 
strategy where you are in charge of the 
Western Alliance land forces, just prior 
to an invasion by red tanks. You must 
exercise skill and judgement as you 
move, supply and build up your limited 
defences to stand any hope of victory. 
The screen is set up into three parts: the 
map, army numbers (morale and the 
number of units) and the message area. 

The game begins with complex in- 
structions and then draws the screen. 
The map consists of a grid with letters 
and numbers at the top and sides. Next 
you are asked for orders. Here you must 
input the number of the army (shown as 
a tank with a number on it) and then 
given choices of increasing your 
strength, reducing it or moving. To 
move cursor keys are used. Once you 
are satisfied with strength/moves you 
exit from ordering mode and are asked if 
you want to attack. If you choose to do 
this you must input the location, army 
number and the number of units to be 
used. Now a battle report will be given. 
This features the number of units lost 
on both sides. Now you are asked if you 
wish to abort the game. If you press 
"y" then the score is printed. 

The graphics are only U.D.G.'s but 
reasonable considering the game is in 
BASIC and the sound is adequate. 
Recommend for a strategy fanatic. 




60 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 




1-2 Players. Running on 
Commodore 64, Sinclair Spectrum 
from your usual software store. 



You are commanding a squadron of four 
ground attack aircraft . . . 

The mission is seemingly hopeless. 

Fly along the river at zero altitude, twisting and 
turning crazily to stay within its tortuous banks, 
blasting at anything and everything in sight. Especially 
the bridges. 

Three of your jets are held in reserve while you 
are pitched against Battleships, Enemy Aircraft, Land 
Tanks, Balloons, Helicopter Gunships. All intent only on 
your destruction. 

And destroy you they will, if you don't get them 
first. You'll need to keep an eye on your fuel gauge. 
But take comfort, you can take fuel on board from 
one of the special depots. 



If you get hit- and nobody has yet reached the 
end of the river- your next reserve starts at the last 
bridge you blasted on your way through! 

Each target you destroy adds to your points 
score. 

Like all Activision Software, River Raid will hold 
you and keep you coming back for more. 

Chocks away! 

Lose yourself in the world of 

ZAcWisioN 



T he program eontai 
f the controls needed, and also 3 - 
xplanation of what the player has 
do, although I expect everyone knows 
how to play "Space Invaders-'. 

There are five levels of difficulty, of 
which level 1 is the easiest, antMiai 
every time you clear a sere* 
up to the next level- I here 

name into 




RUNdown 



80-120 



150-360 
PROCdecide 

PROChit 

PROCfire 

PROCplay 

810-940 



950-1040 



PROCmc 
1320-1640 

1670-1990 

PROCcheck 



PROCfin 



PROCend 



PROCdown 



PROCsetd 



PROCdropb 



Action 

sets the mode and the 

sound envelopes. 

traps and reports any 

errors the reader may 

have made. 

gets rid of the flashing 

cursor. 

sets up the top ten 

scores and names. 

calls the procedure to 

assemble the machine 

code. 

sets up the variables. 

works out which alien 

has been hit. 

checks if your rocket 

has hit an invader. 

moves the rocket. 

moves the base and 

calls any relevant 

procedure. 

calls up the machi 

code to move the 

invaders left or right. 

assembler routine. 

moves any "V" on the 

screen to the right. 

moves any "V" on the 

screen to the left. 

checks how far the 

invaders can move 

before they change 

direction. 

This starts the program 

again. 

reduces the players 

lives by one and checks 

to see you have some 

left. 

moves the invaders 

down the screen. 

works out which is the 

lowest invader in a 

column, so that it can 

drop a bomb, without 

hitting the ones below 

it. 

moves the "•# " bomb 

down and checks if it 

has hit the base. 



PROCd 

PROCtitle 
(W$,E%) 

PROCIntro 
PROChi 

PROCask 

PROCIives 




This is a useful routine 
to use at the end of a 
page of introduction, 
prints in the middle of 
the screen on line E%, 
in a random colour, in 
double height, W$ , 
Prints up the 
introduction. 
Prints and places any 
new name in the top 
ten score board. 
Asks if the player wants 
another game and acts 
on the response. 
Prints up the number of 
bases the player has left 
at the bottom of the 




Permanent score record. 

Number of lives left. 
i; Present level of play. 
I Speed of aliens. 

8f*& & Y% co-ordinates of the 

base. 
X6% & YB% co-ordinates of the 

rocket. 
D% Direction of the invaders 

(left or right). 
SQN% Pitch of the background 

sound. 
SC% present score. 

PF% & FL% Flags for the rocket and 



SON% 



the bomb. 

Position along of the 

invaders. 
LB% & RB% How far the invaders 

can travel to the left 

and right of the screen. 
LC% & RC% Furthest column of 

invaders to the left and 

right. 
BC% Which invader row is 

tne bottom row. 
BB% Which line the invaders 

have to reach before 

they have landed. 
DX% & DY% Co-ordinates of the 

"# " bomb, 




at line ";ERL;:RE 



10 M0DE7 

20 ENVELOPE 1,2,1,-2,1,10,10,10,126,0,0,0,30,50 
30 ENVELOPE 2,2,12,-24,12,20,60,20,126,0,0,0,100,100 
40 ENVELOPE 3,1,150,200,100,20,20,45,126,0,0,-1,100, 
100 

50 ON ERROR A7.=ERL: REPORT: PRINT 
PEAT: A-INKEY(O)! UNTIL A=-1:END 
60 VDU 23|8202;0;0;0; 
70 DIM N*<10) ,SCX(10> 
80 FOR QX-1 TO 10 
90 N*(QX)=CHR*(RND(6)+128)+"James Mcpherson" 

100 SCX(QX) = (11-Qy.)*150 

110 NEXT 

120 DIM SX(B,5) 

130 PROCIntro 

140 PROCmc 

150 CX=0:LX=3 

160 IF AX>5 THEN AX=5 

170 TIM=(6-AX>*30 

180 XX=19:YX=20 

190 DX=l:XBX=XX+2 

200 YBX=YX 

210 S0NX=40 

220 FOR QX=1 TO 8 

230 FOR W/.= l TO 5 

240 SX(QX,wX>=0 

250 NEXT md 

260 NEXT 

270 SCX=CX 

280 FLX=0:PLX=3 

290 CLS 

300 LBX=3:RBX=6 

310 LCX=1:RCX=B 

320 BCX«5:BBX=11 

330 DX7.=0:DY=0 

340 DFX=0:STIM=TIM/39 

350 C1*="V" 

360 C2*="V" 

370 PROCsetup 

380 PROCplay 

390 END 

400 1 

410 : 

420 DEF PROCdacide 

430 PRINT TAB<NXBX-1,YBX>< " " 

440 SOUND 1,-15,200,2 

450 FLX-0 

460 XNX«(XBX-PLX)/4+l 

470 YNX-<YBy.-SPLX-3)/2+l 

460 8y.(XNX,YNX>»l 

490 XBX-XXiYBX-YX 

500 SCX-BCX+10 

310 PRINT TAB(15,0);SCX; 

520 TIM-TIM-STIM 

530 IF TIM=30.5 THEN TIM=1 

540 S0NX=S0NX+3 

550 SOUND 2,1,S0N'/.,1 

560 IF (SCX MOD 400) =0 THEN CX=SCX: AX=AX+1 i SOTO 170 

570 ENDPROC 

580 : 

590 : 

600 DEF PROChit 

610 NXBX=0 

620 QX=0 

630 PRINT TAB(XBX,YBX);CHR*255 

640 IF YBX<3 THEN PRINT TAB<XBX,YBX) : FLX=0 

650 IF EX=86 THEN NXBX=XBX 

660 IF NXBXOO THEN PROCdecide 

670 ENDPROC 

680 : 

690 : 

700 DEF PROCfire 

710 PRINT TAB(XBX,YBX)s" " 

720 YB1=YB1+1 

730 IF YB1>0.9 THEN YBX=YBX-1: YB1=0 

740 EX«=?(HIMEM+YBX*40+XBX) 

750 PRINT TAB(XBX,YBX>;CHR*255 

760 IF EX<>32 AND EXO150 THEN PROChit 

770 IF YBX<3 THEN PRINT TAB (XBX, YBX> ; " " : FLX=0 

780 ENDPROC 

790 : 

800 : 



810 

820 

830 

840 

850 

860 

870 

880 

890 

900 

910 

920 

930 

940 

950 

960 

970 

980 

990 

1000 

1010 

1020 

1030 

1040 

1050 

1060 

1070 

1080 

1090 

1100 

1110 



DEF PROCplay 

PROClives 

SOUND 2,1,40,1 

PRINT TAB(0,YX);CHR*149 

TIME=0 

REPEAT 

IF DFX=0 THEN PROCsetd 

PRINT TAB (XX-3,YX); " 

XX=XX+INKEY (-98) -INKEY (-67) + < XX>36> - ( XX<4) 

IF INKEY (-74) AND FLX=0 THEN XBX=XX: YBX=YX: FLX=1 

PRINT TAB(XX-2,YX> ;CHR*149; "x/t" 

PROCdropb 

IF FLX=1 THEN PROCfire 

UNTIL TIME>TIM 

IF PLX<LBX THEN PROCdown 

IF PLX>RBX THEN DX=0: PROCcheck 

IF DX=0 THEN CALL&DOO: PLX=PLX-1 

IF DX=1 THEN CALLS<D80:PLX=PLX+1 

IF FLX=0 THEN 1030 

EX=? (HIMEM+YBX»40+XBX) 

PRINT TAB(XBX,YBX);CHR#255 

IF EX=86 THEN PROChit 

GOTO 850 

ENDPROC 



DEF PROCsetup 

SPLX=0 

FOR TYX=3 TO 15 

PRINT TAB (0, TYX) ; CHR* ( 128+RND (7) ) 

NEXT 




1120 
1130 
1140 
1150 
1160 
1170 
1180 
1190 
1200 
1210 
1220 
1230 
1240 
1250 
1260 
1270 
1280 
1290 
1300 
1310 
1320 
1330 
1340 
1350 
1360 



FOR TYX=3 TO 12 STEP 2 

FOR QX=3 TO 29 STEP 8 

PRINT TAB (QX, TYX); CI* 

PRINT TAB (QX+4 , TYX) ; C2* 

NEXT 

NEXT 

PRINT TAB(8,0) ; CHR*129; "Scare-" ; CX 

PRINT TAB(23,0) ;CHR*132; "Hi -score-" ; SCX ( 1 ) 

PRINT TAB (0,1); CHR*146; STRING* (39, " , " ) 

PRINT TAB (0 , 22) ; CHR*145; STRING* (39, " , " ) ; 

ENDPROC 



REM**» Type in the -following »** 
REM*** assembly language very *** 
REM*** carefully. As one error *** 
REM*** could destroy the whole *** 
REM*** program. *** 



DEF PROCmc 

FOR ZX=0 TO 2 STEP 2 

PX=S<D00 

COPT ZX 

.BIGLOOP LDA #&7F 



64 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



1370 


STA 


&71 


1380 


LDA 


#110 


1390 


STA 


&70 


1400 


LDX 


#0 


1410 


.LI 


INX 


1420 


L DY 


#3 


1430 


.L2 


LDA 14,7 


1440 


CMP 


#86 


1450 


BNE 


JUMP 


1460 


DEY 




1470 


STA 


(4,70) ,Y 


1480 


I NY 




1490 


LDA#32 


1500 


STA(&70) ,Y 


1510 


.JUMP INY 


1520 


CPY 


#42 


1 530 


BNE 


L2 


1540 


LDA 


&70 


1550 


SEC 




1560 


SBC 


#40 


1570 


STA 


$..70 


1580 


LDA 


&71 


1590 


SBC 


#0 


1600 


STA 


8<71 


1610 


CPX 


#22 


1620 


BNE 


LI 


1630 


RTS: 


l] 


1640 


NEXT 


1650 






1660 






1670 


FOR 


ZX=-0 TO 


1680 


P%=&D8Q 


1690 


COPT Z7. 


1700 


LDA 


*&7F 


1710 


STA 


8<71 


1720 


LDA 


#110 


1 730 


STA 


&70 


1740 


LDX 


#0 




STEP 



1930 
1940 
1950 
1960 
1970 
1980 
1990 
2000 
2010 
2020 
2030 
2040 
2050 
2060 
2070 
2080 
2090 
2100 
2110 
2120 
2130 
2140 
2150 
2160 
2130 
2170 
2180 
2190 
2200 
2210 
2220 
2230 
2240 
2250 
2260 
2270 



SBC #0 
STA &7 1 
CPX #22 
BNE SL1 
RTS: ] 
NEXT 
ENDPRDC 






DEF PROCcheck 

CHE 1 7.=0 

CHE27.=0 

FOR ER7.= 1 TO 5 

IF S7.(LC7.,ER-/.)=0 THEN CHE17.=CHE17.+ 1 

IF S7. (RC'/.,ER7.)=0 THEN CHE27.=CHE27.+ 1 

NEXT 

IF CHE17.=0 THEN LB7.=LB7.-4 

IF CHE27.=0 THEN RB7.=RB7.+4: RC7.=RC7. 

IF CHE 17.= 100 THEN 2030 

CHE17.=0 

FOR ER"/.= 1 TO 8 

IF B5C (ER7.,BC7.)=0 THEN CHE17.=CHE17.+1 

NEXT 

IF CHE17.=0 THEN BC7.=BC7.-1 : BB7.=8B7.-2: CHE 17. 



» 



<& 



: LC7.=LC7.+ 1 : CHE 1 7.-- 
-1:CHE17.= 



100 
100 



IF BB7.+SPL7.M8 THEN PROCend 
ENDPROC 



DEF PROCfin 
♦FX15.0 
PROChi 
GOTO 150 
ENDPROC 









1750 .SL1 INX 1 

1760 LDY #42 

1770 .SL2 LDA <8<70> , 

1780 CMP #86 

1790 BNE J 2 

1800 INY 

1810 STA (&70) ,Y 

1820 DEY 

1830 LDA#32 

1840 STA(«<70) ,Y 

1850 .J2 DLY 

1860 CPY #3 

1870 BNE SL2 

1880 LDA !<70 

1890 SEC 

1900 SBC #40 

1910 STA &70 

1920 LDA 8<71 



2280 DEF PROCend 

2290 SOUND 3,3,0, 1 

2300 FOR W7.= l TO 1500 

2310 NEXT 

2320 PRINT rABiXB7.,YB7.) ; " "; 

2330 L7.=L7.-1 

2340 PROClives 

2350 IF L7.=0 THEN PROC-fin 

2360 DF7.=0:FL7.=0 

2370 ENDPROC 

2380 : 

2390 : 

2400 DEF PROCdown 

2410 PROCcheck 

2420 DV.= 1 

2430 PRINT TAB<XB7.,YB7.> ; " " 

2440 SPL7.=SPL7.+ 1 

2450 VDU 28,2,20,39,3 

2460 VDU 30, 11 

2470 VDU 26 

2480 ENDPROC 

2490 : 

2500 ! 

2510 DEF PROCsetd 

2520 XN7.= <ABS< (X7.-PL7.) /4) MOD 8J+1 

2530 FDR Q"/.=5 TO 1 STEP -1 

2540 IF S7. <XN7.,Q7.)=0 THEN DY= i Q7.- I ) *2+4+SPL7.: DX7.= < XN7.- 
1 ) *4 + PL7.: DF7.= 1 : Q7.= l 

2550 NEXT 

2560 IF DF'/.-O THEN XN7.= (XN7. NOD 8)+l!l30TO 2530 

2570 PRINT TAB(DX7.,DY-1> ; "V": 

25S0 ENDPROC 

2590 : 

2600 : 

2610 DEF PROCdroph 

2620 PRINT TAB(DX7.,DY) ; " " ; 

2630 DY=DY+0.4 

2640 IF INT(DY)=20 AND DXX>XX~2 AND DX7.< X7.+2 THEN PROC 
end 

2650 IF DY>22 THEN DF7.=0:G0T0 2670 

2660 PRINT TAB(DX7.,DY) ; "*": 

2670 ENDPROC 

2680 : 

2690 : 

2700 DEF PROCd 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



65 




2710 PRINT TABC5, 23) i CHR*136;CHR*134i "Press any key to 

conti nue" ; 

2720 *FX15,0 

2730 A=GET 

2740 CLS 

2750 ENDPROC 

2760 : 

2770 : 

2780 DEF PROCtitle (W*,E - /.) 

2790 S7.= (39-LEN <W*) ) /2-2 

2800 FOR Q7.=E7. TO E7.+ 1 

2810 PRINT TAB(S7.,Q7.) ; CHR*141 ; CHR* < 1 28+RND (6) ) ; W* 

2820 NEXT 

2830 PRINT TAB(S7.+ 1 , Q7. ) ; CHR* ( 128+RND (6) ); STRING* <LEN(W 
*) ,"_") 

2840 ENDPROC 

2850 : 

2860 : 

2870 DEF PROCIntro 

2880 PROCtitleC'Alien intruders" ,7) 

2890 PROCtitleC'Written and designed by", 13) 

2900 PROCtitleC "James McPherson" , 17) 

2910 PRDCd 

2920 PROCtitleC "Alien i ntruders" , 1 ) 

2930 PRINT TABC0,5) ;CHR*132; "This is a version o-f the 
popular arcade"; 

2940 PRINT CHR*132; "game SPACE INVADERS'." 

2950 PRINT ' 'CHR*130; "You have to destroy all the alie 
ns," 

2960 PRINT CHRS130; "with your trusty cannon, before th 
ey" 

2970 PRINT CHR*130; "land. Added to this you must avoid 

2980 PRINT CHR*130; "their lethal bombs." 

2990 PRINT ' 'CHR*129; "If you manage to get a high enau 
gh " 

3000 PRINT CHR*129; "score, then you Are placed in the 

3010 PRINT CHR*129; " 'TOP TEN' score-board." 

3020 PRINT ' 'CHR*133; " If you clear the screen you move 

up to" 

3030 PRINT CHR*133;"the next level." 

3040 PROCd 

3050 PROCtitleC'Controls" ,0) 

3060 PROCtitleC "Z Left", 7) 

3070 PROCtitleC "X Right", 10) 



3080 
3090 
3100 
3110 
3120 
3130 
3140 
3150 
3160 
3170 
3180 
3190 
3200 
3210 
3220 
3230 
3240 
3250 
3260 
3270 
3280 
3290 
3300 
3310 
3320 
3330 
3340 
3350 
3360 
CQ7.) 
3370 
3380 
3390 
3400 
3410 
3420 
3430 
3440 
3450 
3460 
3470 
3480 
3490 
3500 
3510 
3520 
3530 
3540 
3550 
3560 
3570 
3580 
3590 
3600 
3610 
3620 
3630 
3640 
3650 
3660 
3670 
3680 



PROCtitleC "RETURN Fire", 13) 

PR0Ctitle(CHR*136+"G00D LUCK ",19) 

PROCd 

PROCtitleC'Which level do you want <1-5>",10) 

PRINT TAB(15,13) ; 

A7.=GET 

07.=A7.-48 

A7.=07. 

IF A7.>5 OR A7.<1 THEN VDU7:G0TO 3110 

CLS 

ENDPROC 



DEF PROChi 

PL7.=0 

IF SC7.< =SC7. ( 1 ) THEN 3400 

SOUND 2,2,50,1 

FOR Q7.= l TO 10 

IF SC7.>SC7. CQ7.) THEN PL7.=Q7.: Q7.= 10 

NEXT 

PROCd 

PROCtitleC "Hi -scores" , 1 ) 

PROCtitle ( "Congratulations" ,7) 

PROCtitleC'You Are in the TOP TEN scores", 10) 

PROCtitle ("Please put in your name", 16) 

PRINT TABC15, 20) ;: INPUT N* 

IF LENCN*)>15 THEN VDU 7: CLS: GOTO 3320 

FOR Q7.=9 TO 1 STEP -1 

IF SC7.>SC7. <Q7.) THEN SC7. (Q7.+ 1 ) =SC7. <Q7.) : N* (Q7.+ 1 > =N* 

NEXT 

N* C PL7. ) =CHR* 1 33+N* 

SC7. (PL7.)=SC7. 

PROCd 

PROCtitle ("Top Ten board", 0) 

FOR Q7.= l TO 10 

PRINT TAB(l,Q7-*2+2) ;QV. 

PRINT TAB(15,Q7.*2+2> ;N*CQ7.) 

PRINT TAB(5,Q7.*2+2) ; SC7. (Q7.) 

NEXT 

PROCd 

PROCask 

ENDPROC 



DEF PROCask 

PROCtitle ("Do you want another game <Y/N>",10) 

PRINT TABU5, 14) ; 

A*=GET* 

IF A*="Y" THEN A7.=07.: ENDPROC 

IF A*<>"N" THEN VDU 7: GOTO 3530 

END 

ENDPROC 



DEF PROC lives 

IF L7.= l THEN PRINT TAB(3,23>;" 

FOR Q7.= l TO L7.-1 

PRINT TAB(Q7.»4,23) ;CHR*149; "x/t"; 

NEXT 

PRINT ;STRING#(35-Q7.*4," ")■ 

ENDPROC 





'; : ENDPROC 



66 



jr 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 






In this issue we have a feature about Acorn's racing car and the man who 
drives it — David Hunt. Acorn are working with David to produce a motor 
racing game by the author of Aviator. We thought it would be a good idea 
to see what other racing games were on the market so here's what Mike 
Roberts found. 





POLE POSITION 

Runs on: Any Atari Home 

Computer 
Made by: Atari 
Price: £29.95 (cartridge) 

This was the first really good racing 
game in the arcades, it was no surprise 
when Atari converted it for use on their 
home computer system. The end pro- 
duct is quite excellent. Very little has 
been lost in the conversion from arcade 
machine to home computer and the 
graphic abilities of the Atari are really 
used to the full. I always knew that the 
Atari was theoretically able to produce 
such displays but I had never seen 
anything like them before. 

There is the option to select between 
four different race tracks of changing 
difficulty. The course of the race track 
itself does not change but the number 
and viciousness of the cars increases. 
One option is a practice lap where there 
are no cars at all. 

Also selectable is the number of laps 
that you want to race from 1 to 8. 

At the beginning of the game you 
have to do a lap of your own and com- 
plete it in a certain time. What time you 
get also determines where on the grid 
you start and how many bonus points 
you get — the top being 4000 points 
and 'pole position'. 

The line up at the start is very 
realistic with two rows of eight cars 
with a starting line and traffic lights in 
full 3-D and perspective. The lights 
count down, the hooter blows, and 
the're off! 

Then comes an exciting race around 
the track. Each lap must be completed 
in a certain time or the game ends. If the 
lap is completed within the time then 
more time is added onto the remaining 
time for the next lap. This is very impor- 
tant as a bonus of 200 points is given at 
the end of the game for each second 
that is left on the clock. 

There is a bug in this though which 
limits the maximum amount of time that 
you can have on the clock. Towards the 
end of the race you can have a large 
amount of time on the clock. The bonus 
at this point can be an extra 60 



seconds, now the time ieft indicator can 
only display two digits so that if you go 
over the line with 40 seconds on the 
clock, the clock resets to 00 that being 
100 with the first digit knocked off. 
When the clock is 00 the game ends 
and you can go no further. The techni- 
que is to go across the line with 39 se- 
cond on the clock so that it goes to 99 
seconds left. 

This is one of the most enjoyable and 
addictive games that I have ever come 
across. I played it for so long that I got 
good enough to win a competition held 
by Atari where the prize was training in 
real racing cars. My top score is 
10B750 - beat that! 



MONACO 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



An added feature is the ambulance. 
This is no friendly Florence Nightingale 
transporter, but an obstacle to avoid as 
it tries to run you into the ground. 

When burning down the road at- 
tempting to slide your way through a 
pack of opposing cars, be prepared to 
watch your speed as there is no brake. 
The car slows itself down quite quickly 
so there shouldn't be any great problem 
with speed — just don't be too flashy. 

This game is good if you just want a 
simple racing game without too much 
complication and you don't want to 
take the Institute of Advanced Motoring 
test just to understand the controls. 

Not as advanced as some but sweet 
and simple. 



BUMPING BUGGIES 



BBC 

Alligata 
£7.95 



Monaco is Alligata's entry into racing 
games for the Beeb. The game has you 
driving down a straight road that stret- 
ches out before you. Controls are z left, 
x right, and return to accelerate. That's 
all you can do. The other cars on the 
road swerve around to try and wreck 
your car. 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



Commodore 64 
Bubble Bus 
£7.95 



Bumping Buggies is a race game with a 
through four seasons of motoring and 
varying weather conditions. Your op- 
ponents on the track are very mean and 
seemingly limitless in numbers. Your 
buggy does have one small (or large) ad- 
vantage over them though — it can fly. 





GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



67 



Yes, your beach buggy can leap into the 
air over obstacles and land perfect con- 
trol. 

Flying through the air has numerous 
advantages. Firstly it is necessary for 
leaping over the rivers that sometimes 
appear in your way. Secondly it gets 
you points, because if you land on an 
opposing buggy it will either explode 
gaining you points or crash gaining you 
more points again. Finally it can get you 
out of the situation where a lot of 
enemy cars are ganging up on you and 
forcing you to crash. 

You can only crash into the verge on 
this game. If you hit any of the other 
cars you just bounce off each other. 
However, in this game the verge twists 
and turns with chicaines and obstacles 
abounding. 

This is a very enjoyable game with 
some good musical effects. Well worth 
getting. 1*r- 

CHEQUERED FLAG 

Runs on: Spectrum 
Made by: Psion 
Price: £6.95 

This is one of the best Spectrum games 
around, it just about comes up to the 
standard of Atarisoft's 'Pole Position'. 
The option screens are fantastic. 
Graphical displays of the four cars that 
you can choose between and the five 
tracks. 

The screen display in the actual 
game is very good. The picture has you 
in the driving seat with all the in- 
struments and the steering wheel visi- 
ble. When you turn a corner the steering 
wheel turns as well. This is in contrast 
to Pole Position where you are floating 
in the air behind the car. 

One thing I don't like is the lack of 
any opposition. The game is purely a 
race against time — there are no com- 
peting cars to get in your way. The fight 
against other cars is what makes a lot 
of lesser racing games fun to play, it's a 
shame that Psion couldn't do it — mind 
you its amazing that they could get this 
much out of the Spectrum it the first 
place. 

The graphics are quite stunning as 
you race around the track and this just 
about makes up for the lack of enemy 
cars. If you want a Spectrum racing 
game then take a look at Pole Position 
and Chequered Flag, both are slightly 
different and which is best is purely per- 
sonal choice — they are both excellent 
games. 




POLE POSITION 

Runs on: C64, Spectrum, BBC B 
Made by: Atarisoft 
Price: £9.95 - £19.95 

(C64 cartridge) 

Atari has to produce games for other 
machines eventually. The market out 
there is just too big to ignore. The huge 
success of Pole Position on the Atari 
home computers was the cue to launch 
it on a range of other machines. 

Probably the best looking version is 
the one on the Spectrum. Not because 
it is anything like the real Pole Position 
but because the programmer has kept 
the display within the restrictions caus- 
ed by the Spectrum and not tried to do 
anything flashy. 

The BBC version is a bit odd when 
cornering. On the Atari a standard 
technique to get around the corners is 
to skid. Skidding will reduce your speed 
to managable levels and point you in the 
right direction. Pole Position on the BBC 
uses MODE 2, this screen uses up 20K 
of memory. Scrolling the screen normal- 
ly on a beeb is quite easy because the 
hardware does it for you, but if you 
want to selectivly move 20K chunks of 
memory around it gets a bit jerky. In 
fact at one point the car stopped dead 



and the road lept half a car width to the 
right — it looked a bit odd. Despite this, 
if you play it 'properly' and use the 
brake (I never do) it can be quite realistic 
and enjoyable. Definitley the best racing 
game for the Beeb on the market. 

The Commodore 64 version is the 
best of the three mentioned here due to 
the colour range. The Atari and the 
CBM64 have a much wider range of 
colours than the Beeb and the Spectrum 
which only have eight. The addition of 
browns and a grey scale really make a 
difference. Extensive use is made of the 
Commodore's graphics ability although 
it could have been better. The sound. 
However, is quite bad. The C64 has the 
biggest and best sound chip in any 
home computer, it isn't being used 
much at all — which is a shame as it 
could be made a lot better. If Turbo 64 
ever gets off the ground then there 
could be a real battle on between the 
two, but at the moment this is still the 
best racing game for the 64. 

Overall there is very little on the 
market that comes anywhere near 
these games in terms of excitement or 
realism. Compared to the original Atari 
computer version they look weak but on 
their own they are quite good. I don't 
blame Atari for producing a better pro- 
gram for their machine than for the op- 
position, it would be bad business 
sense otherwise. 




68 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



PROGRAM GUIDE 



l¥ Liars o ll Ylhut 





Argus Press 
Software Group 



Recommended viewing Mid-evening 



Early Evening 

6.40 pm Orion Quest 

A full feature adventure starring well 
known nasty aliens the Zarps 
Can you play the hero and stop their 
plans to blow up the earth. 

Screen play N. White 
Costume Design D. Jordan 
Directed Martin Edwardes 
Produced Argus Press Software 

Available for Spectrum 48K, BBC, 
CBM 64. 



9.00 pm Quest for Eternity 



Starring The Overlords of the Universe 

The candidate (you) have to get to the 
Chamber of Creation. It's a laugh a 
minute, since it's 2000 light years away 
on the most horrible planet in the Uni- 
verse . . . and your starship doesn't 
work either! 
Written by David Cockram 
Directed Martin Edwardes 
Produced Argus Press Software 
Available for Atari, Spectrum 48K, 
CBM 64. 



Midnight Movie 

11.55 pm Star Force Seven 

Starring The Zurgs 

After a desperate space battle only one 
fleet of heroes remain to prevent the 
invasion of earth. The future of human- 
ity lies with you! 
Written by Ian Soutar 
Special Effects Ian Soutar 
Directed Martin Edwardes 
Produced Argus Press Software 

Available for BBC, Spectrum 48K, 
CBM 64. 



For mail order, write with cheque/ P.O. /card No. to: 

Mind Games, Argus Press Software Group, No. 1 Golden Square, London Wl. 



BraMjtoe 



Last month you may have noticed that we started a new regular section called 
'Brainware'. The format is very similar to our existing software review pages but it 
contains only strategy, adventure, and thinking game reviews. 

Strategy and adventure games are playing a bigger and more important role in 
the software industry as more and more people get bored with the unoriginality of 
games that a lot of software houses produce, and the short length of time it takes 
before you get bored stiff playing them. So we decided to have a special section for 
all our readers that like to play strategy, adventure, or any other non-action games. 

Also last month we started the first of a series about programming adventure 
games, it continues this month with more details on this exciting area of software 
development. Who knows? one day one of your programs may be reviewed on 
these pages! 





king's guards kill you for cowardice. 

You can type your commands in us- 
ing full English only one verb can be us- 
ed in each sentence. The game has a 
resonably large vocabulary so finding a 
permitted word is not difficult. Greedy 
dwarf has no graphical locations (at 
least none I found) which is a pity. 

For keen adventurers greedy dwarf 
would probably be the correct medicine 
for boredom. 



TEMPLE 



GREEDY DWARF 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



BBC Model B 

Goldstar 

£9.95 



Not being a very experienced adven- 
turer I started to explore the world of 
the greedy dwarf very warily. This 
game has done nothing but turn me 
even more against adventure games. 
You have the task of recovering three of 
King Ardanga's finest jewels which 
have just been stolen. The setting is a 
reasonable place, but what possesses 
the King to have mazes in his cellar 
beats me. The jewels in question did not 
steal themselves, but a 'greedy dwarf' 
named Arfa did and the King is seeking 
vengeance on this creature. Unable to 
resist the wealth that you will be 
rewarded, you set off after the jewels 
and Arfa's head. If you fail at your task, 
which you will, you must set out again. 
Also if you return back up to daylight 
without having completed the task, the 




TEMPLE OF VRAN 



Runs on: Spectrum 48 K 
Made by: Incentive Software 
Price: £5.50 

Temple of Vran is a follow up in the Ket 
Trilogy. It is a non-graphic adventure. 
After waiting for what seems hours for 1 
it to load I was asked to wait yet again 
then told my scores (luck, stamina and 
prowess) before the game could be 
started. Break could restart the game to 
try and raise the scores. Having typed in 
your command the program takes ages 



to respond, whereupon you are given 
another place description. If an object is 
present it tells you which one, and next 
to it is a U.D.G. picture of this object. 
These objects may be taken or dropped. 
On various occasions animals, warts, or 
monsters may be encountered. When 
these are fought the game goes through 
a fighting routine. I have never been 
defeated, not even hit! 

The game has a special score facility, 
and you can turn the keyboard beep on 
or off. The game may be saved at a cer- 
tain point. A fair adventure but nothing 
more. 

THE ORACLE'S CAVE 

Runs on: 48k Spectrum, C64, 

Oric 
Made by: DOrcas Software 
Price: £7.95 

This is a pseudo real-time D&D game 
where you start off the adventure at the 
'entrance to the Oracle's Cave. There 
are four levels to the cave, and as well 
as a graphic drawing of your current 
position, there is a map of the Cave per- 
imanently on-screen. To succeed in the 
cave you need to carry out a quest, col- 
lect a certain minimum amount of 
treasure, and finally vanquish the 
Oracle before leaving the cave system. 
And you have to achieve all this within a 
particular timescale — five game 
"days". 

The game starts with a standard sort 
of message — "Cave Design in Pro- 
gress" and then displays you, the hero. 
You are asked what you want to do, the 
maximum choices which you have at 
any time are: move, rest, use an article, 
explore, help abandon game. When you 
encounter a monster it is very nicely 
drawn and your options are to fight or 
move. 

A chart shows you how you are do- 
ing — eg what your energy level is, how 
many wounds if any you have sustain- 
ed, what objects you are carrying, et 
cetera. Examples of some of the objects 
which you will find scattered around are 
weaponry, food, magic rings, a cloak 
and of course, treasure. 

The packaging states that the 
average playing time is forty minutes 
with a maximum of one hour both of 
which seem reasonable estimates. Un- 
fortunately they have more to do with 
waiting time than with entertaining ac- 
tion. The graphics are interesting to 
begin with but soon get wearisome as 
you see the same old things re-drawn all 
the time. The program is in BASIC 
which obviously does not help matters, 
and unfortunately there are one or two 
bugs still present in the program, such 
as when I wanted to used an article I 
was carrying and the program asked 
'What do you want to use?", . or, '". I 
typed in a comma (no, I was not actual- 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 







ly carrying one) and the program happily 
carried on 

Having made those criticisms of the 
game, I still think it will very much ap- 
peal to younger players both of the 
shortness of playing time, its simplicity 
of use, and the fact that it should be 
quite easily modified. 

THE CITY OF 
EHDOLLAH 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



Spectrum 48 K 

Goldstar 

£9.95 



You have been brought to the ruined ci- 
ty of EHDOLLAH by a lust for treasure, 
but unfortunately this greed may lead 
not to fame and fortune but serve only 
to bring about your downfall. Among 
the ruins of this city lie many dreamed 
about treasures to recover, but your 
main aim is to find and capture the 
Sacred Ruby, guarded by Meglin the 
wizard. To accomplish this task you 
must kill Meglin. If you succeed you will 
be acclaimed throughout the known 
universe as 'Supreme Galactic Adven- 
turer'. 

Throughout your search you will en- 
counter strange beasts in dark and 
mysterious areas, should you attack? or 
retreat to safety and conserve your 
precious energy? Combat is in real time 
so you must be quick to think over your 
next move, or else your attacker will 
decide for you. If you run out of stamina 
then the gods will claim you and you 
will have failed in your quest. To regain 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



stamina you must eat, but you only 
have six meals with you. 

If you make it alive and recover the 
Sacred Ruby, the hardest part is yet to 
come. Getting in may have proved 
tough but getting out is the hardest part 
of all. 

The City of Ehdollah is an interesting 
new text adventure game which has 
over 1 00 words in its vocabulary. With 
the tape you get a booklet which gives a 
short history of the events surrounding 
the City of Ehdollah and helpful hints for 
novice adventurers. An enjoyable 
game. 



THE FALL OF ROME 



Runs on: 
Made by: 
Price: 



Spectrum 48 K 
ASP Software 
£6.99 



In 'The Fall of Rome' you command the 
resources of the Roman Empire in it's 
fight for survival against the eleven bar- 
barian tribal groups of the north. You 
must also compete with the two em- 
pires of the east as they try to take ad- 
vantage of your troubles. 

The lengthy instructions provided 
can cause some confusion at first but 
commencement of the game shows 
that the method of play is really very 
simple. 

You are shown a map of the area 
within the Roman Empire, and each pro- 



vince has a Roman name and it's own 
income, the amount of which varies 
from province to province. This income 
can be used to purchase and maintain 
friendly legions, auxiliaries and cavalry. 

The game is divided into 1 2 turns, 
each turn covering a five year period 
from 395 A.D. Working through each 
province in turn you must distribute 
your forces carefully in order to recover 
as many provinces as possible and 
resurrect the Roman Empire. At the end 
of each turn you will be informed how 
many provinces are recovered and how 
many are still under attack. At the end 
of twelve turns, the computer will 
calculate the value of all the provinces 
in which you have forces. The total 
value calculated is your score. The 
scores range from under 1 00 (total 
failure to over 160 (victory). 

The fall of Rome is a time consuming 
strategic game which is a lot of fun, 
especially if you succeed. It is advisable 
however to write down the current 
position of each province as you go 
along, in order to calculate where your 
main forces should be situated and 
which areas are most at risk. An ex- 
citing challenge. 





AT LAST 1 TAPE 2 MACHINES 

COMMODORE 64 VIC 20 




MINIPEDES 

It is the height of summer and the 
garden is buzzing with bees and 
bugs. Minipede, a mutant 
mushroom monster advances 
relentlessly towards you, 
devouring everything in its path. 15 
screens of fast and furious action 
make Minipedes a real challenge to 
the arcade enthusiasts. 
Commodore 64 - VIC 20 1 6K 

J.S. or K.B. £5.95 



Experience the thrills of the gambling csejre of the 
world from the comfort of your own armchair. Both 
versions include features such as spinning reels, hold, 
number-feature nudges, gamble/collect, spin score and 
hi-score. The Commodore 64 version has additional 
features, nudge, reward lucky 3, step-a-win and hi- 
score tables. 

As with any arcade machine the odds are stacked 
against youl 
Commodore 64 - VIC 20 1 6K K.B. £5.95 



TOM THUMB 

Tom is trapped in a scrolling maze 
populated by loathsome creatures, 
guardians of the lost treasures of 
the Magezam. Six separate 
screens, five levels of difficulty and 
four player option provide an 
exciting challenge for the whole 
family. Another stunner from the 
author of BONGO! 
(1 to 4 players) 
Commodore 64 - VIC 20 16K 

J.S. £5.95 





mmm 



mimn 



BONGO 



1! 




V J 




B 




r$gmmm\ 






J.S. AND KEYBOARD 
£7.95 



J.S. 



J.S. 



£7.95 



AND KEYBOARD 
£5.95 



J.S. 



or KEYBOARD 
£7.95 



J.S. 



£7.95 



COMMODORE 64 



VIC 20 



TRADE ENQUIRIES. ANIROG SOFTWARE LTD. 29 WEST HILL DARTFORD KENT (0322)92513/8 

MAIL ORDER: 8 HIGH STREET HORLEY SURREY 24 HOUR CREDIT CARD SALES HORLEY (02934) 6083 
PAYMENT BY CHEQUE P.O. ACCESS/VISA 50p POSTAGE & PACKAGING 



iPMrizfeMEls 



3. ABC 

Here's a very simple crossword. There 
are 26 white squares, and 26 letters in 
the alphabet. Can you use each letter 
just once, and end up with seven words 
that are English and make some sense? 




5. SIMPLE ADDITION 

Substitute tetters for the numbers and 
you should be able to get from your 
favourite person to a feature of Roman 
rchitecture with each word making 
sense 




8 . TERM TIME 

Can you get from RISE to FALL in four 
steps, changing one letter at a time, 
keeping it clean and English 
throughtout? How about BOOT to 
LACE in five steps? SLOW to FAST in 
six steps? 




4. ONE HUNDRED LINES 

Somewhere in LNER country there is a 
single track railway which causes all 
sorts of problems. Here for instance the 



express wants to overtake the goods 
train. The siding there can- take three 
wagons only. Is there a way for the ex- 
press to get past? 



GOODS TRAIN 



E 



1 





EXPRESS 




7 . FULL MARKS 

In this version of noughts and crosses 
you play yourself. All you do is put five 
crosses and three noughts into the grid 
so that no cross is in direct line with any 
nought — down, across or diagonally. 



6 . HISTORY LESSON 

Two people once stood on a front page 
of a newspaper dated November 1 1 th, 
1918, facing each other, in broad 
daylight, yet they were unable to see 
each other. They had perfect eyesight 
— what went wrong? 





9 . PHYSICAL TRAINING 

Imagine you are driving the interstellar 
space train from Zeldoth to Dartus. The 
train leaves Zeldoth at 18.30 (Earth 
Standardised Time). 3 minutes later it 
warps into sector Five and takes on 
teleported passengers at Orius, Nebolus 
and Kor. By 18.40 (EST) the space 



loco is docking alongside Ellacotus 
where transhipment of cargo 
necessitates a delay of 4 minutes. 

Thanks to new developments in the 
Geldon overdrive however, the train ar- 
rives at Dartus only one minute late — 
at 18.59. Can you tell us the name of 
the train driver though? 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



73 



All was peaceful in Tin Town, the silver ^ 
moon shone a blue light into the metal 
works. But wait!! — horror of horrors, 
lurking in the shadows of the metal 
works is none other than Tin Town's 
most wanted criminal, Rusty Bolt the 
mutant builder (so called because of the 
horrific injuries he received from a wet 
tin opener). 

The mutant builder has kidnapped 
three creepy-crawlies and is keeping 
them captive in a large jam jar. Creepy- 
crawlies are protected by Tin Town 
law. The alarm is raised and mild man- 
nered steel worker Nick. L Alloy once 
again must become METAL MAN! 



RUNdown 



Lines 

40-120 

130-273 

275-375 



576-630 

635-695 
695-750 

775-820 
845-880 



885-940 
945-1000 



1001-1090 

1 135-1204 
1205-1270 
1280 



Action 

Redefine characters. 
Set up screen display. 
Main loop. 

Falling routine, makes 
M.M. fall until he 
reaches the bottom of 
the screen, a piece of 
metal, a toadstool, 
an egg, or a spike. 
Make screen flash and 
music play if an egg is 
collected. 

Death routine, redefines 
M.M. and plays music. 
Prints score and number 
of creepy-crawlies 
freed, starts or finishes 
the game. 

Makes sure that MM 
doesn't go off the edge 
of the screen. 
Check to see if an egg 
is in front, or behind, of 
MM. 
Title. 

Moves the bug and 
Mutant builder. Plots 
colour, eggs and 
toadstools. 
Check to see if the 
builder has killed you. 
Creepy crawly type 1 . 
Creepy crawly type 2. 
Check if all the creepy- 
crawlies have been 
freed. 

Add to score and 
number of freed creepy- 
crawlies. 

End of game when all 
creepy-crawlies are 
free. Play tune and start 
or finish program. 





GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 





'5'S^fi 



as 



e 



f vn c\ f n 



a 



%,V 



% 



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17 


REM 


IB 


REM 


19 


REM 


20 


REM 


21 


REM 


22 


REM 


23 


REM 



BY B.D. MORRIS MAY 1984 



1 BRAB 

5 REM **#********#*****##*#* 

10 REM FOR THE ORIC/ATMOS 4BK 

15 REM **#**##*#***#****#*### 

16 REM 

################### 
# MECCANO - MAN # 
################### 

24 REM 

25 SC=0:J=0: QB=0 :CLS: RESTORE 

30 L1=3:M2=27:L2=7:M1=11 : PRINTCHR* (20) 

31 REM 

35 REM/\/\/\ DEFININS SRAPHICS/\/\/\ 

36 REM 

40 A 1=4661 5: A2=46623: A3=46839: A4=46599: A5=46607: A6=464 
47 

50 FORT=0TO7 

60 A 1 =A 1 + 1 : A2=A2+ 1 : A3=A3+ 1 : A4=A4+ 1 : A5=A5+ 1 : A6=A6+ 1 

70 RE AD A : POKEA 1 , A : RE ADB : POKE A2 , B : READC : POKEA3 , C : RE ADD : 
P0KEA4,D:READE:P0KEA5,E 

B0 READF:P0KEA6,F 

90 NEXT 

100 DATA 42,0,63,1 ,32,30,63,63,33,3,48,45,42,0, IB, 21 ,4 
2,51 ,42,0, 12,63,63,45 

110 DATA 42,0,18,19,50,45,21,21,33,2,16,51,42,42,63,2, 
16,45,21,21,0,6,24,30 

111 B 1 =467 1 1 : B2=46367 : B3=464 1 5 : B4=4659 1 : B5=463B3 

1 1 2 FORT=0TO7 : B 1 =B 1 + 1 : B2=B2+ 1 : B3=B3+ 1 : B4=B4+ 1 : B5=B5+ 1 

113 READM,N,0,P,Q!P0KEB1,M:P0KEB2,N:P0KEB3,0:P0KEB4,P: 
P0KEB5,Q 

114 NEXTT 

115 DATA30, 33, 18,0,0,63, IB , 12, 0, 12 , 45,30, 30 , 12, 30 , 63, 6 
3 , 45 , 30 , 30 , 63 , 45 , 43 , 30 , 63 

1 20 DATA63 , 63 , 30 , 1 2 , 12 , 63 , 1 8 , 1 8 , , 1 2 , 30 , 45 , , , 63 

1 30 GOSUBB90 : BOSUB 1 670 : BOSUB 1 370 

200 CLS 

205 REM /\/\/\ SET-UP SCREEN/\/\/\ 

210 X=2:Y=13 

220 PLOT1 , 1 , " " 

230 F0RA=1T026:PL0T1 ,A, ". " : NEXTA: F0RB=1T036: PLOTB , 26, " 
. ":NEXTB 
240 F0RA=2T026lPL0T37,A, ". " : NEXTAi F0RW=1T01 10 
250 E-INT (RND < 1 ) #24) +2: F-INT (RND < 1 ) *32) +2 
260 PL0T2,14," ": PL0T37,24, " O " 

270 PLOTF , E , " " : NEXTW: PL0T2 , 25 , "CDDCDDCDDCDDCDDCDDCD 

DCDDCDDCDDCDDDD " 

271 REM 

273 PLOT0,25,1 

275 REM/\/\/\ MAIN - LOOP/\/\/\ 

278 REM 

2B0 A*=KEY*: IFJ>5ANDX«35ANDY=24THEN GOSUB1140 
290 IFY=24THEN300 

295 I FSCRN ( X , Y+ 1 )< >95ANDSCRN < X+ 1 , Y+ 1 )< >95THENGOSUB430 
300 IFA*= 
310 IFA*- 
320 IFA*= 
0,2,1000 
330 IFA*= 
340 IFA*= 
350 G0SUB845 
360 PLOTX,Y,"AB" 
370 GOTO2B0 
375 REM 

425 REM /\/\/\ FALLINB ROUTINE /\/\/\ 

426 REM 
430 IFY=24THENRETURN ELSE REPEAT: PLOTX , Y, ' 

1,"AB" 

434 Y=Y+1 

435 TT=SCRN(X+1 ,Y+1) : BB=SCRN (X , Y+l ) : SS=SCRN (X , Y-2) : NN= 



"THENPLOTX.Y," 
"THENPLOTX.Y," 
"THENPLOTX.Y," 

"THENPLOTX.Y," 



1 "THENGOSUB950ELSESOSUB780 



: SOSUB950 



:X=X-1 
:X=X+1 
: Y=Y-3: SOUND 1 , Y*Y , 0: PLAY 1 , 

:Y=Y+1:PLAY1,1,1,600 



": PLOTX, Y+ 



:PLOTX-l, 



SCRN(X+l,Y-2> 

440 IFNN=64ORSS=64THENBOSUB570:PLOTX,Y-2, " 
Y-2, 4 

450 IFTT=67THENZAP:BOTO640 

460 IF6B=67THENZAP:GOTO640 

470 IFTT«64THENGOSUB570:PLOTX+l,Y+2," " : PLOTX , Y+2,4 

475 IFGB=64THENBOSUB570:PLOTX,Y+2," ": PLOTX-1 , Y+2,4 

4B0 IFSS-95THENPL0TX , Y-l , "_" : SC=SC+5 

490 IFBB-36THENBOTO640 

495 IFTT-36THENGOTO640 

510 SOUND 1, Y* Y,0: PLAY 1,0, 1,1 000 :SOSUB950 

330 I FTT-3BTHENEXPL0DE : WA I T90 : P I NB s BOTO640 

535 IFGG-3BTHENEXPL0DE: WAIT90I PINB: BOTO640 

560 UNT I LSCRN ( X , Y+ 1 ) -950RSCRN ( X+ 1 , Y+ 1 ) =950RY=24 

565 RETURN 

570 REPEAT 

574 REM 

575 REM /\/\/\ BET AN EBB /\/\/\ 

576 REM 

590 PAPER7 ::WAIT1 : PAPER1 : U=U+1 : MUSIC1 , 3, U,0: PLAY1 , 0, 
1,800 
600 UNTILU=6 

610 U=0: INK4:PAPER0:SC=SC+100: J=J + 1 
620 IFJ>5 THENZAP:WAIT3:PINB 
625 PLOT0,25,1 
630 RETURN 

634 REM 

635 REM/\/\/\ DEATH ROUTINE /\/\/\ 
637 REM 

640 F0RQ=8T01STEP-1:MUSIC1 , 1 ,Q,0:PLAY1 ,0,1 ,2000: WAIT20 
:NEXTQ 

650 MUSIC1 ,0,4, 15: W=46599:XX=46607 

655 FORT=0TO7 

660 W=W+1:XX=XX+1 

670 POKEW,0:POKEXX,0:WAIT5 

6B0 NEXTT 

690 MUSIC1, 1,1,0:PLAY3, 7,1, 3000: WAITB0! CLS: PRINT: PRINT 
:PRINT:PRINT:PRINT 

694 REM 

695 REM /\/\/\ SCORE + NEW GAME ?/\/\/\ 

696 REM 

697 INK08PAPER1 

700 PRINT" you scored ";SC+QB;" points" 
705 INK7:PAPER0 

710 PRINT" and -freed " ; QB/ 10; "creepy crawly 's" 
720 PRINT: PRINT" another game <y/n>?" 

730 A*=KEY*: IFA*="y"THENPRINTCHR*<17) ;CHR*<6> : PRINTC 
HR*(20) :SOTO10 
740 IFA*="n"THENCLS:PRINTCHR*(17) ;CHR*(6) :GOTO1660 
750 BOTO730 
771 REM 

775 REM /\/\/\ STAY ON SCREEN /\/\/\ 

776 REM 

7B0 IFY>24THENY=24 

790 IFY<2THENY=2 

B00 IFX>35THENX=35 

810 IFX<2THENX=2 

820 RETURN 

825 REM 

B4S REM /N/\/\ EGG CHECK /\/\/\ 

B46 REM 

B50 IFSCRN<X-1,Y)=64THENPL0TX-1,Y,' 
B570 

B60 I FSCRN ( X+2 , Y) -64THENPL0TX+2 , Y , ■ 
B570 

B70 I FSCRN ( X+2 , Y+ 1 ) -64THENPL0TX+2 , Y+ 1 , ■ 
4:GOSUBS70 

875 IFSCRN(X,Y+l)=64THENPL0TX,Y+2," ": PLOTX-1 , Y+2,4: GO 
SUB370 

8B0 RETURN 

BB1 REM 

BB5 REM /\/\/\ TITLE /\/\/\ 

8B6 REM 

890 CLS: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRINT: PRIN 
T : PR I NT : I NK7 1 PAPER0 

900 PRINTCHR»(4) ;CHR*(27) ; "J meccano - man 



:PL0TX-2,Y,4:G0SU 
:PL0TX+1,Y,4:G0SU 
:PL0TX+1,Y+1, 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



75 



vira 




by B,Morris">PRlNTs 



910 PRINTCHR*<4)sCHR*<6>!CHR*a7) 

920 PRINTS PRINTsPRINT" 
PRINTS PRINT1PRINT1PRINT1P 

RINT" For Game* computing" 

921 PL0T1B,15,"AB" 
94B RETURN 

941 REM 

945 REM /\/\/\ MOVE BUG + BUXLOER/\/-Vr\ 

946 REM 

9SB E«INT<RNDCl>«B)5Wl-INT(RND<l)#30>sPLOTL2,Ll,"«*' 

953 PL0TL2+1 ,L1 ,4sPLOTL2-l ,1-1-1 ,4sPL0TL2-l ,L1 ,6 

960 PLQTL2,Li-i," " 

97B IFE-2THENPLQTL2,Ll-l,"a"aPLQTL2-l,Ll-l,7sPL0TL2-i-l, 

Ll-1,4 

975 IFE»10RE«80RE«4THENPL0TL2,L1-1," " 

98B IFWl-2THENPL0TL2,H-l,"8e"iPL0TL2-l,Ll-l,2sPL0TL2+l 
, Ll-1,4 

99B IFL1-20THENPLOTL2.L1," "!Ll«3sL2»INT<RND(l>*32)+3 

100(2 PL0TM2,Ml,"*"iPL0TM2+l,Ml,4:PL0TM2-l,Ml-l,4!PL0TM 
2-l,Ml+l ,4!PLDTM2-1,M1,5 

1B01 E£=SCRN<M2,M1-1>:FF-SCRN(M2-2,M1> sRR«SCRN<M2+2,Ml 
) 

1BB2 PL0TM2,M1+1,"_" 

1BB4 IFE£=65THENPLDTX,Y, »AB"sBQTO640 

1 005 I FFF-65THENPL0TX , Y , " AB " : GOTO640 

10B6 IFRR=65THENPLOTX,Y,"AB"sGOTO640 

1B07 I FFF-66THENPLDTX , Y , " AB " s B0TD64B 

1 008 IFRR-66THENPL0TX , Y , "AB" s SDTO640 

1015 IFEE-66THENS0T064B 

1040 IFMK4THENPL0TM2.M1," "sMl«20sM2«INT(RND<l>»32>+3 

1050 Ll-Ll+1 

1B60 Ml-Ml-1 

1090 RETURN 

1134 REM 

1135 REM/\/\/\ CREEPY~CRAWLY/\/\/\ 

1136 REM 

1137 REM/\/\/\ TYPE 1/N/S/N 
113B REM 

1140 V«INT(RND(1>»2)+1 
1145 IFV-2THEN1210 
1150 FORS-34T038TEP-1 

1155 IFG<19THENPLOTG+3,23,4 

1156 PUOTS-1,23,1 

1160 PL0TB,23,"/0\"iWAlT2 

117B PLOTB,23,"-0-":WAIT2 

1180 PLOTS, 23, "\0/"sWAIT2 

1190 PL0TB.23," "sSOUNDl,8*G,0sPLAYl,0,4,70 

1200 NEXTB 

1204 GQTO1280 

1205 REM 

1206 REM/\/\/\ TYPE 2 /\/\/\ 

1207 REM 

1210 F0RL=23T03 STEP-1 

1220 SOUND3,L*L,0sPLAY7, 0,1, 9000 

1225 PLOT 33,L+l,4tPL0T 36,L,4iPL0T32,L,3 

1230 PL0T33,L,"/0S"sWAIT2 

1240 PLOT33,L,"-0-"sWAIT2 

1250 PLOT33,L,"\0/"sWAIT2 

1260 PL0T33,L, " " 

1270 NEXTL 

1280 IFQB»20 THENG0T01297 

1290 SC-SC+50S QB=QB+10l J«0l PINGs RETURN 

1291 REM /\/\/\ WIN GAME /\f\/\ 
1295 REM 

1297 CLSs PRINTsPRINTsPRlNTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINT 

1298 PAPER 1 

1300 PRINTCHR*(4)iCHR*<27>5"N congratulation* 

1305 PRINTCHR*<4)sF0RY»BT01STEP-l 

1306 FORC-100TO1STEP-15! V-INT (RND ( 1 ) *7) +1 

1307 SOUNDl,C+Y#30,0:SOUNDl,C+Y#5,0sSOUNDl,C#Y,0sPLAYl 
,0,1, 10009 INKV 

130B NEXTC 

1309 NEXTYsCLSiPRINTsPRINTsPRlNTsPRINTsPRINT 

1310 PRINTsPRINTiPRINTsPRINT" you have freed all":PR 



INT 

1313 PRINT" of the creepy crawl y's' 

1315 INK7tPAPER0 

1320 PRINTiPRINT" with a score of ";SC+QB 

1330 PRINTsPRINT" press 'z - to play or 'r' to end" 

1340 A*-KEY#s IFA*»"z "THENPRINTCHR* (2B> ; CHR* ( 17) s CHR* (6 
) I B0T0 10 

1350 IFA*»"r"THENPRINTCHR*{6) 8CHR*U7> :SOTO1660 

1360 GOTO 1340 

1364 REM 

1365 REM /\/\/\ INSTRUCT IONS/V/W 

1366 REM 

1370 PRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINT" in this game you 
meccano-man ' " 

1375 PAPER6 

13B0 PRINTsPRINT" must free the creepy crawly 's," 

1390 PRINTsPRINT"frpm the Jar down in the bottom corne 
r" 

1400 PRINTsPRINT" you can only free them one at a time 

1410 PRINTsPRINT" (and only when you have eaten 6 bug 
eggs) " 

1420 PRINT" You score points by eating eggs and by fr 
eeing the creepy crawly ■*■ 

1430 PRINT" by jumping up and touching the mecca 
no you can pull it down" 

1440 PRINT" and score more point's" 

1450 PRINTsPRINT" but beware! t you are not alone on th 
e building site" 

1460 PRINTsPRINTsPRINT" push any key" 

1470 IFKEY*=""THEN1470 ELSESHOOT: PAPER2 

14S0 CLSs PRINTS PRINTs PRINT" a mutant builder is cons 
tantly laying mecca 
no" 

1490 PRINTsPRINT" you can stand on the meccano he lay 
s" 

1500 PRINTsPRINT" but bump into him ahd you've had i 
t" 

1510 PRINTsPRINT" a helpful bug goes round laying 
eggs and the odd " 

1515 PRINT" piece of meccano now and then , 
but watch out" 

1520 PRINTsPRINT" that you dont jump on any poisionou 
s toadstools that he drop 




walking into them is quite harmle 
falling from great hi Bants 



thou 
is 



1530 PRINT" 
gh" 

1540 PRINT" 
painless " 

1550 PRINTsPRINT" so is falling onto the fence, if you 

dont hit the spikes!" 

1560 PRINTsPRINT" press any key's for controls" 

1370 IFKEY*«=""THEN 1 570ELSEP I NGs PAPERS 

15B0 CLSsPRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINT" the controls 
are as follows" 

1590 PRINTsPRINT" a» Jump" 

1600 PRINTsPRINT" z» dig" 

1610 PRINTsPRINT" <= left" 

1620 PRINTsPRINT" >* right" 

1630 PRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINTsPRINT" good luc 
k ! ! ) " 

1640 PRINTsPRINT" press any key" 

1650 IFKEY*»""THEN1650 ELSEINK4sPAPER0: RETURN 

1660 PRINTCHR*(20)sPINGsEND 

1664 REM 

1665 REM/\/\/\ TITLE MUSIC/\/\/\ 

1666 REM 

1670 FORG=100TOlSTEP-5 

1684 PLOT3,9,INT(RND(l)*6)+lsPLOT3,10,INT(RND(l)*6)+l 
16B5 SOUNDl,B,BsPLAYl,0,l,1000sSaUNDl,G+20,0sSOUNDl,B+ 
50,0 
1690 NEXT 

1694 IFN-lTHENEXPLODEsCLSs INK0sRETURN 

1695 N»lsFORG-lTO100STEP5sGOTO16B5 
1700 END 




GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



New from CDS, your chance to experience the 
challenge, thrill and excitment of .... 




BIRDIE BARRAGE 

Available for the BBC and Electron £7.95 



SPANISH IS FUN 

Available for the Spectrum 48K, MSX 
and soon for the Amstrand f 7.95 

INCLUDING AUDIO 



ITALIAN IS FUN 

Available for the Spectrum 48K, MSX 
and soon for the Amstrand f 7.95 

INCLUDING AUDIO 




CASTLE BLACKSTAR 

Imagine. . . As you awaken from a sleep troubled by 
strange dreams and visions you find yourself in a lux- 
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high and arched with a huge relief map of the moon 
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The most striking feature of the room is the woman 
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spun silver. She carries easily an air of authority and 
wisdom. 

She speaks again, ", . . finally when you locate the orb 
you must return it to me. You may keep any mortal 
treasures you find after I have cleansed them of evil." 
She pauses then, " Go forth and do my bidding." 
You bend and bow saying, "My Lady Artemis. . ." 
Darkness enfolds you, until suddenly you find your- 
self awake in the sunlight of the vale of Castle Black- 
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Avaiable for the Spectrum 48K 
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soon for the Amstrad and BBC £6.95 



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Telephone: (0423) 504526. 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



79 









,,: ... 




ANSWERS 



1. THAT'LL TEACH YOU 

There is of course a logical solution. 
Since 1 247 = 178x7+1 and if you 
imagine the doors in sets of 7 — first 
A-G then H-B, then 1 78 sets will finish 
at B. One more takes you to A. I'd bet- 
ter check that. 1 ,2,3,4,5.... 



ABC 



2 . GUEST SPOT 

The ladder does tend to rise with the 
ship — so 2 rungs only. 

He cannot reach the button for the 
1 4th floor — he is a midget working at 
the local circus. He can just reach the 7 . 

1 .5 and 0.5 





4. 100 LINES 

The poor old goods train driver backs in- 
to the siding and unhooks 3 wagons, 
then moves some way down the line. 
The express comes along, passes the 
siding, backs up and picks up the 3 
wagons, moves them out and backs 
down the line. The goods train nips into 
the siding. The express, now hopelessly 
late, unhitches the wagons and moves 
off. The goods train eventually emerges 
and goes back in search of three spare 
wagons back up the line somewhere. 
Things improved after nationalistion. 



6 . HISTORY LESSON 

The newspaper was under a door with 
one stood each side of it. "The things 
we do for Lou and Les" said one. And 
the other agreed. 



7 . FULL MARKS 



5 . SIMPLE ADDITION 


l\ 

I s\ 
S I p\ 

L I P S\ 
PILE S\ 
P L I E R S\ 
R E P L I E S\ 
REPTILE S\ 
PER I STYLEX 





X X 

X 
X X 

~o~~o 



8. 


TERM TIME 


RISE 


BOOT 


SLOW 


RILE 


LOOT 


SLOT 


FILE 


LOOK 


SOOT 


FILL 


LOCK 


LOOT 


FALL 


LACK 


LOST 




LACE 


LAST 
FAST 



9 . PHYSICAL TRAINING 

For those of you asleep at the back; try 
the first line again. If still in doubt, 
check the name tag sewn onto your 
school blazer. 



ADVENTURE info oon( 



ri\Ui 



Here is the long awaited second part of our series on writing adventures. 
This month the subject is setting up the scenario. 



oKnl it in ib 



Now that you have created the map 
for your game, you must decide what 
objects you want to find in the different 
locations and any responses such as 
'O.K.' or 'I can't go in that direction' 
which might be given more than once. 
These will then need to be placed into 
DATA statements and I would recom- 
mend locating the data at the very end 
of the program so that it is easy to see 
where any mistakes occur. Listing 1 
should give you the idea. 

One difficulty you might find is that 
your descriptions may be too long to fit 
into DATA statements. Owners of 
VICs, and C64s in particular should try 
to keep the length of their descriptions 
short so that they will fit into the DATA 
lines. Spectrum, and BBC owners are 
more fortunate, although very long 
descriptions will eat up memory space 
in BBCs and VICs (unless you have 
managed to use a data compression 
technique). 

Our next task is to DIMension the ar- 
rays and READ the DATA into them. 
Supposing the game has 30 locations, 
24 objects and 40 common phrases, 
then listing 2 shows one method of 
reading this data. You will notice that I 
have used single letter variable names. 
It is possible to use meaningful names 
on machines like the Electron, but 
generally in an adventure game you are 
trying to fit a large volume of text into 
the computer and you will need to save 
every byte of memory. I have used in- 
teger arrays (A% rather than A) 
because in most machines they use 
much less memory and often run faster 
as well, if you use a machine which 
does not support these, just leave the 
% sign off. 

Variables Used 

A$(X) holds the description of 

locations 
A%(X,Y) holds the map (as 

explained last month) 
B$(X) holds the description of 

objects 
B(X) holds the pointer to the 

location found 
C$(X) holds the word recognised 

D$(X) holds the phrases. 

Thus going North from location 1 will 
take you to location 2, South to 
location 3, East to location 5 etc. 

Listings 1 and 2 will work for the 
majority of computers, but Spectrum 
owners will need to make the following 
changes: 

a. String variables in DATA 
statements MUST be included in 
inverted commas. Thus line 1 001 will 
be: 



10010 DATA 
yard", 2, 3,5, 7 



grave- 



indicate the maximum number of letters 
it can hold. Thus line 20 could be 
changed to: 

20 DIM a$(30,100): DIM a(30,4): DIM 
b$(24,100): DIM 

This means that each location's 
description can hold a maximum of 1 00 
letters. 

c. Change all capital letters from 
variable names into small letters. 



Listing 1 



10000 REM * * locations followed 
by map * * 

10010 DATA in a graveyard, 2, 3, 5, 7 
20000 REM * * objects found 
-X- -X- 

20010 DATA a crucifix, 4, CRUCIFIX 
30000 REM * * * common 
phrases 
30010 DATA not likely, O.K., 



Listing 2 



b. When DIMensioning the arrays, 
you will need to separate the arrays 
with colons and in addition, string 
arrays will need a second number to 



10 REM * READ the DATA into ar- 
rays ■* * 

20 DIM A$(30),A%(30,4),B$(24), 
B%(24),C$(24),D$(40) 

30 FOR X=1 TO 30 

40 READ AS(X) 

50 FOR Y=1 TO 4 

60 READ A%(X,Y) 

70 NEXT Y,X 

80 FOR X=1 TO 24 

90 READ B$(X),B%(X),C$(X) 

100 NEXTX 

110 FOR X=1 TO 40 

120 READ D$(X) 

130 NEXTX 

A major problem you are likely to en- 
counter when you first attempt to write 
an adventure game is that of jumping 
out of loops. Having been brought up 
with MICROSOFT basic, I found it dif- 
ficult at first to convert to BBC BASIC, 
where only 10 nested FOR NEXT loops 
are permitted and I rapidly ran into pro- 
blems of TOO MANY FOR'S IN LINE 
1000 errors. 

I would strongly advise you to plan 
your program structure very carefully 
so that if you do jump out of a loop, you 
jump back into it at the same point and 
that your subroutine does not in itself 
include more than 1 jump. 

Oric owners have a statement 
available which can get them out of this 
difficulty. POP will remove the last 
pointer from the stack. It is much bet- 
ter, however, to write a program which 
is well structured as it makes debugging 
far easier. 

Listing 3 shows one method of 
writing the main control loop. I have 
chosen to use the variable P% as a 
pointer to the current location, so that 
the program starts in location 1 , 
although there is no reason why you 
can't start at any other location. 

This listing shows the basic idea, but 
will need to be adapted for other 



machines. You will notice that the 
routine REPEATS the loop until the 
score is 100 percent: 

repeat 

clear the screen 

print description of location 

print directions you can go in 

print description of objects 

input your action 

call procedure to split input sentence up 

into two words 

call procedure dependent upon your 

first word 

until score = 100% 

Machines which don't support the 
REPEAT UNTIL loop should delete line 
1 60 and replace line 1 000 with: 

IF SCORE < 1 00 THEN GOTO 1 70 

You could also introduce colour into 
the display using for example: 

180 PRINT CHR$(1 29) "I can go" will 
produce red text on BBC and ORIC, 
other machines should use INK, 
BRIGHT etc as appropriate. 

Line 320 calls PROCobjects which I 
will deal with next month in detail. Most 
machines do not have procedures and 
therefore you should replace this line 
with GOSUB line number. In a similar 
way, PROCword is called from the main 
loop, where it splits your input into two 
words. 

If, for example, you INPUT the 
response EAT FOOD when prompted 
'What shall I do?', the program will send 
the input string F$ to the procedure (or 
subroutine) which will split it into two 
words and return the program to the 
following line (360). Thus the variable 
G$ will hold the word 'EAT' and H$ 
'FOOD'. 

Listing 3 

140 REM #■ * Main control loop. 

BBC/ELECTRON version * * 

1 50 LET P% = 1 

160 REPEAT 

170 CLS: REM Commodore users 

change this line 

180 PRINT " I am ";A$(D 

190 PRINT " I can go " 

200 LET E$ = "" 

210 IF A%(P,1)>0 THEN LET 

E$ = "North" 

220 IF A%(P,2)>0 THEN LET 

E$ = E$ + "South" 

230 IF A%(P,3)>0 THEN LET 

E$ = E$ + "East" 

300 PRINT E$ :REM print directions 

310 PRINT "I can see: " 

320 PROCobjects 

330 PRINT "What shall I do "; 

340 INPUT F$ 

350 PROCword 

360 IF G$="N" THEN PROC north 

370 IF G$ = "EAT" THEN PROCeat 

1000 UNTIL SCORE =100 

1010 PROCwin 

Next Month 

Next month, I shall look at these pro- 
cedures in more detail and explain how 
to move around the different locations. 




"Sub-Hunt" is an arcade type game 
that will Run on the 1 6 K ZX Spectrum. 
It has full arcade features including high 
score table and extended play. 

The idea of the game is to destroy 
the submarines by lining up the greater- 
than sign at the side of the screen with 
the submarine and then dropping your 
depth charge. The depth charge will ex- 
plode at the height set by the greater- 
than sign. Use keys 'Q' and 'Z' to move 
the greater-than sign up and down the 
side of the screen respectively. Key 'I' 
will drop a depth charge. 

At the top of the screen is PRINTed 
two scores. Your score and the high 
score. If your score is greater than the 
high score, your score will go white. 
When you hit a submarine you will be 
given points; the deeper the submarine 
is the more points you will get. You will 
get double points if you hit the sub- 
marine in the centre. 

At the side of the screen is a fuel 
scale that will gradually go down. When 



the fuel runs out the game will end, 
unless you have achieved extended 
play. Extended play is awarded at 5000 
points. When your score reaches 5000 
"extended play" will be PRINTed on the 
screen momentarily, and when your 
fuel runs out "extended play" will again 
be PRINTed and you will be given twice 
as much fuel as you had when you 
reached 5000 points; once into an ex- 
tended play your fuel will be PRINTed in 
red. 

Occasionally a white submarine will 
appear at the bottom of the screen. This 
is a bonus 'Ghost Sub' and it is worth 
1000 points or even 2000 if you can 
hit it in the centre. If you press key 'M' 
your ship will thrust but you will use up 
a lot more fuel. 

When the game starts, a tune will be 
played. A different tune will be played 
at the end of the game. 

When the game has finished, pro- 
viding your score is greater than and 
you are in the top ten scores, you will be 



asked to enter your initials. The letters 
will rotate in alphabetical order, for- 
wards or backwards, when you press 
keys ' Q' or ' I' . When the correct letter is 
selected, press key 'M' and go on to the 
next letter. When you have entered all 
three initials, the high score table will be 
displayed. The initials that you have just 
entered will appear on the table in 
white. 

Another game will start after 1 
seconds or when any key is pressed. 



82 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 




Lines 



Pre^game routine 



130-150 



Main 

190 



200 



210 
220 



230 



240 
250 

260 



265 



Clear the screen and ft 
it with cyan (5) water 
and the blue (1 } fuel 
scale. 

Initialize all variables 
that require re-setting 
before each game. 
Other variables are set 
during the initialisation 
routine (line 1000 
onwards). 



game loop 

PRINT cursor (» at 

correct position and 
:■■ PRINT spaces above 

and below it to erase its 

last image. 

Allow cursor's position 

to be altered by keys 

'Q' and 'Z'. Note that 

whenever necessary, IN 

has been used instead 

of INKEY$ (see chapter 

23 of manual) so that 

one or more keys can 

be read simultaneously. 

PRINT boat followed by 

2 spaces to erase its 270 

last image. 

PRINT submarine 

followed by a space to 

erase its last image, if 

submarine is at 

maximum depth (20) 

then PRINT it in white 
, (7). . 

If a depth charge is in 275 

the water then GOTO 

the relevant sub-routine 

(336-380, see next 280 

section). Note that this 

routine returns to line 

250, thus not allowing 290 

two depth charges in 

the water at the same 

time 

Allow a new depth 

charge to be dropped 300 

. (key 'I'). 

Increment variables 'tf' 

and if player wishes to 

abort game then GOTO 

390, the after game 

routine. 310 

If 'tf is now greater 

than or equal to 3 then 

reset it to 0, erase the 

top part of the fuel 
■: scale and decrement the 320 

variable 't' (fuel 

remaining.) 

If extended play has 
; just been achieved then 325 

cali routine at line 720 



to indicate this to the 
player and LET the 
variable 'Z' equal the 
amount of fuel you have 
remaining (t). 
If fuel has run out, 
extended play has not 
yet been used, and 
score is over or equal to 
5000 points then call 
the routine to line 720 
again and GOTO 680, 
which gives extended 
play. 

If fuel has run out then 
GOTO 390, the after 
game routine. 
Move submarine and 
boat and check if hold 
(key 'H'! is pressed. 
If thrust (key 'M'i is 
pressed then move boat 
another step and 
decrease fuel by 
another 2 steps. 
If the submarine has 
reached the far right of 
the screen, then erase 
it, reset it to the start of 
its path arid give it a 
new, random height. 
If the ship has reached 
the far left of the 
screen, then erase it, 
and reset it to the start 
of its path. 
PRINT score and high 
score. If score is greater 
than high score, then 
PRINT it in white (7). 
If this is the first time 
around the loop, then 




327 



play introductory tune 
(line 560 ) before con- 
tinuing. 

Return to the start of 
the loop (line 190). 



Depth charge routine 

330 Set all variables used by 

this section. 

340 Increment the variable 

that controls the depth 
of the missile. PRINT 
relevant character (first 
character of a$) below 
a space to erase its last 
image. 

350 Re-shuffle the 

characters of a$ to 
bring the next character 
needed to the front of 
the string. 

360 !f a depth charge has 

reached the bottom of 
the screen or the height 
of the cursor then erase 
it. .-' ' ' 

370 Check for hits, award 

scores. BEEP, erase any 
sunken submarines, 
reset them to the far 
left of the screen and 
give them a new - 
random height. 

380 Return from routine (tine 

250). 

After game routines 

390-400 Call depressing tune 

(line 570) and compare 
last score with the 10 




84 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



held in the table in turn. 
If the score does not 
rank then GOTO 530. 

410 Clear the screen. 

420-422 PRINT instructions in 

teletype style. Note that 
in all such routines a 
key press will terminate 
the effect and simply 
PRINT (though without 
colour) the remaining 
text. 

425-490 Form the arcade style 

entering of the initials. 
Line 430 PRINTs the 
letters, lines 440-460 
alter them according to 
key presses, line 470 is 
a simple delay loop, line 
480 fixes an initial, 
moving to the next, and 
line 490 returns to line 
430 completing the 
*"""* k -v. cycle. 




510-520 
530 

540 



Shift all the scores in 

the table below the 

latest one down 1 

position in the table, : 

discarding the lowest 

score. 

Place latest score and 

initials in the table at. 

the correct point. 

Tow on words 'todays 

greatest' behind the 

ship, which then chugs 

off. 

PRINT scores 



550 



Game tunes 

560 



570 



Instructions 

580-590 



620-660 



670-675 



(preceeded by 0's if 
necessary) and initials 
of top 1 players. 
PRINT latest score 
initials in white. 
PAUSE (10 seconds), 
clear the screen and 
start a new game. 



Play before game 
'cheery' tune. 
Play after game 
'depressing' tune. 



Tow on words 'sub 
hunt' behind the 
submarine (line 580) 
which then chugs off 
(line 590). 

PRINT the first sheet of 
instructions in teletype 
style. 

Wait for a key press 
then PRINT the second 
sheet of instructions in 
teletype style. Wait for 
a key press then clear 
the screen and RETURN 
line 1 170). 




1050-1110 
1130-1160 

1165 



that my method of 
creating graphics is 
shorter than the usual 
ones used. 
Data for U.D.G's. 
Initialise strings 
containing instructions. 
Initialise graphic strings 
and the arrays which 
hold the high scores and 
initials. If instructions 
are required then GOTO 
the subroutine at line 



\ 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 




Extended play routine 

580-710 Decrease extremely 

large figure (z 
Increase extremely 
small figure (z" 
Redraw fuel scale to 
the required height. 
Reset variables. 
GOTO 280. 



690-700 
710 



PRINT 

720 

730-780 



EXTENDED PLAY' routine 

Set PAPER colour to 

cyan (5 

PRINT and erase the 

words 'EXTENDED 

PLAY' five times. 

Set PAPER colour back 

to green (4 

RETURN. 



Initialise 

1010 
1020-1040 



Set screen colours 

Create graphics. Note 




1 165 



1 space and Graphics 

D,E,F 

Graphics A,B,C and 1 

space, 

Graphics B,C and 1 

space, 

Graphic C and one 

space, 

1 space 

1 space and Graphics 

D,E,F, 

1 space and Graphics 

D,E, 

1 space and Graphic D, 

1 space 

Graphics A,B,C,G and 8 

spaces 

1 2 spaces and Graphics 

G,D,E,F. 



Variables Used 



a 
a$ 



dc 



d(x) 



d$ (x,y) 



ef 



e$ 
f 



Used for defining graphics 

String containing the four 

stages of the rotating 

bomb 

Three element array 

containing the character 

codes of the three letters 

being entered as initials 

minus 65 

'x' co-ordinate of depth 

charge. 

'y' co-ordinate of depth 

charge. 

Eleven element array 

containing the 1 1 highest 

scores. 

Eleven by 3 element array 

containing the initials of 

the 1 1 high scorers. 

Flag to show if extended 

play has been awarded 

(1 =yes) 

High score table title 

Flag to show if depth 

charge has been dropped. 

Control variable of delay 

loop (independent of its 

other use). 



f$ 

g$ 

he 
hs 
h$ 
i$ 

i$ 

k$ 
i$ 

m$ 
n 



Pb 
Pf 



Instructions title. 

First set of instructions. 

Height of cursor. ps 

Height of submarine. 

Second set of instructions. s 

Terminator of first screen sf 

of instructions. 

Second screen of 

instructions. t 

Terminator of instructions. 

High score instructions 

title. 

High score instructions. 

General purpose control tf 

variable. 

Position of latest score in 

table. 

'x' co-ordinate of boat. z 

Flag to show if 



'EXTENDED PLAY' 
message has been shown, 
'x' co-ordinate of 
submarine. 

Score of current player 
Flag to show if this is the 
first revolution of the main 
loop. 

Fuel remaining: Also 
corresponds to the 'y' co- 
ordinate of the next points 
of the fuel scale to be 
erased. 

Counter of number of 
times the main loop has 
been executed: used in 
decreasing the players fuel. 
Value of 't' when extended 
play achieved. 



0>REM * IfcB BILLUPS 1983 * 

120 NEW 

130 CLS : FOR n=21 TD 4 STEP -1 

140 PRINT INK 5; AT - , ■ • t, lMIMnm f mr imaBI *' 1SrS * ia!r * a-^-^^-^-^^*"-,-'^ -"■■>■»-■■ "; INK !:"»" 

150 NEXT n 

170 LET p-f=0: LET sf=0: LET e-f=0: LET t*=0: LET t=144: LET s=0: LET hc=10: LET 
ps=li LET pb=27: LET *=0: LET a*="!\6/' 1 

1B0 LET hs=INT <RND*15)+6 

190 PRINT AT hc,0;" ";AT hc-1,0;" " ; AT hc+1,0;" " 

200 LET hc=hc+<IN 65278=253 AND hC<20)-UN 64510=254 AND hc>4) 

210 PRINT AT 3,pb;"ABC " 

220 PRINT INK (hs=20>*7; PAPER 5;AT hs.ps;" DEF" 

230 IF f=l THEN GO TO 340 

240 IF IN 57342=251 THEN GO TO 330 

250 LET t + =t-f + l: IF INKEY*="a" THEN GO TO 390 

260 IF tf>=3 THEN LET tf=0: INK 1+ef: LET t=t-l: PLOT OVER l;248,t: DRAW OVE 
R 1; 7,0: INK 

265 IF s>=5000 AND pf=0 THEN LET pf=J: GO SUB 720: LET z=t 

270 IF t=0 AND ef=0 AND S>=SOGfJ THEN GO SUB 720: GO TO 6S0 

275 IF t=0 THEN GO TO 390 

280 LET ps=ps+l: LET pb=pb-l: IF INKEY*="h" THEN PAUSE 10: PAUSE 

290 IF IN 32766=251 THEN LET pb=pb-l: LET tf=t-f+2 

300 IF ps=27 THEN PRINT PAPER 5;AT hs,ps:" "j LET ps=l: LET hs=INT (RND*15) 
+6 



THEN LET s=s + UO*hs 
l,hs: PRINT PAPER 5; 



": LET pb=27 
*7; AT 0,1; "SCORE " 



310 IF pb<=0 THEN PRINT AT 3,pb; 

320 PRINT INK (s>d<l) AND d ( 1 > >0 

INK O; "HIGH ":d ( 1 ) 

325 IF 5-f=0 THEN GO SUB 560: LET sf = l 

327 GO TO 190 

330 LET -f = l: LET d=4: LET dc=pb+l: 

340 LET d=d+l: PRINT PAPER 5;AT d ,dc ; a$ C 1 ) ; AT d-l,dc;" 

350 LET a$=a*(2 TO >+a*(l) 



25-LEN (STRi d(l) 



360 IF d=hc OR d=21 THEN LET -f=0: PRINT PAPER 5;AT d,d 

370 IF hc=hs AND ha=d AND <dc=ps+l OR dc=ps+2 OR dc=ps+3 
t I+<dc=ps+2> ) )+(h==20)#800+(hs=20 AND dc=ps+2) *800: BEEP 
T hs,ps;" ": LET ps=li LET hs=INT <RND*15>+6 

3B0 GO TO 250 

390 GO SUB 570: FOR p=I TO 10: IF s.-d(p) THEN GO TO 410 

400 NEXT p: GO TO 530 

410 CLS 

420 FOR n=l TO 21: PRINT l*(n>;: BEEP . 005, 30- 1 1 * Cn) =" ")*30: NEXT n: PRINT ''* 
': BEEP .05,20: PLOT 78,167: DRAW 8B,0: FOR n=l TO 216: PRINT m$(n);: BEEP .005, 
30-(m*(n)=" ")*30: IF INKEY*<>"" THEN PRINT m*tn+l TO »: GO TO 425 

422 NEXT n 

425 BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,8: DIM c(3): FOR n=l TO 3 

430 FRINT AT 28,14;CHR* (c { 1 ) +65) ; CHRS (c (2) +65) ; CHRf <c£3)+65> 

440 IF ctn)=0 AND INKEV*e"q" THEN LET c(n)=26 

450 IF ctn)=25 AND INKEY*="i" THEN LET c(n)=-l 

460 LET c (n)=c(n)+(INKEY*= M i " AND c (n)<25) - v INKEY*="q" AND c(n)>0> 

470 FOR -f = l TO 10: NEXT -f 

480 IF INKEY*^'!^ 1 THEN BEEP .01,20: NEXT n: GO TO 500 

490 GO TO 430 

500 FOR n=ll TO p+1 STEP -1: LET d(n)=d(n-l): LET d* (n) =d* tn-1 ) : NEXT n 

510 LET df(p)=CHRS (c ( 1 ) +65) +CHR* (c (2) +65) +CHR* (c(3)+65) 

520 LET d(p)=s 

530 PAUSE 25: PAUSE 25: CLS : FOR n=l TO 25: PRINT AT 3,30-njeft TO n): BEEP .0 
1,0: BEEF .01,1: NEXT n: FOR n=5 TO STEP -Is PRINT AT 3,n;"ABC "; BEEP .01,0i 
BEEP .01,1: NEXT n: PRINT AT 3,0:"BC " : BEEP .01,0: BEEP .01,1: PRINT AT 3,0;"C 
": BEEP .01,0s BEEP .01,1: PRINT AT 3,0;" " 

540 PRINT ■"": FOR n=I TO 10: BEEP ,01, n: PRINT TAB 11;: FOR m=l TD 5-LEN (STRi 

d(n)): PRINT ;"0";: NEXT m: PRINT ;d(n);" "; INK (p=n) *7: d* (n ) : NEXT n 

550 PAUSE 500: CLS : GO TO 130 

560 BEEP .3,7: EEP .1,9: BEEP .1,11: BEEP .1,12: BEEP .4,14: PAUSE 5: BEEP .3,1 
6: BEEP .3,18: BEEP .4,19: RETURN 



86 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



BEEP .3,0: BEEP 



3: BEEP 1. 



570 BEEP .9,4: BEEP .9,0: BEEP 1,-3: BEEP . 
3,-7: RETURN 

580 CLS : FOR n=24 TO 1 STEP -1: PRINT AT 2,0;-fSCn TO >: BEEP .01,10: BEEP .01, 
11: NEXT n 

590 FOR n=20 TO 28: PRINT AT 2,n;" DEF": BEEP .01,10: BEEP .01,11: NEXT n: PRIN 
T AT 2,29;" DE": BEEP .01,10: BEEP .01,11: PRINT AT 2,30;" D": BEEP .01,10: BEEP 

.01,11: PRINT AT 2,31;" " 

620 PLDT 96,151: DRAW 64,0: BEEP .05,20: PRINT '': FOR n=l TO 315: PRINT INK f 
n>293 AND n<303) *7% g* <n> ; : BEEP . 005,30- tg* Cn> =" ")*30: IF INKEY*<>"" THEN PRIN 
T ;g*(n+l TO ): GO TO 630 

625 NEXT n 

630 BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,B 

640 PRINT ■': FOR n=l TO 64: PRINT INK <n>51 AND n<56) *2; h* (n > ; : BEEP .005,30- 
<h*(nl=" ">*30: IF INKEYSO"" THEN FRINT ;h*<n+l TO ): BO TO 650 

645 NEXT n 

650 BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,8 

660 PRINT '';" ";: FOR n=l TO 24: PRINT i$<n);: BEEP . 005, 30- <i* (n ) =" " ) 

*30J NEXT n 

670 BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,8: PAUSE 10: PAUSE 0: PAUSE 10: CLS : PRINT : FOR 

n=l TO 218: PRINT jt(n);: BEEP . 005 ,30- ( j* (n ) =" ">*30: IF INKEY*<>"" THEN PRINT 

;j*(n+l TO ): GO TO 675 

672 NEXT n 

675 BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,8: PRINT AT 21,10;: FOR n=l TO 20: PRINT k*(n);: BEEP . 
005,30-(k*<n>=" ">*30: NEXT n: PAUSE O: BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,8: CLS : RETURN 

680 IF z>70 THEN LET z=70 

681 IF z<30 THEN LET 2=30 

685 INK 2: FOR n=0 TO 2*z: PLDT 248, n: DRAW 7,0: BEEP -01,n/3: NEXT n: INK 

690 LET e-f = l 

700 LET t=2*z+l 

710 GO TO 280 

720 PAPER 5 

730 FOR n=i TO 5 

740 PRINT AT 21 ,9; "EXTENDED PLAY" 

750 BEEP . 1 ,20 

760 PRINT AT 21,9; " 

770 BEEP .1,10 

780 NEXT n 

790 PAPER 4 






w 



e 



8Pap 



BOO RETURN 
1000 REM #** INITIALISE *** 
1010 BORDER 4: PAPER 4: CLS 
1020 FOR n=0 TO 55 
1030 READ a: POKE USR "a"+n,a 
1040 NEXT n 

1050 DATA 0,3,3,255,127,63,31,15 
1060 DATA 24,255,255,255,255,255,255,255 
1070 DATA 0,192,254,254,252,252,248,240 
1080 DATA 0,0,63,127,255,127,63,31 
1090 DATA 24,24,255,255,255,255,255,255 
1100 DATA 0,0,252,254,255,254,252,248 
1110 DATA 0,0,0,0,126,0,0,0 

1130 LET g*=" HIT AS MANY SUBS AS POSSIBLE BEFORE YOUR FUEL RUNS OUT. 
E THRUST FOR EXTRA SPEED BUT ITS COSTLY ON FUEL. JUST LINE UP YOUR 

■>■ WITH THE SUBS AND BOMBS AWAY 1 DOUBLE POINTS ARE AWARDED FOR 

ACCURATE SHOOTING. WATCH OUT FOR THE lOOO POINT BHOST SUB'. GO 

OD LUCK ! " 
1140 LET h*=" DEEPER SUBS SCORE MORE POINTS. EXTENDED PLAY FOR '5000' POINTS.": 

LET i*="HIT ANY KEY TO CONTINUE.": LET k*="HIT ANY KEY TO START" 
1150 LET j*="USE- 'O' TO RAISE CURSOR 

'Z' TO LOWES CURSOR 'I' TO RELEASE BOMBS 'M' TO THRUST 

'H' TO HOLD 'A' TO ABORT MISSION" 

1160 LET 1*=" HIGH SCORE.": LET mS=" CONGRATULATIONS YDU HAVE SCORED O 

NE OF TODAYS HIGHEST SCORES 1 PLEASE ENTER YOUR INITIALS FROM LEFT TO RIGHT US 
ING St I. WHEN YOU HAVE FOUND THE LETTER YDU WISH PRESS M AND GO ONTO 

THE NEXT ONE" 
1165 LET e*="ABCGTODAYS GREATEST " : LET f*=" SUB HUNTGDEF": DI 

M d(H): DIM d*(Il,3>: FOR n=l TO 11: LET d*(n) = "...": NEXT n: FOR n=20 TO 30: B 
EEP .01,n: NEXT n: PRINT AT 9,3; "Do You Want Instructions ?";AT 12, 12; " < Y> es" ; AT 

14, 12; " <N>o": PAUSE 0: IF INKEY*="y" THEN BEEP .3,15: BEEP .3,8: GO SUB 580 







BOCKMAN 

FILES 



This month Simon Rockman the hair brained hacker is at it again with the 
QL and a new film from Virgin featuring a 12 foot high Pac-Man! 



This "Rockman Files" is being written 
on a Sinclair QL using the "Quill" word 
processor, partly to prove to myself 
that it works and partly to test the 
TYEPRO RS232 to Centronics inter- 
face. 

Quill has developed a poor reputa- 
tion, it isn't as bad as a lot of people 
have been saying. It is however very 
slpw, so perhaps my expectations are 
loWer than other peoples. 

I have just received the first issue of 
QLUB news. This is the newsletter of 
the official QL user group. Run for 
Sinclair by Psion, it provides support for 
the bundled packages and is supposed 
to be an information exchange. Issue 1 
is pathetic, three sheets of unfilled waf- 
fle. The big news item is that 65% of 
QL owners have joined QLUB. I reached 
for my calculator. Sinclair claim to have 
sold 15,000 QL's. 65% of 15,000 is 
9750. Each of these members paid 
£35 so QLUB's income has been 
£341,250. The result is very disap- 
pointing and can't have taken much 
more than a day to prepare, let alone 
the six months or so since the computer 
was launched. 

"K-OS" at Sinclair 

The newsletter is divided into many 
paragraph long sections. One explains 
that some QLs were shipped with ROM 
cartridges and that these would be 
replaced by the end of August. This is 
not really news, I got my ROM refit 
voucher the week before the newsletter 
arrived. There is a bit of general hype 
about the Psion packages and some 
hints on filling in the complaint form to 
Psion. The next page is full of hype for 
Sinclair and an appeal for material to fill 
the newsletter — they need it! There is 
a promise that QLUB members will hear 
about the new developments in ad- 
vance of the public. However there is 
no mention of hard disks, SuperBASIC 
toolkits, expansion boxes, RAM packs 
or even add-on microdrives all of which 
are due to be launched. The list of third 
party languages does not include GST's 
68K-0S. The "technical section" is not 
really technical at all, in the main it is a 
statement of the obvious. 

The comment that files to a printer 
should be opened with "serlc" if your 
printer uses CHR$(13) for end of line 




implies that some printers are non- 
standard when it is really the QL at 
fault. There is a section with some er- 
rata for the Archive manual. I realise 
that it is difficult to print a first issue of 
anything but with the close contact that 
QLUB has with Sinclair I would have at 
least hoped for an interview with a 
member of the QL development team. 
The Independent QL user group has 
produced six newsletters, with some 
quite useful info, the print quality is not 
a patch on the official version but they 
are free to "Sinclair-bash" and don't 
have to pretend that bugs are either 
unimportant, features, or don't exist. 
This means that they can suggest ways 
around the bugs. 

Odd gossip that I have heard about 
the QL shows how much it was chang- 
ed during the machine's development. 
It is common knowledge that the QL 
was supposed to have a battery backed 
up clock and that this was removed at 
the last minute. It was taken out so late 
that Sinclair had already bought all the 
batteries! Maybe they can sell them to 
ICL for the QL derived One-Per-Desk 
(OPD) computer-cum telephone. 

There are very few monitors which 



can cope with the full size screen on the 
QL. This is because the QL was original- 
ly supposed to be sold with a monitor so 
the non-standard screen size did not 
matter. Judging from the number of 
people I have heard complaining about 
having to buy a monitor with an 
Amstrad I reckon that Sinclair was right 
to sell the QL on its own. 

There will be a Sinclair badged 
monitor in the "near" future and an 
eight colour dot-matrix printer. There 
will also be a full set of accounting pro- 
grams from Sinclair but they may be 
pipped to the post by a firm called 
Quest who are selling CP/M 68K with 
proper disk drives for the QL. This will 
open up the range of software for the 
QL tremendously. 

There is a fair bit of CP/M 68K soft- 
ware around, not as much as for the 
other CP/M systems and it's pricey but 
that's better than nothing. 

Virgin's Electric Dreams 

It is unusual for Games Computing to 
get invitations to anything other than 
computer and games launches so when 
a spare ticket for the new Virgin film 
"Electric Dreams" was offered to me I 
jumped at the chance. If you get an- 
noyed at people pretending that com- 
puters are magic then this is not a film 
for you. The abilities of the computer in 
the film are pure fantasy, so far beyond 
fifth generation they would make the 
Japanese wince. Suspend reality and 
accept what is presented as you would 
in a Herbie film and it is great fun. Com- 
puter graphics fans will enjoy the 
scenes of the hero getting chased by a 
twelve foot high Pac-man. 

The hardened critics at the preview 
thought it was slushy. I enjoyed it and 
will go again when it is released. The 
music by Culture Club sounded very 
unlike their previous stuff and will no 
doubt be played to death on the radio. 
Being a Virgin film the computer shop 
where the hero buys his toy is stocked 
to the gills with Virgin software. 

The film is set in California so I 
wonder how the 'Owzat' cricket game 
does down there! One mistake I noticed 
was a UK spec BBC for sale, so that 
scene was not shot on location. Virgin 
films have certainly got off to a good 
start. 



88 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



GAMES COMPUTING 



Lineage: 40p per word. C3 mmm 

Semi display: £9.00 per single column centimetre 
Ring for information on series bookings/discounts. 

All advertisements in this section must be prepaid 
Advertisements are accepted subject to the terms and conditions 
printed on the advertisement rate card (available on request) 




01 - 437 0699 

Send your requirements to: Jane 
Edmunds, ASP Ltd., 1 Golden 
Square, London W1. 



SOFTWARE GAMES 



STAINLESS SOFTWARE 
for the TI99/4A only 

The longest established supplier of 

third party cassette software. 

Over 1 00 programs, games & 

utilities, including 16 with 5 Star 

Reviews. Disk Programs include 40 

column display. 

(MAIL ORDER ONLY) 

For large catalogue, please send a 

large S.A.E. to: Stainless Software, 

10 Alstone Road, Stockport, 

Cheshire SK4 5AH. 



DISCOUNT MAIL ORDER SOFTWARE 

Zaxon E4.95 Manic Miner E5.35 

Trashman £5.35 The Boss £8.05 

Jet Set Willy £5.35 Cos. Crusr £4.95 

Football Mgr £6.25 Snooker £8 05 

& more. State title & machine. SAE for 
lists. cheque/PO to 

Dept (G.C.) Universal Publishing, 
65 Thurlow Park Rd., London SE21 8JP 



COMPUTER SOFTWARE AND 
ACCESSORIES, send 2 x 16p 
stamps for free lists stating which 
computer to: Electronic Facilities 
3 High Street, Sandy Beds. SG19 
1AG. 



20% OFF SOFTWARE (RRP) 

Games, Utilities educ, adv., for Spectrum, ZX81 , BBC, Comm- 64, Vic 20, 
Oric & Dragon. State computer. Send SAE for lists. 



SPECTRUM 

Attic Attack (Ult) £4.40 

3D Ant Attack (Q/S) £5.56 

Lords of Midnight £7.95 

Scuba Dive (Durrell) £4.40 

Hunchback (Ocean) £5.56 

Lunar Jetman (Ult) £4.40 

Alchemist (Imag) £4.40 

Hobbit (Mel. Hse) £11.56 

Super Spy (Shepherd) £5.20 

Pyramid (Fant.) £4.40 

Fall of Rome £5.56 

Fighter Pilot (Dig) £6.36 

Tasword Two (Tasman) £11.80 

Sabre Wulf (Ult) £7.95 



COMM. 64 

Manic Miner (S/W Proj) £6.36 

Boogaboo 64 (Q/S) £6.36 

Chinese Juggler (Ocean) £5.52 

Mr Wimpy (Ocean) £5.52 

Hobbit (Mel. Hse) £11.56 

Hungry Horace (Mel. Hse) £4.76 

Hover Bovver (Llamasoft) £6.00 

Hunchback (Ocean) £5.52 

Bumping Buggies (Bubble 

Bus) £5.59 

Flight Path 737 (Anirog) £6.36 

Space Pilot (Anirog) £6.36 

Solo Flight (M. Prose) £11.95 



JOYSTICKS 

Crackshot £8.95 • Quickshot II £9.95 

JAYCEE SOFTWARE (GC), Freepost (EN84), Forres, IV36 0BR 



SOFTWARE FROM 
£1.99 

Post Free. For the VIC 20, 
Commodore 64. and Spectrum. 

S.A.E. for details from: 

Dukeries Software, 

39 High Street, Warsop, 

Nr Mansfield, Notts. 



CYGNUS TWO 

COMPUTER 

GAMES 

Spectrum. BBC. Electron, 
Commodore and VIC 20. 
Write or phone for our super 
brochure packed full of reviews 
and special offers. Please state 
your machine. 
62 Woodland Road, Chingford, 
London E4 7EU 
Tel: 01 - 529 1891 



WHY PAY TOP PRICES FOR 

COMPUTER/VIDEO GAMES 

SOFTWARE? 

We can supply software for BBC 

Micro B, Vectrex, Atari 
400/800/2600, One, Intellivision, 
Texas TI99/4A, Commodore Vic 

20/64, Dragon 32, ZX 

Speclrum/81 , Colcovision. Philips 

Videopack. Send SAE for 

catalogue and prices list. 

Computer video games hardware 

also available. Please state 

system required. 

A+VP (PCT) 

406 Lymington Road, 

Highcliffe, Dorset BH73 5HE 



BOOKS 



POPPING, Break Dancing. Teach 
yourself. SAE for details. Dance 
Publications, 136 Monkhill Lane, 
Pontefract WF8 1 RT. 



LIBRARIES 



LIBRARIES 



LOOK! Any program for any micro 
at 20% discount. Also the only tape 
exchange club specialising in 
today's TOP 20. (Spectrum, Com- 
modore). Membership free. Write, 
stating micro, to Ham Software 
Library, Ham Lane, Elstead, Surrey 
GU8 6HQ. We've got the lot. 



CARTRIDGE CITY 

For Atari 400/600/800 and 
Commodore 64 cart, rentals. 
Yearly membership £5. 
Rates from 20p per day (equiv) 
Large SAE appreciated. 

Cartridge City, Dept GC, 25 Gaitside 

Drive, Aberdeen AB1 7BH. Tel: (0224) 

37348. Please state machine. 



AUCTIONS 



MICRO COMPUTER 
AUCTIONS 

Regular monthly auctions for all micro 
hard & software. 

Send for entry form or next catalogue 

to: 

MICRO COMPUTER AUCTIONS (GC), 

59 Grays Inn Road, London WC1X 8TL 

Tel: 01-242 0012 (24 hours) 



ATARI 
SOFTWARE 



SPECIAL OFFER 

for Atari 400/600/800 owners 

Hire your first 2 games free from our 

extensive range of software Up lo 

the minute releases available. Apply 

now 1 Send S A.E quoting relcrence 

G.C. to 

CHARNWOOD GAMES 

27 Warwick Avenue, Quorn, 

Leics. 

Tel: 0509 412604 



ATARI 800-XL 
Disc Collector 

A complete disc cateloguing system 
also run-ioad files. 13 functions £18.95 
incl. P&P. Send cheque/P.O. to: 

Zoom Soft 

46, Huntsworth Mews, 

London, NW1 

01-723-0562 



ATARI GAMES 



ATARI 400/800 

FAST LOADER 

Reduce tape loading time of almost all 
of your single or multistage tapes by up 
to 50%. Uses standard 410 or 1010 re- 
corder, £10 

600XL MEMORY UPGRADE 

Upgrade your 16K to64K. Complete kit 
with full instructions £75 

Listing and prom blowing also avail- 
able. Send large S.A.E. for further 
details on the above and other pro- 
ducts. All prices incl. of P&P. 

S. Terrell, 17 Cock Close Road, 

Yaxley, Peterborough, 

Cambs PE7 3HJ 



ATARI 400/ 

600/800/XL 

OWNERS 



COPYSCAN — Duplicate discs, map 
disc, bad sectors (810), format, disc, 
digital readout £19.95 

COPYSCAN 1 — Provides the true bad 
sector generator, you will never have to 
fool with ridiculous speed adjustments 
again. Simple installation 15-20 mins 
required. Dupes, discs, map disc 
etc. £34.95 

PROJECT — The Project will allow you 
to write to both sides of the olsc without 
cutting notches. Write project without 
labels. Just plugs in £13.95 

ARCHIVER EDITOR — Back up any 

disc with this software/hardware 
application, includes custom formater. 
The best and most advanced dupli- 
cator in the world. Copies all kinds of 
format 

£97.95 

MASTER MENU — transfer to all your 
discs. LOADSTRUNS basic/binary 
files. Automatically lists a directory to 
your screen, will either load/run or just 
load a file at 1 key press £11.25 

For further details phone 01-723 0562. 
Prices incl P&P. Send cheques PO to: 

U SOFT, 

46 Huntsworth Mews, 

London NW1 6DB 



SERVICES 



Specially Designed 

Cassette Inserts for 
Computer Games and 
^ Programmes 

™ For more information 

Phone:061-336 4161 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



89 



TI99/4A SOFTWARE 



SOFTWARE 



FOR SALE 



SOLWAY SOFTWARE 

FOR THE TEXAS TI99/4A 

SYSTEM TRADER The interplanetary trading game. 

CRUISER Will you survive your canal holiday? 

GET THE GEESE OFF! 6 screens of increasing difficulty as you try to 
chase unwanted geese from your fields? 

SPRING-HEELED JACK More birds! This time they're trying to wreck the 
bridge you must cross! 

CHARLIE AND THE GHOSTIES Not for the faint hearted! Collect rubies 
under the constant threat of joining your opponents in the hereafter! 

TUMBLEDOWN TOWER A real-time adventure game in an ancient 
tower with a personality complex! 

ALL CASSETTES AT £5.55 INC P&P 
PLEASE SEND SAE FOR FULL LIST 

SOLWAY SOFTWARE 

6 Curzon Street, Maryport, Cumbria CA15 6LL 
TEL: (0900) 812579 



CbtfcP INJ TMfc. Hfa^rtT Of 



->-W(i C-AMt HIS ^iLND'&lD ," 
At-JAttfc T\AAT HG. lo rtS h Hi, Tn- 1 -/ 




OI-«f-57- 0626 



COMPUTER SOFTWARE 
BUSINESS AND GAMES 
FOR MOST COMPUTERS 

Commodore 64, VIC 20, BBC, 
Atari, Dragon, Spectrum MZ700, 
ZX81. 

New releases for CBM 64, 
Spectrum, BBC, Atari, Dragon, 
Spectrum, MZ700, ZX81. 
New releases for CBM 64, 
Spectrum, BBC. Every 2 weeks — 
just send SAE and we send you a 
new list every 2 weeks. 
Altai C10 data cassettes 40p 
each. 5 C15 data cassettes 
£2.40 5'/ 4 " floppy discs D/sided 
— DL density 
£2.30 each or 5 for £10. 

Send to: M. J. Seaward, 

St. Olaf's Road, Stratton, 

Nr. Bude, Cornwall EX23 9AF 

Tel: (0288) 4179 



TO FILL THIS 

SPACE PHONE 

01 - 437 0699 



SOFTWARE 
APPLICATIONS 



SOLVE ANY ANAGRAM 

Crack Codes. Win big prizes. 
Treasure Hunt Tool kit 

HCW 4 star rating • • • * 
£4.95 16k or 48k Spectrum. 

State which. 
G. W. Components, 50 Oak 
Tree Lane, Mansfield, Notts. 



Replica Blank Firing 
Colt 45 Automatic 

As used by U.S. army, ideal stage 
prop with ammo. £5.25. 
Carriage 50p 



Replica 44 auto 

Magnum 

The gangsters favourite, 

with ammo. £4.35, carriage 

50p 







Colt Python 357 

As used by Police and 

screen heavies. £4.45, 

carriage 50p. 

Ideal for video film making. Mail order only 

Send POs or cheques to: 

RAZZAMATTAZZ, 80 Selhurst New Rd.. 

London SE25 



JOKES 




FREE 

Britain's No. 1 Joke 
Catalogue, packed 
with over 500 practical jokes from 5p 

Stink bombs. Whoopee cushion, wobbly lager 
glass, laxative tea bags, smoke bombs, wiihe 
sugar, cigarette bange's, joke blood, sick, turds. 
soap sweets, wet jokes, exploding jokes, magic 
tricks, party fun kits, masks, make-up. sea mon- 
keys, girl strip pens, adult party packs, saucy 
novelties, naughty presents, posters, badges, the 
complete Joke Shop by Post. 
Send V5p stamp with your name and address for 
bumper colour catalogue and Free Gift to: 

MATCHRITE, THE FUNNY BUSINESS 

(DSPT G.C.), 167 WINCHESTER ROAD, 

BRISTOL BS4 3NJ 



ATARI OWNERS 



ATTENTION all Atari owners. 
Atari machine code games 
wanted, good royalties paid: Maxi 
Printer/Plotter Jotter (9 modes) 
£5.50. Fact sheet (programming 
tips) E1. Games exchange 
facilities (sae). Mighty Splash Ltd 
(GC), 123 Islandmagee Road, 
Whitehead, Carrickfergus, Co. 
Antrim B1 38 9NP. 



CLASSIFIED ADVERTISEMENT — ORDER FORM 



Please place my advert in GAMES COMPUTING for 



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4. 


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8. 


9 


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When placing your ad, please state classifi- 
cation required 40p per word. 
Send to: ASP Classified, 1 Golden Square, 
London W.1. Tel: 01 - 437 0699 



Name 
Address 



Tel. No. (Day) 



issues commencing as soon as possible. It 



AD INDEX 



\ 



ABRASCO LTD 21 

ACORNSOFT 32, 33 

ACTIVISION 61 

ALLIGATA 53 

ANIROG 55,72 

APEX SOFTWARE 19, 79 

ARGUS PRESS SOFTWARE 54, 69 

CASCADE 79 

CDS 77 

COMMODORE 30, 31 

CURRASH COMPUTER COMPONENTS IBC 

DOMARK 19,21 



INTRIGUE 79 

LANTERN SOFTWARE 19 

MICRODEAL OBC 

R & R SOFTWARE 3 

SUPERSOFT 44 

TASKSET 37 

THOR COMPUTER SOFTWARE IFC 

WALTERS COMPUTERS 56 



90 



GAMES COMPUTING OCTOBER 1984 



/ T 







] 0j 



Svnth 



SPEECH 64 for the Commodore 64 is ready 
to talk immediately on power-up, has an infinite 
vocabulary and extra BASIC commands. Retailing 
at only £29.95, SPEECH 64s advanced 
features will give you, your family and friends 
lots more fun with your computer! Its sister unit 
/^SPEECH — for the Sinclair Spectrum — is a 
smash hit in the CIK and over 10 other 
countries, and has been awarded the CTA 
'Product of the Year' accolade. 

SPEECH 64 is easy to use! It needs no 
software to be loaded, it does not steal RAM 
from the BASIC operating system, or stop 
arcade style action. 

With extended BASIC commands like SAY and 
its Text to Speech facility SPEECH 64 can 
be programmed in plain English, just like this: 
SAY "to say anything you want" 

You can choose from two different voices, each 
with programmable intonation, and other 
commands control the voicing of keys as they 
are pressed — a useful educational aid for 
young children. 



OXQ to, 



SPEECH 64 comes complete, with full 
documentation and two free full colour posters. 
Watch out for SPEECH 64 as it appears in 
retail outlets nationwide — or use the order 
form below, at no extra cost. 



©y u u& 



nn 
n 



Computor Components Ltd 



To: SPEECH 64 Offer, P.O. Box 1 , Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, NE8 1 AJ 

Please Supply SPEECH 64 unit(s) at £29.95 each incl. VAT & P & P 

pel 






Name (please print) 

Address (please print) 

Postcode .... 

I enclose a cheque/PO payable to 'SPEECH 64 Offer' value £ 
ordebitmyAccess/BarclayCardNo. [~ I 



Signed {credit card orders not accepted unless signed) 

Credit Card Hotline 091 ■ 482 4683 Please allow 28 days For delivery. Offer valid UK only 



Available for 

COMMODORE 64 ATARI 16K 
DRAGON 32 TANDY COLOUR 



\ 





CASSETTE £8 
DISK £9.95 



Danger 
Ranger must 
collect ten keys 
from the Chamber of 
Pasha, whilst warding off 
the Floating Urns, Radio- 
active Bats and Roving 
Eyes. Then he must face 
the Acid Chamber to collect 
all the Treasure Chests, 
avoiding not only the drops 
of acid, but shooting the 
four demons which guard 
the chamber. Five levels of 
Play. Sound Effects. High 
Speed arcade action game. Full 
colour graphics. Machine Language. 



Mail Order Sales from 

Microdeal Mail Order 41 Truro Rd, 

St. Austell Cornwall PL25 5JE 



Credit Card Sales j 
Phone 0726 3456 



^m,imm 



Dealers Contact 
MICRODEAL DISTRIBUTION 
0726-3456 
or WEBSTERS SOFTWARE 



GR6MAL 



0483 62222 



Selected Microdeal Titles available from computer dealers nationwide or from larger branches of